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Re: [medievalsawdust] Hand tools (was: Dovetails)

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  • Hal and Julia
    In one of my books from Taunton press has an example of a roman claw hammer very similar. Hal ... From: Tracie Brown To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Sent:
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 9, 2003
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      In one of my books from Taunton press has an example of a roman claw hammer very similar.
      Hal
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, September 08, 2003 3:35 PM
      Subject: [medievalsawdust] Hand tools (was: Dovetails)

      >http://gallery.euroweb.hu/html/d/durer/2/13/4/index.html

      >Nope, no chest in this engraving.  The chief objects of
      interest here (to
      >us) are the plane, the dividers, an interesting form of the
      square, and a
      >straightedge.

         I've always liked the very modern looking claw hammer in
      the upper left quadrant of the engraving.

      -- Signy


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    • James Winkler
      Mercer s Ancient Carpenter s Tools also shows a couple of Roman hammer heads (p. 265-266) that would have just needed a price tag and a place to hang in your
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 9, 2003
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        Mercer's "Ancient Carpenter's Tools" also shows a couple of Roman hammer heads (p. 265-266) that would have just needed a price tag and a place to hang in your local Ace Hardware to be 'modern'... but one of the coolest Roman things are the Roman Carpenter's plane (p. 115)that Mercer has photos of.  13.5 inchs long high pitch single blade... I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere under the rust would be the words "STANLIUS" somewhere... probably an early relative...
         
        Yers -
        Chas.
      • kjworz@comcast.net
        One flaw with ancient Roman hammer design, the one with the simple head and no side straps, the one whose form was unchanged for ages before Rome s rise and
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 9, 2003
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          One flaw with ancient Roman hammer design, the one with the simple head and no
          side straps, the one whose form was unchanged for ages before Rome's rise and
          ages after its fall, was the tendency for it to "fly off the handle". BONK!
          Ow! There is so little surface area between metal and wood that a wedge was no
          enough to hold it.

          One way to address this flaw used for almost as long as that design is having
          the blacksmith (a man inimately connected to hammer design because he was
          making his own...) include those long straps that go down the handle that can
          them be pinned to the wood.

          Innovation in North America took it another step, by adopting a feature from
          another ancient tool, the adze. Adze head hammers have more surface area and a
          flare hole that gave the wedge more holding power. Americans also designed
          axes with more surface area by making wider 'cheeks' on the axe head compared
          to European models. That and the adze handle shape was also adapted
          (somewhat), with modifications, to the axe handle, so we get a much different
          beast than the straight-poled, narrow-headed axes originally brought over from
          the Old Country.








          > Mercer's "Ancient Carpenter's Tools" also shows a couple of Roman hammer
          heads
          > (p. 265-266) that would have just needed a price tag and a place to hang in
          your
          > local Ace Hardware to be 'modern'... but one of the coolest Roman things are
          the
          > Roman Carpenter's plane (p. 115)that Mercer has photos of. 13.5 inchs long
          high
          > pitch single blade... I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere under the rust
          would
          > be the words "STANLIUS" somewhere... probably an early relative...
          >
          > Yers -
          > Chas.
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