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Re: Finish Question

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  • Craig Pierpont
    Hi all, I m tempted to try to give an online tutorial on shellac here but the basic info is available lots of places. A couple of things that might not be
    Message 1 of 35 , Jan 10, 2008
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      Hi all,

      I'm tempted to try to give an online tutorial on shellac here but the basic info is available lots of places.

      A couple of things that might not be clear from the available info though follows:

      1. Freshness: Mix your own. If you really have to buy premixed stuff, check the date. Even then, run a test.
         Mixed shellac deteriorates gradually, reaching worthlessness in about a year. After it has been mixed for so long it simply will not dry. Premix should have a date on the can. Stores often wipe the date off when the stuff goes out of date. Put a drop on a piece of glass. Do not spread it. If you can dent it with moderate pressure of your fingernail in the morning, use it for fire starter.
      2. Mix your own. Lots is made about getting the mix right - 2 lb. cut 3 lb. cut etc. It's not high chemistry. All you are doing is controlling the consistency of the mix as you apply it. Once it dries it will all be the same except that a thicker will tend to lay down a thicker coat.
         An easy approximate 2 lb. mix is to fill a 1 pint wide mouth canning jar to the 8 oz mark with alcohol. (Find the ones with the measurements on the side.) Add shellac flakes to the 10 oz mark. Stir periodically until dissolved. (I hook mine up in a drill press and let it stir.)
      3. Even the flakes themselves deteriorate after time, in which case they won't dissolve no matter how long you wait or how much you stir.

      4. Good fresh shellac will go down and dry quickly. Each coat will dissolve into the previous coat. In the end, though the finish will seem dry in a few hours, it will continue to dry and shrink for quite a while (days for sure, weeks probably). If you are going to rub out the final coat, the longer you can wait, the better it will go.

      bon chance,

      Craig Robert


      Craig R. Pierpont
      Another Era Lutherie
      www.anotherera.com


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    • Kiley Glass
      When you use your smoke alarm as a kitchen timer, it s not really the same as starting a fire, is it now? That s the line I ve taken with the kids and I m
      Message 35 of 35 , Jan 13, 2008
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        When you use your smoke alarm as a kitchen timer, it's not really the same as starting a fire, is it now? That's the line I've taken with the kids and I'm sticking to it. My husband I don't have to worry about. It's highly unlikely that he'd notice, which at times is very convenient. He usually just wants to know if he needs to go pick up take out or not. Gotta love a man like that.
         
        Caileigh

        Liedtke Goetz <goetzliedtke@...> wrote:

        --- Kiley Glass <caileighsoaps@ yahoo.com> wrote:

        > Yes sir. The kids hate it when mommy starts a fire in the kitchen.

        But how can you tell if the roast goose is done without setting off
        the smoke alarm?

        Goetz

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