Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Looking for a book review

Expand Messages
  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    Anyone know anything about this book? Domestic Wooden Artifacts by Caroline Earwood Radiocarbon dating has made possible a chronology for the hundreds of
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007

      Anyone know anything about this book?


      Domestic Wooden Artifacts

      by Caroline Earwood

      Radiocarbon dating has made possible a chronology for the hundreds of previously undated wooden artefacts found during the drainage works and peat diggings in 19th and 20th century Ireland and Scotland. Using these results this book is able to analyse the developments in manufacturing methods of domestic wooden artefacts in Britain and Ireland from the Neolithic to the end of the first millennium AD. The distribution of artefacts - chronologically and geographically - and the organisation of manufacture and the cultural context are analysed and discussed, and comparison with European types made. The relationships between function, style and value of wooden artefacts and those made of metal, pottery and stone are also examined. `One of the most refreshing and stimulating recent books on British archaeology' - Current Archaeolgy. 300p with 136 figs & illus. (Exeter UP 1993)

       



      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      'Dare Something Worthy'



      Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
    • Beth and Bob Matney
      Yes. I have a copy. Buy it. Beth
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007
        Yes. I have a copy. Buy it.

        Beth

        At 07:42 PM 12/5/2007, you wrote:

        >
        >Anyone know anything about this book?
        >
        >
        >
        >Domestic Wooden Artifacts
        >
        >
        >by Caroline Earwood
        >
        >
        >
        >Radiocarbon dating has made possible a chronology for the hundreds
        >of previously undated wooden artefacts found during the drainage
        >works and peat diggings in 19th and 20th century Ireland and
        >Scotland. Using these results this book is able to analyse the
        >developments in manufacturing methods of domestic wooden artefacts
        >in Britain and Ireland from the Neolithic to the end of the first
        >millennium AD. The distribution of artefacts - chronologically and
        >geographically - and the organisation of manufacture and the
        >cultural context are analysed and discussed, and comparison with
        >European types made. The relationships between function, style and
        >value of wooden artefacts and those made of metal, pottery and stone
        >are also examined. `One of the most refreshing and stimulating
        >recent books on British archaeology' - Current Archaeolgy. 300p with
        >136 figs & illus. (Exeter UP 1993)
        >
        >Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
        >
        >Aude Aliquid Dignum
        >'Dare Something Worthy'
      • Tracy Swanson
        Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the annual tree ring
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007
          Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the annual tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of where they grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early Middle Ages.
           
          Just thought this might be of interest...
          In Magical Service,
          Malaki

           

        • Ralph Lindberg
          ... annual ... where they ... Middle Ages. ... Actually yes, and it doesn t work like you describe. It s called Dendrochronology, while it can be accurate, it
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007
            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tracy Swanson"
            <tstar2000@...> wrote:
            >
            > Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual
            > tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the
            annual
            > tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of
            where they
            > grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been
            > traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early
            Middle Ages.
            >
            Actually yes, and it doesn't work like you describe.

            It's called Dendrochronology, while it can be accurate, it requires
            correlation to the growing area and maybe even the specie for accuracy.

            See
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrochronology
            http://www.sonic.net/bristlecone/dendro.html

            TTFN
            Ralg
            AnTir
          • barondevin@insightbb.com
            ... From: Conal O hAirt Jim Hart ... Half.com has it for $202.24 http://product.half.ebay.com/_W0QQcpidZ807489QQprZ561518 Devin
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...>
              > Anyone know anything about this book?
              >
              > Domestic Wooden Artifacts
              > by Caroline Earwood
              Half.com has it for $202.24
               
               
               
              Devin
            • barondevin@insightbb.com
              ... For that matter, Amazon has it for list, $95.00
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007

                > > Domestic Wooden Artifacts
                > > by Caroline Earwood
                >
                > Half.com has it for $202.24
                >
                For that matter, Amazon has it for list, $95.00
                 
                 
                Devin
              • leaking pen
                what he said. also, with radiocarbon, it only works if you can tie the wood to having grown in a certain area AND have confirmed wood from teh same time frame
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 5, 2007
                  what he said.

                  also, with radiocarbon, it only works if you can tie the wood to having grown in a certain area AND have confirmed wood from teh same time frame and place.

                  On Dec 5, 2007 8:37 PM, Ralph Lindberg < n7bsn@...> wrote:

                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tracy Swanson"


                  <tstar2000@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual
                  > tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the
                  annual
                  > tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of
                  where they
                  > grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been
                  > traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early
                  Middle Ages.
                  >
                  Actually yes, and it doesn't work like you describe.

                  It's called Dendrochronology, while it can be accurate, it requires
                  correlation to the growing area and maybe even the specie for accuracy.

                  See
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrochronology
                  http://www.sonic.net/bristlecone/dendro.html

                  TTFN
                  Ralg
                  AnTir




                  --
                  That which yields isn't always weak.
                • Bill McNutt
                  One of my colleagues here at the University of Tennessee was instrumental in developing the technique. Alas, it is not useable for furniture because you have
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 6, 2007

                    One of my colleagues here at the University of Tennessee was instrumental in developing the technique.  Alas, it is not useable for furniture because you have to get a core of so much of the original tree to get meaningful data.  They did use it on the Mary Rose timbers, though, to tell when the trees were felled to build her.  It helped nail down her construction dates.  The technique is called “dendrochronology.”

                     

                    Will

                     


                    From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tracy Swanson
                    Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2007 9:31 PM
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review

                     

                    Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the annual tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of where they grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early Middle Ages.

                     

                    Just thought this might be of interest...

                    In Magical Service,

                    Malaki


                     



                  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                    http://www.oxbowbooks.com/bookinfo.cfm/ID/6614 look here Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something Worthy ... From:
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 6, 2007
                      http://www.oxbowbooks.com/bookinfo.cfm/ID/6614

                      look here
                       
                      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                      Aude Aliquid Dignum
                      'Dare Something Worthy'


                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: "barondevin@..." <barondevin@...>
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, December 5, 2007 11:32:59 PM
                      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review



                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@yahoo. com>
                      > Anyone know anything about this book?
                      >
                      > Domestic Wooden Artifacts
                      > by Caroline Earwood
                      Half.com has it for $202.24
                       
                       
                       
                      Devin



                      Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                    • Jeff Johnson
                      While there is the limitation that (at best) you can only date a section of wood to the date when it was cut down, it s not true that it s not applicable to
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 7, 2007
                        While there is the limitation that (at best) you can only date a
                        section of wood to the date when it was cut down, it's not true that
                        it's not applicable to furniture. You can overlap know section
                        profiles with your sample and get a pattern match with just sections.

                        There's a very good description of the technique in "Die gotishen Truhen".

                        I was reading the dendrochronological report for an item at the Cluny
                        in Paris last week (brag). They were able to stack the individual
                        pieces in such a way that they could reconstruct the section of log
                        the pieces came from, giving a very complete cross section on which
                        they could base their analysis.

                        Jeff J /Geoff Bourette

                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > One of my colleagues here at the University of Tennessee was
                        instrumental in
                        > developing the technique. Alas, it is not useable for furniture
                        because you
                        > have to get a core of so much of the original tree to get meaningful
                        data.
                        > They did use it on the Mary Rose timbers, though, to tell when the trees
                        > were felled to build her. It helped nail down her construction
                        dates. The
                        > technique is called "dendrochronology."
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Will
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > _____
                        >
                        > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tracy Swanson
                        > Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2007 9:31 PM
                        > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual
                        > tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the
                        annual
                        > tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of
                        where they
                        > grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been
                        > traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early
                        Middle Ages.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Just thought this might be of interest...
                        >
                        > In Magical Service,
                        >
                        > Malaki
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=6200723/grpspId=1705126283/msgId
                        > =9434/stime=1196905331/nc1=5008815/nc2=3848614/nc3=4840951>
                        >
                      • Bill McNutt
                        Sure. But it s not applicable as a commercial technique for dating antiques, which was my point. Will _____ From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 7, 2007

                          Sure.  But it’s not applicable as a commercial technique for dating antiques, which was my point.

                           

                          Will

                           


                          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jeff Johnson
                          Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 7:02 AM
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Looking for a book review

                           

                          While there is the limitation that (at best) you can only date a
                          section of wood to the date when it was cut down, it's not true that
                          it's not applicable to furniture. You can overlap know section
                          profiles with your sample and get a pattern match with just sections.

                          There's a very good description of the technique in "Die gotishen Truhen".

                          I was reading the dendrochronological report for an item at the Cluny
                          in Paris last week (brag). They were able to stack the individual
                          pieces in such a way that they could reconstruct the section of log
                          the pieces came from, giving a very complete cross section on which
                          they could base their analysis.

                          Jeff J /Geoff Bourette

                          --- In medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com, "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...> wrote:

                          >
                          > One of my colleagues here at the
                          w:st="on">University of Tennessee was
                          instrumental in
                          > developing the technique. Alas, it is not useable for furniture
                          because you
                          > have to get a core of so much of the original tree to get meaningful
                          data.
                          > They did use it on the Mary Rose timbers, though, to tell when the trees
                          > were felled to build her. It helped nail down her construction
                          dates. The
                          > technique is called "dendrochronology. "
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Will
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > _____
                          >
                          > From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          > [mailto:medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com]
                          On Behalf Of Tracy Swanson
                          > Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2007 9:31 PM
                          > To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual
                          > tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the
                          annual
                          > tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of
                          where they
                          > grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been
                          > traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early
                          Middle Ages.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Just thought this might be of interest...
                          >
                          > In Magical Service,
                          >
                          > Malaki
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          <http://geo.yahoo. com/serv? s=97359714/ grpId=6200723/ grpspId=17051262 83/msgId
                          > =9434/stime= 1196905331/ nc1=5008815/ nc2=3848614/ nc3=4840951>
                          >

                        • Andrew Wilkinson
                          If you do a web search for Dendochronology you should be able to find the information on calibrating tree ring dates. Dendochronology is a very useful
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 7, 2007

                            If you do a web search for Dendochronology you should be able to find the information on calibrating tree ring dates. Dendochronology is a very useful technique in many circumstances, however in some climates, and with some species of tree there are difficulties. For example in Australia tree growth is measured through seasonal changes rather than annual rings as there can be some years between growth. A second problem with dendochronology is that generally a core is required which is destructive. This technique has been used to advantage in dating timber frames in medieval housing.

                             

                             


                            From: medievaThios lsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill McNutt
                            Sent: Friday, 7 December 2007 1:38 AM
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review

                             

                            One of my colleagues here at the University of Tennessee was instrumental in developing the technique.  Alas, it is not useable for furniture because you have to get a core of so much of the original tree to get meaningful data.  They did use it on the Mary Rose timbers, though, to tell when the trees were felled to build her.  It helped nail down her construction dates.  The technique is called “dendrochronology.”

                             

                            Will

                             


                            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tracy Swanson
                            Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2007 9:31 PM
                            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Looking for a book review

                             

                            Speaking of dating wooden artifacts, has anyone else heard of the annual tree ring record method of dating? It is supposed to rely upon the annual tree ring growth record. It seems that all trees, regardless of where they grow, have a relative annual growth ring thickness record that has been traced, from what I've heard, at least as far back as the early Middle Ages.

                             

                            Just thought this might be of interest...

                            In Magical Service,

                            Malaki


                             

                          • windsingersmoon
                            I own the book. If you get it you will pay a pretty penny (it ran me 80 $ plus shipping, when I ordered it sight-unseen about 7 - 8 years ago) My feelings
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 31, 2007
                              I own the book.

                              If you get it you will pay a pretty penny (it ran me 80 $ plus
                              shipping, when I ordered it sight-unseen about 7 - 8 years ago)

                              My feelings about the book when it arrived,...were mixed.
                              For that price,....I had expected far more in the way of
                              illustrations. (the source I had ordered from had not told How many
                              illustrations,.......it had said something like 'Richly illustrated'
                              which I had taken to mean more than 136 in a 300 page book)

                              What illustrations there Are in the book,...are well-drawn line
                              drawings with handy guage (?) to determine the measurements.

                              There are a number of pices that were quite new to me,...includeing a
                              triangular hanging bowl I think is really cool and want to re-create
                              as soon as a can find a piece of wood larege enough to make mine full-
                              sized.

                              Earwood seems facinated with, and has written quite a bit on the
                              subject of 'bog-butter' often found in wooden containers buried in
                              peat bogs (inspiring me, at one point,....to go buring a wooden bowl
                              full of butter in my own mini-peat bog,........which I totally forgot
                              about until this moment) That was at least 5 years ago,...so I guess
                              it's time to check on it)

                              Would I have bought the book for that price,...if I could have viewed
                              it first ? Probably not.

                              While I was delighted to have fresh material to reproduce,.....I
                              can't say I felt like I got my money's worth in the book,....but I
                              bit the bullet on it.

                              It's an interesting read though,.....In time,..I read it cover to
                              cover,....rather unusual for me to do that with that sort of book
                              where my primary interest is usually in the visual material.
                              Shara/aka Asa of the Wood
                              myspace.com/windsingersmoon




                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                              <baronconal@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Anyone know anything about this book?
                              >
                              > Domestic Wooden Artifacts
                              > by Caroline Earwood
                              > Radiocarbon dating has made possible a
                              > chronology for the hundreds of previously undated wooden artefacts
                              > found during the drainage works and peat diggings in 19th and 20th
                              > century Ireland and Scotland. Using these results this book is able
                              to
                              > analyse the developments in manufacturing methods of domestic wooden
                              > artefacts in Britain and Ireland from the Neolithic to the end of
                              the
                              > first millennium AD. The distribution of artefacts - chronologically
                              > and geographically - and the organisation of manufacture and the
                              > cultural context are analysed and discussed, and comparison with
                              > European types made. The relationships between function, style and
                              > value of wooden artefacts and those made of metal, pottery and stone
                              > are also examined. `One of the most refreshing and stimulating
                              recent
                              > books on British archaeology' - Current Archaeolgy. 300p with 136
                              figs & illus. (Exeter UP 1993)
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                              >
                              > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                              > 'Dare Something Worthy'
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • windsingersmoon
                              A quick question,........ What did you hope to learn about the book when you asked for a review ? Noticeing Master William s reply and others, since your
                              Message 14 of 14 , Dec 31, 2007
                                A quick question,........

                                What did you hope to learn about the book when you asked for
                                a 'review' ? Noticeing Master William's reply and others, since
                                your question,.....I may have mis-understood what you wanted to know
                                about it.

                                In order to give you a better 'review' I'd have to go retrieve it
                                from my shop and that's a hike through the woods.

                                It's been a busy last 4 or 5 years for us,...trying to rescue what
                                we've been able to rescue from our old house (where the roof gave)
                                and get a new home built,...so I confess,....my woodcarving and
                                research time has had to take a back seat to other priorities,...i.e
                                survival and rescue.
                                (But I saved most of my woodworking books (not all,...and water got
                                into the huge bin my 100 Plus Viking books were stored,...and I lost
                                about half of those,....most of my best woodworking books were saved
                                and dry,....includeing the Earwood book,........the last several
                                years have proved both trying and interesting....)
                                Shara
                                myspace.com/windsingersmoon

                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                                <baronconal@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Anyone know anything about this book?
                                >
                                > Domestic Wooden Artifacts
                                > by Caroline Earwood
                                > Radiocarbon dating has made possible a
                                > chronology for the hundreds of previously undated wooden artefacts
                                > found during the drainage works and peat diggings in 19th and 20th
                                > century Ireland and Scotland. Using these results this book is able
                                to
                                > analyse the developments in manufacturing methods of domestic wooden
                                > artefacts in Britain and Ireland from the Neolithic to the end of
                                the
                                > first millennium AD. The distribution of artefacts - chronologically
                                > and geographically - and the organisation of manufacture and the
                                > cultural context are analysed and discussed, and comparison with
                                > European types made. The relationships between function, style and
                                > value of wooden artefacts and those made of metal, pottery and stone
                                > are also examined. `One of the most refreshing and stimulating
                                recent
                                > books on British archaeology' - Current Archaeolgy. 300p with 136
                                figs & illus. (Exeter UP 1993)
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                                >
                                > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                                > 'Dare Something Worthy'
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                ______________________________________________________________________
                                ______________
                                > Looking for last minute shopping deals?
                                > Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.
                                http://tools.search.yahoo.com/newsearch/category.php?category=shopping
                                >
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.