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  • RLN37
    I live in a very small town in central North Dakota. Finding a hardwood supplier anywhere within driving distance here is next to impossible. So I look on
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 1, 2007
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      I live in a very small town in central North Dakota. Finding a
      hardwood supplier anywhere within driving distance here is next to
      impossible. So I look on the internet. But you have to very careful
      about shipping costs. Does anyone know of a high-quality supplier of
      maple, oak, walnut, cherry, etc., with reasonable shipping charges? I
      don't mind paying a little more than I would if I came to the
      supplier, but shipping can get out of hand when the seller seems to
      make it his real profit center. Guidance from anyone with real
      experience in this difficult topic would be most appreciated.

      Christmas cheers from Baseball Bob
    • Rhys Terafan Greydragon
      Greetings all, I am hoping someone knows a good trick for octagonalizing a sloped piece of wood. I have a 3 x 3 that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x
      Message 2 of 10 , Dec 2, 2007
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        Greetings all,
         
            I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a sloped piece of wood.
         
        I have a 3 x 3  that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x 1.5...    (that is what I want). 
         
         
        What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even and all narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end.    Anyone have any tips, tricks, or good ideas??  
         
         
        I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking for a power-tool-method...
         

        cheers,
           Terafan
         
        Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon     terafan@...
        Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't remember...
         

      • James Winkler
        I saw this done (haven t done it myself. so I m a little short on the subtleties that may be involved) once using a gig that was set up for a table saw. I
        Message 3 of 10 , Dec 2, 2007
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          I saw this done (haven’t done it myself… so I’m a little short on the subtleties that  may be involved) once using a gig that was set up for a table saw.   I think it was Norm Abrams that did it.   Basically he made a sliding panel that had a fence that could be set to the appropriate taper angle.  He mounted the piece in it and ripped it on a table saw.  The work piece could be clamped to the sled and the fence secured so it didn’t slip during cutting.

           

          Now… if I remember correctly… he only did a square taper…  there will be other issues associated with the second set of taper cuts…  may require a second gig to accommodate the piece securely.

           

          It’s been a long time since I saw the show so I’m a little fuzzy on some of the specifics… but the basic gig construction kinda’ stuck in my mind.

           

          That’s about all I remember…  you didn’t mention how long the piece was you wanted to “octagonalize”…  so I don’t know if length is going to be an issue this way or not.

           

          Some woodworking stores sell those plastic pieces that are designed to run in the guide tracks on saw tables… plastic is good because it is less inclined to ‘bind’ in the track… as long as it’s mounted straight.

           

          Hope this helps…

          Chas.

        • James Winkler
          Ummm. it also occurred to me that it might be possible (given the dimensions of the piece) to simply build a box jig with a guide on the top where you could
          Message 4 of 10 , Dec 2, 2007
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            Ummm…  it also occurred to me that it might be possible (given the dimensions of the piece) to simply build a box jig with a guide on the top where you could take a router with a long straight trimming bit and shave off the material on the other four sides (rotating the piece 90 deg for each cut).

             

            Just a thought…

             

            Chas.,___

          • Geffrei Maudeleyne
            Consider use of a tapering jig. Also, experiment with making a cut then use masking tape and tape it back together, turn and make another cut. As Always, Yours
            Message 5 of 10 , Dec 3, 2007
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              Consider use of a tapering jig. Also, experiment with making a cut then use masking tape and tape it back together, turn and make another cut.

               

              As Always, Yours In Service to the Dream,

              Geffrei Maudeleyne

               


              From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rhys Terafan Greydragon
              Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 10:18 PM
              To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Cutting octagonals on a slope

               

              Greetings all,

               

                  I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a sloped piece of wood.

               

              I have a 3 x 3  that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x 1.5...    (that is what I want). 

               

               

              What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even and all narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end.    Anyone have any tips, tricks, or good ideas??  

               

               

              I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking for a power-tool-method. ..

               

              cheers,
                 Terafan
               
              Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon     terafan@greydragon. org
              Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't remember...
               

            • Dale Compton
              If you have it all measured and marked already you could use a table saw. Clamp the working piece to the edge of a wider plank (I use 1/4 inch plywood) for
              Message 6 of 10 , Dec 3, 2007
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                      If you have it all measured and marked already you could use a table saw. Clamp the working piece to the edge of a wider plank (I use 1/4 inch plywood) for ease of handling, sort of a jig Angle the blade at 45 or what every angle you need. This can be checked by pushing your work up to the blade when it is not turned on to be sure of the degree of angle you require.
                 
                  Then again, doing it by hand with a shave horse is period :)
                see you at Cutlass' and Corsairs
                 
                Innis


                From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Rhys Terafan Greydragon
                Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2007 10:18 PM
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Cutting octagonals on a slope

                Greetings all,
                 
                    I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a sloped piece of wood.
                 
                I have a 3 x 3  that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x 1.5...    (that is what I want). 
                 
                 
                What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even and all narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end.    Anyone have any tips, tricks, or good ideas??  
                 
                 
                I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking for a power-tool-method. ..
                 

                cheers,
                   Terafan
                 
                Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon     terafan@greydragon. org
                Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't remember...
                 

              • Dale Compton
                I have not seen that, maybe I will give it a try since I dont use my router enough at this time. Innis _____ From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Message 7 of 10 , Dec 3, 2007
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                     I have not seen that, maybe I will give it a try since I dont use my router enough at this time.
                   
                  Innis


                  From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James Winkler
                  Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 12:30 AM
                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Cutting octagonals on a slope

                  Ummm…  it also occurred to me that it might be possible (given the dimensions of the piece) to simply build a box jig with a guide on the top where you could take a router with a long straight trimming bit and shave off the material on the other four sides (rotating the piece 90 deg for each cut).

                  Just a thought…

                  Chas.,___

                • Don Eisele
                  For this math to work: 1) Save the cutoff, then tape it back on afterwards to keep two flat sides - one flat on the tablesaw, one flat on your taper jig. (if
                  Message 8 of 10 , Dec 3, 2007
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                    For this math to work:
                    1) Save the cutoff, then tape it back on afterwards to keep two flat sides -
                    one flat on the tablesaw, one flat on your taper jig.
                    (if the cutoff is too small, cut something out of scrap to use)
                    You don't have to keep the octagonal cuts, as the calculations are based on
                    your original flat sides.

                    2) I assume you have a taper jig which you used to make the first tapers.

                    Taper T
                    sides S: 8

                    Angle A = 90-(180/S)

                    taper jig J: atan(sin(T)/tan(S))
                    blade tilt B: asin(cos(S)*cos(T))

                    These numbers give you half the angle, so multiply times two (I was using them
                    for tapering staves).


                    Example:
                    3x3 -> 1.5x1.5 = .75 taper per side @ (unknown distance).
                    assuming table height of approximately 30" we'd get:

                    T = atan(.75/30) = 1.432deg
                    A = 90-(180/8) = 67.5 deg
                    J = .593deg
                    B = 22.493deg

                    So, your blade should be at 44.985degrees (might as well be 45),
                    and your taper jig at 1.186deg

                    I haven't actually done this for outside cuts like you are doing, but I'm
                    fairly sure the math works the same compared to the mugs I was making.


                    On Sun, Dec 02, 2007 at 09:17:37PM -0600, Rhys Terafan Greydragon did say:
                    > Greetings all,
                    >
                    > I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a sloped
                    > piece of wood.
                    >
                    > I have a 3 x 3 that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x 1.5...
                    > (that is what I want).
                    >
                    >
                    > What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even and all
                    > narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end. Anyone have any
                    > tips, tricks, or good ideas??
                    >
                    >
                    > I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking for a
                    > power-tool-method...
                    >
                    >
                    > cheers,
                    > Terafan
                    >
                    > Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon terafan@...
                    > Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't remember...
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >References
                    >
                    > Visible links
                    > 1. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/message/9408;_ylc=X3oDMTM0OGJ0aW1pBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBG1zZ0lkAzk0MTEEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDdnRwYwRzdGltZQMxMTk2NjUxODk5BHRwY0lkAzk0MDg-
                    > 2. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJwN28zMTY1BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBG1zZ0lkAzk0MTEEc2VjA2Z0cgRzbGsDcnBseQRzdGltZQMxMTk2NjUxODk5?act=reply&messageNum=9411
                    > 3. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJlamlqbTNkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTE5NjY1MTg5OQ--
                    > 4. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/messages;_ylc=X3oDMTJldjdkbzQ0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA21zZ3MEc3RpbWUDMTE5NjY1MTg5OQ--
                    > 5. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/files;_ylc=X3oDMTJmbTV0YXA4BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2ZpbGVzBHN0aW1lAzExOTY2NTE4OTk-
                    > 6. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/photos;_ylc=X3oDMTJlbHRscjh0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Bob3QEc3RpbWUDMTE5NjY1MTg5OQ--
                    > 7. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/links;_ylc=X3oDMTJmaTU3dWk0BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2xpbmtzBHN0aW1lAzExOTY2NTE4OTk-
                    > 8. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/database;_ylc=X3oDMTJjZGNvaGliBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2RiBHN0aW1lAzExOTY2NTE4OTk-
                    > 9. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/polls;_ylc=X3oDMTJmNXBidG1xBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3BvbGxzBHN0aW1lAzExOTY2NTE4OTk-
                    > 10. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJlbmY5bzNyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA21icnMEc3RpbWUDMTE5NjY1MTg5OQ--
                    > 11. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/calendar;_ylc=X3oDMTJkbW9haGMzBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2NhbARzdGltZQMxMTk2NjUxODk5
                    > 12. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/
                    > 13. http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkMHRyN3I0BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMTk2NjUxODk5
                    > 14. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/join;_ylc=X3oDMTJmZWwwMW8wBF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3N0bmdzBHN0aW1lAzExOTY2NTE4OTk-
                    > 15. mailto:medievalsawdust-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email Delivery: Digest
                    > 16. mailto:medievalsawdust-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change Delivery Format: Traditional
                    > 17. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust;_ylc=X3oDMTJkNGpsYjd1BF9TAzk3NDc2NTkwBGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2hwZgRzdGltZQMxMTk2NjUxODk5
                    > 18. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    > 19. mailto:medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=
                    > 20. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust;_ylc=X3oDMTJlNTZoaTdqBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzYyMDA3MjMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTI2MjgzBHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTE5NjY1MTg5OQ--
                    > 21. http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=12j3s2boe/M=493064.11711023.12182481.9963301/D=groups/S=1705126283:NC/Y=YAHOO/EXP=1196659099/A=5008815/R=0/SIG=10sulld0b/*http://starwars.yahoo.com/
                    > 22. http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=12j2lc3ae/M=493064.10729659.12153716.8674578/D=groups/S=1705126283:NC/Y=YAHOO/EXP=1196659099/A=3848614/R=0/SIG=12t4qk00m/*http://news.yahoo.com/i/757;_ylt=A9FJqYzfwK5EFCQAswis0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3NW1oMDRpBHNlYwM3NTc-
                    > 23. http://us.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=12j5q4ssa/M=493064.11135488.11710474.8674578/D=groups/S=1705126283:NC/Y=YAHOO/EXP=1196659099/A=4776367/R=0/SIG=11mj2s6kj/*http://advision.webevents.yahoo.com/green/index.html

                    --
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                    "I ought not to let my mind wander, as it's too small to go off by itself"
                    WebSune Card search engine: http://toysmakeuspowerful.com/search
                    Card auctions: http://imperialblock.com
                    Kansas Gamer: http://ksgamer.com
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                    TengaiCON/F.A.N.G Organizational president: http://tengaicon.com
                  • jay sabath
                    Rhys, Consider using a band saw with a tapering jig. Cut each of the tapers but do NOT cut all the way through. leave some room at the bottom and shut off
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 3, 2007
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                      Rhys,

                      Consider using a band saw with a tapering jig.  Cut each of the tapers but do NOT cut all the way through.  leave some room at the bottom and shut off the saw and pull the piece off and give it a turn   If you leave about 1/2 an inch still connected you still have a complete thickness at both ends of the piece which should allow it to be solid in the jig.  

                      You can then cut through the rest of the way with a tool of choice or if you start with the piece about 1 inch longer, you can very carefully cut off that last inch with a power miter / chop saw.

                      Please work out any problems out on a test piece first. And let us know how which ever idea you use works out.

                      Johannes Machiavelli  



                      On Dec 2, 2007 9:17 PM, Rhys Terafan Greydragon < terafan@...> wrote:

                      Greetings all,
                       
                          I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a sloped piece of wood.
                       
                      I have a 3 x 3  that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x 1.5...    (that is what I want). 
                       
                       
                      What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even and all narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end.    Anyone have any tips, tricks, or good ideas??  
                       
                       
                      I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking for a power-tool-method...
                       

                      cheers,
                         Terafan
                       
                      Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon     terafan@...
                      Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't remember...
                       


                      -- 
                      Lord Johannes Machiavelli
                      Shire of Rokkehealden
                      Kingdom of the Middle


                    • paul
                      If you have assess to a good library there is an article in Wooden Boat #91 on mast building that includes a very simple tool to scribe accurate lines for
                      Message 10 of 10 , Dec 4, 2007
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                        If you have assess to a good library there is an article in Wooden Boat
                        #91 on mast building that includes a very simple tool to scribe accurate
                        lines for octagonalizing a timber. The relevant couple of sentances are

                        Start by taking the mast from a rectangular to an octagonal section.
                        For our mast we made a set of simple marking gauges from scraps of 3/4x1
                        1/2 lumber, with finish nails for the guide pins and scribers. In use,
                        the gauges are held diagonally across the mast, the guide pins
                        determining the angle. As this angle changes with the dimensions of the
                        mast, the gauge automatically divides the face into the correct
                        proportions for the octagonal section. The circular saw was used to
                        rough out the octagonal shape. Be careful here - make sure you don't
                        stray inside the guidelines. The jointer plane is ideal for completing
                        this stage accurately.

                        I don't know if I can do an accurate drawing but it looks something like
                        this.


                        -----------------------------
                        l
                        l Scrap lumber
                        -------------------------------------------
                        l l l
                        l short internal nails are the scribers
                        l
                        l long external nails are the guide pins
                        a b c


                        Hope that helps. If necessary I can scan and send the two pages from
                        that article about it.

                        Iain Qwhewyl



                        jay sabath wrote:
                        >
                        > Rhys,
                        >
                        >
                        > Consider using a band saw with a tapering jig. Cut each of the tapers
                        > but do NOT cut all the way through. leave some room at the bottom and
                        > shut off the saw and pull the piece off and give it a turn If you
                        > leave about 1/2 an inch still connected you still have a complete
                        > thickness at both ends of the piece which should allow it to be solid
                        > in the jig.
                        >
                        > You can then cut through the rest of the way with a tool of choice or
                        > if you start with the piece about 1 inch longer, you can very
                        > carefully cut off that last inch with a power miter / chop saw.
                        >
                        > Please work out any problems out on a test piece first. And let us
                        > know how which ever idea you use works out.
                        >
                        > Johannes Machiavelli
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On Dec 2, 2007 9:17 PM, Rhys Terafan Greydragon <
                        > terafan@... <mailto:terafan@...>> wrote:
                        >
                        > Greetings all,
                        >
                        > I am hoping someone knows a good trick for "octagonalizing" a
                        > sloped piece of wood.
                        >
                        > I have a 3 x 3 that is sloped on all 4 sides down to 1.5 x
                        > 1.5... (that is what I want).
                        >
                        >
                        > What I now want to do is octagonalize it so all 8 sides are even
                        > and all narrow down evenly from the big end to the small end.
                        > Anyone have any tips, tricks, or good ideas??
                        >
                        >
                        > I can do it with a drawknife and a spokeshave, but I am looking
                        > for a power-tool-method...
                        >
                        >
                        > cheers,
                        > Terafan
                        >
                        > Master Rhys Terafan Greydragon terafan@...
                        > <mailto:terafan@...>
                        > Brewer, Tent and Furniture maker, and other things I can't
                        > remember...
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > Lord Johannes Machiavelli
                        > Shire of Rokkehealden
                        > Kingdom of the Middle
                        >
                        >
                        >
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