Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

A question on lathe tools

Expand Messages
  • Bill Brown
    Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
    • 0 Attachment

      Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for family and friend.

       

      Domingos

    • leaking pen
      both. crap tools that lose their edge fast or arent properly shaped and dont fit the hand to begin with will be horrible to work with no matter how good you
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        both.  crap tools that lose their edge fast or arent properly shaped and dont fit the hand to begin with will be horrible to work with no matter how good you are, but also, you could have the best tools, and if you dont know how to use them... whats the point?
         

        you will start to find yourself making your own tools a lot, for certain things, but to start, the normal skews and gouges that are part of any lath turners toolkit will do it.
         
        On 11/26/07, Bill Brown <stickbow@...> wrote:

        Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for family and friend.

         

        Domingos




        --
        That which yields isn't always weak.
      • James Winkler
        The Pen makes a lot of good points. good tools are any tool that will do what you want it to do. Today we re blessed with a whole minefield of specialized
        Message 3 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
        • 0 Attachment

          The Pen makes a lot of good points…  good tools are any tool that will do what you want it to do.  Today we’re blessed with a whole minefield of specialized tools for turning…  maybe they make your life better… maybe they don’t.  Your ‘technique’ will determine what set you come up with.  I’ve got maybe a dozen turning tools… principally use maybe 4 or 5 of them. (Those… skews and gouges “The Pen” referes to…)…

           

          But… in that “technique” category you also have to include things like:

           

          Sharpening

          Wood selection and management

          Choosing your own shape to the tools

          Position and speed.

           

          The first lesson that I learned when I started turning was that if you ask any 12 turners how to do a specific task you’ll probably end up with at least 24 different opinions.

           

          Chas.

           

          (Oh… and a big tip o’ the dust filled cap to the good fella’ who asked about shellac being dissolvable in alcohol…   yea…  if you’re planning on drinking anything but water out of your cup, shellac might not be the best of options!!

           

        • Barbara Dodge
          I have been turning on an off for about 3 years now. My first set of turning tools was a set from Harbor Freight Tools that was $29.99 for a set of eight
          Message 4 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
             I have been turning on an off for about 3 years now.  My first set of turning tools was a set from Harbor Freight Tools that was $29.99 for a set of eight different tools.   The tools are of high speed steel and except for one, they still work rather well.  The one that I have trouble with happens to be a 1/4 inch spindle gouge that I experienced a nasty catch with.  That tool is now bent, still usable, but bent. 
             
            These tools were sufficient until I decided that turning for me wasn't just a passing fancy. I have invested in a number of more expensive tools, all made by Sorby.  I found that the handles are more comfortable to use, and they seem to me to be better balanced.
             
            I hope this helps,
            Felicia

          • leaking pen
            ive been using the same harbor frieght set. once i used them for a bit, i turned some new longer handles that fit my hand better, but thats it. ... -- That
            Message 5 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              ive been using the same harbor frieght set.  once i used them for a bit, i turned some new longer handles that fit my hand better, but thats it.

              On 11/26/07, Barbara Dodge <awench1@...> wrote:

               I have been turning on an off for about 3 years now.  My first set of turning tools was a set from Harbor Freight Tools that was $29.99 for a set of eight different tools.    The tools are of high speed steel and except for one, they still work rather well.  The one that I have trouble with happens to be a 1/4 inch spindle gouge that I experienced a nasty catch with.  That tool is now bent, still usable, but bent.  
               
              These tools were sufficient until I decided that turning for me wasn't just a passing fancy. I have invested in a number of more expensive tools, all made by Sorby.  I found that the handles are more comfortable to use, and they seem to me to be better balanced.
               
              I hope this helps,
              Felicia




              --
              That which yields isn't always weak.
            • Stuart Tingle
              I ve been using some cheap $25 chinese tools for the past few years. They are made of high speed steel and have suited me just fine in making the woodwind
              Message 6 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I've been using some cheap $25 chinese tools for the past few years.
                They are made of high speed steel and have suited me just fine in
                making the woodwind instruments that are the reason I got into turning
                in the first place. My only problem was the 1/2 inch gouge was
                unusable till I re-profiled it. That any my 1/2 inch skew had to be
                replaced a few months ago after a bad catch bent it and I realized
                after breaking out the new one that with resharpening it over 4 years
                it had gotten considerably shorter. The old one btw is still in use,
                bent back after softening, re-profiled to work deep inside conical
                instrument bells and re-hardened. They may be cheap, but they do a
                pretty good job.

                Far as tools in general are concerned, you can and dependant on what
                you make, WILL make your own tools, amazing what you can do with a
                modified angled screw driver for working inside drone bells. I also
                use a cheap $15 pack of teensy carving chisels for fine detail work.
                Many things that were never intended for use on a lathe can be adapted
                to do great jobs. IE the metal toothed dog comb that I use to do
                combings on a highland style bagpipe..

                Aleyn
                A firm believer in make it yourself, rather than just throw money at it.



                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Brown" <stickbow@...> wrote:
                >
                > Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the
                utmost
                > important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is
                it like
                > a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is
                there some
                > gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type
                stuff for
                > family and friend.
                >
                >
                >
                > Domingos
                >
              • Rebekah d'Avignon
                You are going to get a slew of answers on this one. Let me say this: You can spend $1,000s on tools, but if you don t have the skill - they won t help much.
                Message 7 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  You are going to get a slew of answers on this one. Let me say this: You can spend $1,000s on tools, but if you don't have the skill - they won't help much. Sort of like kids who can't make a free-throw, but want $200 tennis shoes. With Good, Better, and Best tools available - a beginner will be more likely to ruin the Best with poor sharpening skills. IMHO it might be better in the beginning to practice using the tools on a piece of scrap wood and get the technique down (ie, get comfortable with the whole process) before trying to make something that matches "the picture in the book".


                  Bill Brown <stickbow@...> wrote:
                  Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for family and friend.
                  Domingos



                  Things given in excess are not valued as highly as things that are earned.


                  Get easy, one-click access to your favorites. Make Yahoo! your homepage.

                • Arthur Slaughter
                  For face plate work I use P&N tools from Lee Valley . I like turning the handles to fit my style. The rest I tend to forge myself. THL Finnr To:
                  Message 8 of 20 , Nov 26, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    For face plate work I use P&N tools from Lee Valley . I like turning the handles to fit my style.  The rest I tend to forge myself.
                    THL Finnr


                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    From: stickbow@...
                    Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 15:15:53 -0600
                    Subject: [MedievalSawdust] A question on lathe tools


                    Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for family and friend.

                     

                    Domingos



                    Get the power of Windows + Web with the new Windows Live. Power up!
                  • Chuck Phillips
                    I ve found that good technique and skill can make up for poor tools, while a poor user will make a mess of anything they touch. Fortunately, technique can be
                    Message 9 of 20 , Nov 27, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment

                      I’ve found that good technique and skill can make up for poor tools, while a poor user will make a mess of anything they touch.  Fortunately, technique can be learned.  If you are just starting, buy tools that are good enough that you aren’t fighting them without spending money on production turner’s specialist tools.  For the sort of work you are intending, (platters and bowls, right?)  a bowl gouge and a scraper will suffice.

                       

                      As your skill level increases and you find yourself running into limitations of your current tools, consider spending money on the best you can afford.  A friend once told me “If you get the best tools, you only cry once.”  A lot of what you get with the high-end tools is edge-holding ability. 

                       

                      The tools you will find yourself making most (unless you enjoy forge work) are work holders.  As an example, when turning a platter, one side can be done while fastened to a faceplate, but getting a clean finish on the other side is easiest done with a jam chuck.  This can be as simple as a faceplate with a piece of sacrificial MDF attached.  When you flip the platter over, cut a recess in the MDF that is a press fit for the rim.  Now the entire base is accessible.  Most of the fancy specialist tools you find in the catalogs are designed to make a specific task easier.

                       

                      Charles Joiner

                      Caid  (Not very active these days.)

                       

                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Brown
                      Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 1:16 PM
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] A question on lathe tools

                       

                      Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for family and friend.

                       

                      Domingos

                    • Ralph Lindberg
                      Domingos You ve had some good advice, so far, so now for some that might not be as good... Avoid the Harbor Freight tools, that have the tan/white handles
                      Message 10 of 20 , Dec 5, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Domingos

                        You've had some good advice, so far, so now for some that might not be
                        as good...

                        Avoid the Harbor Freight tools, that have the tan/white handles (these
                        are sold both at the stores and via mail-order). If you buy HF tools
                        get the RED handled ones. These are only available via the stores. The
                        steel in these is much better, but still cheap ($40 for the set as I
                        recall)

                        Another good option, in the "cheap" tools is Benjamin's Best, imported
                        by PennState, but sold by a number of firms. Of similar quality is
                        Bodger, imported by Highland Hardware.

                        The advise you got to buy quality tools can also be good, -if- you
                        already know how to sharpen lathe tools (especially bowl and detail
                        gouges). If you don't, stay with cheap tools at first. Better to grind
                        away cheap steel, then expensive steel.

                        If you really want to be serious about learning to turn, look into
                        joining your local chapter of the AAW (assuming you live in North
                        America). http://www.woodturner.org/

                        One last point... in period they used an entire different type of
                        chisels then we do today.

                        TTFN
                        Ralg
                        AnTir
                      • leaking pen
                        i use the red handled lathe tools as well. ive made a few of them longer handles, but otherwise, very happy with them. ... -- That which yields isn t always
                        Message 11 of 20 , Dec 5, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          i use the red handled lathe tools as well.  ive made a few of them longer handles, but otherwise, very happy with them.

                          On Dec 5, 2007 8:53 PM, Ralph Lindberg < n7bsn@...> wrote:


                          Domingos

                          You've had some good advice, so far, so now for some that might not be
                          as good...

                          Avoid the Harbor Freight tools, that have the tan/white handles (these
                          are sold both at the stores and via mail-order). If you buy HF tools
                          get the RED handled ones. These are only available via the stores. The
                          steel in these is much better, but still cheap ($40 for the set as I
                          recall)

                          Another good option, in the "cheap" tools is Benjamin's Best, imported
                          by PennState, but sold by a number of firms. Of similar quality is
                          Bodger, imported by Highland Hardware.

                          The advise you got to buy quality tools can also be good, -if- you
                          already know how to sharpen lathe tools (especially bowl and detail
                          gouges). If you don't, stay with cheap tools at first. Better to grind
                          away cheap steel, then expensive steel.

                          If you really want to be serious about learning to turn, look into
                          joining your local chapter of the AAW (assuming you live in North
                          America). http://www.woodturner.org/

                          One last point... in period they used an entire different type of
                          chisels then we do today.

                          TTFN
                          Ralg
                          AnTir




                          --
                          That which yields isn't always weak.
                        • Stuart Tingle
                          ... Okay, I ll bite, so, what were the chisels like in period? Aleyn Cragmere AnTir
                          Message 12 of 20 , Dec 5, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Lindberg" <n7bsn@...>
                            wrote:

                            > One last point... in period they used an entire different type of
                            > chisels then we do today.
                            >


                            Okay, I'll bite, so, what were the chisels like in period?


                            Aleyn
                            Cragmere
                            AnTir
                          • Ralph Lindberg
                            ... Hook chisels mostly For reference see Robin Wood s book The Wooden Bowl , or see his web-site at http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/turnframe.htm Actually, if
                            Message 13 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stuart Tingle" <stu.shan@...>
                              wrote:

                              >
                              > Okay, I'll bite, so, what were the chisels like in period?
                              >

                              Hook chisels mostly
                              For reference see Robin Wood's book "The Wooden Bowl", or see his
                              web-site at http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/turnframe.htm

                              Actually, if you wanted to use a hook chisel yourself, there is a
                              source really close. Just drive up to Comox to Island Wood Craft
                              (http://www.islandwoodcraft.ca/) and enjoy.
                              I should note that the hook chisel they sell is designed for turning
                              the inside of small boxes
                              I should also warn you that it can be a very expensive place to
                              visit (yup, I've been there).

                              I come up to the Parksville area fairly often, I've made a few
                              practices and even one event! (unusual, since my schedule almost never
                              matches what is going on up there)

                              TTFN
                              Ralg
                              Dragons Laire
                              AnTir
                            • Stuart Tingle
                              ... Thanks, I have a better idea now. ... Yeah, they are two blocks down the street from my home. I wish I could afford their wonderful toys, but no. also, I
                              Message 14 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Lindberg" <n7bsn@...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > Hook chisels mostly
                                > For reference see Robin Wood's book "The Wooden Bowl", or see his
                                > web-site at http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/turnframe.htm
                                >

                                Thanks, I have a better idea now.

                                > Actually, if you wanted to use a hook chisel yourself, there is a
                                > source really close. Just drive up to Comox to Island Wood Craft
                                > (http://www.islandwoodcraft.ca/) and enjoy.
                                > I should note that the hook chisel they sell is designed for turning

                                Yeah, they are two blocks down the street from my home. I wish I could
                                afford their wonderful toys, but no. also, I mostly do reeded
                                woodwinds and they are always confused and bemused when I go looking
                                for tools. (try asking them about d-bit drills some time when you want
                                to yank a chain) Then when they are finished looking lost I just go
                                home and make what I need instead. Ask them about bowl or goblet
                                turning and tools however and they are awesome, but deviate sideways a
                                bit....


                                > I come up to the Parksville area fairly often, I've made a few
                                > practices and even one event! (unusual, since my schedule almost
                                >never matches what is going on up there)

                                Myself I rarely get to just drop down to Hartwood anymore, used to go
                                to every event I could down there, due to gas prices, and mostly play
                                here in Cragmere except for the odd event of course. Might run into
                                there one day or perhaps Seagirt. I'm the fellow usually flogging his
                                bagpipes, cornemuses, harps, lyres and their ilk. (next sales table,
                                kingdom 12th night, crass plug)

                                In Service

                                Aleyn
                                Shire of Cragmere
                                AnTir
                              • leaking pen
                                ohh, wow. those look like potters tools ive used. i actually wondered when i was first introduced to lathes, if tools like that would work. im glad to see
                                Message 15 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  ohh, wow.  those look like potters tools ive used.  i actually wondered when i was first introduced to lathes, if tools like that would work.  im glad to see they do.

                                  On Dec 6, 2007 5:13 PM, Ralph Lindberg < n7bsn@...> wrote:

                                  --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stuart Tingle" <stu.shan@...>


                                  wrote:

                                  >
                                  > Okay, I'll bite, so, what were the chisels like in period?
                                  >

                                  Hook chisels mostly
                                  For reference see Robin Wood's book "The Wooden Bowl", or see his
                                  web-site at http://www.robin-wood.co.uk/turnframe.htm

                                  Actually, if you wanted to use a hook chisel yourself, there is a
                                  source really close. Just drive up to Comox to Island Wood Craft
                                  (http://www.islandwoodcraft.ca/) and enjoy.
                                  I should note that the hook chisel they sell is designed for turning
                                  the inside of small boxes
                                  I should also warn you that it can be a very expensive place to
                                  visit (yup, I've been there).

                                  I come up to the Parksville area fairly often, I've made a few
                                  practices and even one event! (unusual, since my schedule almost never
                                  matches what is going on up there)

                                  TTFN
                                  Ralg
                                  Dragons Laire
                                  AnTir




                                  --
                                  That which yields isn't always weak.
                                • Stuart Tingle
                                  ... wondered when ... glad to ... Be great for bowl turning, but I cant see how they could be used in the spindle turning I use for making instruments however.
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                                    wrote:
                                    >
                                    > ohh, wow. those look like potters tools ive used. i actually
                                    wondered when
                                    > i was first introduced to lathes, if tools like that would work. im
                                    glad to
                                    > see they do.
                                    >

                                    Be great for bowl turning, but I cant see how they could be used in
                                    the spindle turning I use for making instruments however. If so, how?
                                    If not, what did they use?

                                    Aleyn
                                    shire of cragemere
                                    AnTir
                                  • Ralph Lindberg
                                    ... Depends.. I ve seen some photo s of Roman era chisels that look very modern, more like gouges and bedans. Also, you need to recall that when you are face
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stuart Tingle" <stu.shan@...>
                                      wrote:

                                      >
                                      > Be great for bowl turning, but I cant see how they could be used in
                                      > the spindle turning I use for making instruments however. If so, how?
                                      > If not, what did they use?
                                      >
                                      Depends.. I've seen some photo's of Roman era chisels that look very
                                      modern, more like gouges and bedans.

                                      Also, you need to recall that when you are face turning, the grain
                                      varies from end-on to side-on, and that spindle turning is primarily
                                      side-on. The cuts are very similar, which is why spindle gouges are
                                      similar to bowl gouges.

                                      From what I have been able to learn (and I am certainly no expert on
                                      period turning) there was spindle turning with hook chisels, designed
                                      for that purpose.

                                      TTFN
                                      Ralg
                                      An Tir
                                    • Ralph Lindberg
                                      ... I don t know my wallet could afford living two blocks from what I think of as the primer wood turning shop in Canada! ... It would be a long drive for a
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Stuart Tingle" <stu.shan@...>
                                        wrote:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Yeah, they are two blocks down the street from my home. I wish I could
                                        > afford their wonderful toys, but no.

                                        I don't know my wallet could afford living two blocks from what I
                                        think of as the primer wood turning shop in Canada!

                                        >
                                        > Myself I rarely get to just drop down to Hartwood anymore, used to go
                                        > to every event I could down there, due to gas prices..

                                        It would be a long drive for a "just the evening". The only reason I
                                        could go up was I had the afternoon off.

                                        >Might run into
                                        > there one day or perhaps Seagirt. I'm the fellow usually flogging his
                                        > bagpipes, cornemuses, harps, lyres and their ilk. (next sales table,
                                        > kingdom 12th night, crass plug)
                                        >
                                        I will look for you there.

                                        TTFN
                                        Ralg
                                        AnTir
                                      • leaking pen
                                        which instruments and parts in particular. for things like flutes and such, a set would be perfect for accent work and rounding. ... -- That which yields
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Dec 6, 2007
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          which instruments and parts in particular.  for things like flutes and such, a set would be perfect for accent work and rounding.


                                          On Dec 6, 2007 7:34 PM, Stuart Tingle < stu.shan@...> wrote:

                                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>


                                          wrote:
                                          >
                                          > ohh, wow. those look like potters tools ive used. i actually
                                          wondered when
                                          > i was first introduced to lathes, if tools like that would work. im
                                          glad to
                                          > see they do.
                                          >

                                          Be great for bowl turning, but I cant see how they could be used in
                                          the spindle turning I use for making instruments however. If so, how?
                                          If not, what did they use?

                                          Aleyn
                                          shire of cragemere
                                          AnTir




                                          --
                                          That which yields isn't always weak.
                                        • Peter Valentine
                                          Hmmm... there are opinions than there are turners.. but as its sound like are a beginner... and don t currently plan to make turning the center of your
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Mar 1, 2008
                                          • 0 Attachment

                                            Hmmm... there are opinions than there are turners.. but as its sound like are a beginner... and don't currently plan to make turning the center of your universe like some of us <sheepish grin> Lets go with simple and practical:

                                            1) Forget about making your own tools, it can be done and most serious turners end up making many tools, but you first need to exerience a good tool before you go about making them I think (after all you want to make feast gear and stuff and don't want to spend time making tools)

                                            2) Good tools are worth the money... cheap lightweight tools from companies like Harbor Freight and others may work OK, but I would advise go for quality over quantity. 

                                            3) By Feast Gear I am assuming that you want to make: Plates, Bowls, Goblets, Salt Cellars, Candle Sticks, etc... With this in mind you need to do a combination of faceplate and spindle turning.

                                            4) Do you have a WoodCraft store in your area?  Look them up, its is always better to put your hands on a tool before making a purchasing decision, and they usually have knowledge folks in their stores. (Employees AND customers) 

                                            4) Tools I would suggest to start with:

                                            • Roughing Gouge: This is the tool that roughs stock down to size... the bigger the better... for your bowls you will be working with rather large stock and its the mass of your roughing gouge that makes all the difference, the heavier the gouge the easier it will be to rough down stock, the tiny gouges the all in one "turning toolkits" give you are a waste of time.
                                            • Spindle Gouge: Fingernail profile gouges are nice in reducing catches.  Use this for detailed spindle work. Alternately you can use a "Skewchigouge" which is a cross between a skew and a gouge (sometimes called a tripoint tool).  This is a great all purpose tool.
                                            • Bowl Gouge: This tool is designed to reach in a remove alot of material  fast from the inside of your bowl... it is important to make this tool as massive as you can afford as well as mass again helps keep you from "catches". 
                                            • End Grain hollowing tool:  These can take many forms, I myself use a Sorby Multi-tip scraper most of the time to hollow with the carbide tip and then shear scrape to a final surface. 

                                            And from a minimalist perspective I would stop right there.  Purists will say you need to use skew, and that everything can be done using a skew (they are right to a degree) but skews require a much higher degree of skill to use correctly and are very unforgiving... I know several people who tried staring with skews and after several terrible catches they were frightened away from turning.

                                            There are some other "tools" which are equally important which are not gouges:

                                            • Sharpening:  I would advise a slow speed grinder with a coarse and fine stone and a "Wolverine Jig", there are many other ways to sharpen your tools, but this approach is fast and relatively foolproof, and without sharp tools, your turning experience will be a torturous one!  How often your will sharpen depends upon alot of factors, but I find that I am sharpening between each piece, and for some woods several times for a single piece.  Having this rig on hand means that sharpening your tools is only a matter of seconds and then you are back to turning.
                                            • Chuck:  Using a good chuck like a "Nova Chuck" or one from "Talon" is ciritical to bowl and end-work like goblets.  You need to be able to remove the tailstock and work into the end-grain for bowls and goblets and plates... and a good chuck cannot be replaced.  I use the Nova Chuck myself and am quite happy with it.  You can get attachments for screw chucking and different sized jaws for this chuck as well.. .so you can upgrade as you learn.

                                            Hope it helps,

                                            Wolfgang

                                            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Brown" <stickbow@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Simple question, what about lathe tools. Is quality of the tool the utmost
                                            > important or is technique? Also, what about making my own tools, is it like
                                            > a blacksmith in that you just make what works at the time or is there some
                                            > gotta have tools. I am looking at making mostly feast gear type stuff for
                                            > family and friend.
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > Domingos
                                            >

                                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.