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RE: [MedievalSawdust] thin stock joints

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  • Rebekah d'Avignon
    Finger joints are easy if you are using a table router (almost too easy). They aren t that hard with hand tools - just make the fingers as wide as your chisel.
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 15, 2008
      Finger joints are easy if you are using a table router (almost too easy). They aren't that hard with hand tools - just make the fingers as wide as your chisel.


      C N Schwartz <kjworz@...> wrote:
      Finger joints, pre-industrial?  I'm curious.  I can see the advantage with a powered circular saw, but not with a handsaw.  I've found it harder to simulate finger joints with a handsaw than to just go ahead and make mechanically superior dovetails.  I'd love to see Roman examples!
       
      As for the original question, you can make dovetail joints on stock that small.  How period it is is another argument.
      .




      The dissatisfaction of the populace with any form of government takes one of two forms: First, people register their complaint at the ballot box and through petitions and demonstrations. When that doesn't work, dissatisfaction takes the form of mobs in the street with torches and pitchforks....adjusted for the current technology and availability, of course.


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    • C N Schwartz
      Yes, but if you are going to do that with chisel and handsaw, you might as well make dovetails, is what I m saying. It might be MORE work if you make as many
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 15, 2008
        Yes, but if you are going to do that with chisel and handsaw, you might as well make dovetails, is what I'm saying.  It might be MORE work if you make as many finger joints as are usually made with a machine.   
         
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Rebekah d'Avignon
        Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2008 7:41 AM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] thin stock joints

        Finger joints are easy if you are using a table router (almost too easy). They aren't that hard with hand tools - just make the fingers as wide as your chisel.


        C N Schwartz <kjworz@comcast. net> wrote:
        Finger joints, pre-industrial?  I'm curious.  I can see the advantage with a powered circular saw, but not with a handsaw.  I've found it harder to simulate finger joints with a handsaw than to just go ahead and make mechanically superior dovetails.  I'd love to see Roman examples!
         
        As for the original question, you can make dovetail joints on stock that small.  How period it is is another argument.
        .




        The dissatisfaction of the populace with any form of government takes one of two forms: First, people register their complaint at the ballot box and through petitions and demonstrations. When that doesn't work, dissatisfaction takes the form of mobs in the street with torches and pitchforks.. ..adjusted for the current technology and availability, of course.


        Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

      • Tracy Swanson
        ... From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of C N Schwartz Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2008 5:04 PM To:
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 15, 2008
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
          Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2008 5:04 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] thin stock joints

          Yes, but if you are going to do that with chisel and handsaw, you might as well make dovetails, is what I'm saying.  It might be MORE work if you make as many finger joints as are usually made with a machine.   
           
           
          .

            
          A macaroni tool would make short work of it, simply use the size of the tool to dictate the size of the fingers.
           
          In Magical Service,
          Malaki
        • kirkdrago
          I ve used both box and dovetails on 1/4 stock. If you ve never done dovetails, practice with box joints first. You can use a dado blade on a table saw or a
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 15, 2008
            I've used both box and dovetails on 1/4" stock. If you've never done
            dovetails, practice with box joints first. You can use a dado blade
            on a table saw or a straight router bit and a spacing jig. If you
            really want to do a dovetail, use a router 1/2" dovetail bit and a
            spacing jig till you get the feel of how they work.

            Yours in sawdust,
            Kirk Dragomani


            >
            > At 10:47 AM 14/01/2008, you wrote:
            > >What is the best joint to use in small jewelry boxes with 1/4" thick
            > >walls? Is that too thin for dovetails, or will they still work?
            > >
            > >Lady Stephanie Lilburn
            > >Stephanie Smith, Ph.D
            > >Hunt County, Texas
            > >Owned by a Poodle and an Australian Cattle Dog
            > >K5AMK
            >
          • John LaTorre
            ... You know, there is one place where finger joints are easier to cut than dovetails, even for hand tools. That s where you are stacking a number of boards or
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 16, 2008
              "C N Schwartz" wrote:

              >
              >
              > Yes, but if you are going to do that with chisel and handsaw, you might as
              > well make dovetails, is what I'm saying. It might be MORE work if you make
              > as many finger joints as are usually made with a machine.

              You know, there is one place where finger joints are easier to cut than
              dovetails, even for hand tools. That's where you are stacking a number
              of boards or whatever and, using a miter-box type jig, cutting the
              joints into several boards at a time. That wouldn't be possible for
              dovetails, which are cut at an angle other than perpendicular.

              --Johann von Drachenfels
              West Kingdom
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