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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Dovetails

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  • Larry Marshall
    ... Sure...but your assumptions seem to be 1) there was great consistency in the dovetail ratios being used, 2) that the craftsman cared even in the least bit
    Message 1 of 46 , Sep 6, 2003
      > material. He could observe what worked and what did not. He may
      > have been constrained under a guild system, but he wasn't blind.

      Sure...but your assumptions seem to be 1) there was great consistency in the
      dovetail ratios being used, 2) that the craftsman cared even in the least bit
      if the corners of his dovetails broke off and 3) that if one guy found a
      solution to breaking corners, everyone else would know about it. I think
      these are three false assumptions when you're talking about the 15th Century.

      > I was the head brewer for a small microbrewery. I was essentially
      > isolated, but that didn't prevent me from innovating my processes,

      And how many people knew about what you discovered? You've just made my
      point.

      > mostly by trial and error, but also by instinct. Processes I later
      > found out were standard throughout the industry and worked as I
      > figured out independently.

      Yep...and ultimately everyone would know. But in the Middle Ages you might
      have gone 3 lifetimes before you found out that a group of Parisians had
      solved some problem if you lived in southern France.

      > Stradivarious didn't have the internet. (Ok, he was a genius. A
      > giant standing on the shoulders of giants, but still...)

      You're talking about one person figuring something out, and not even a little
      bit about information decimination. If you don't see the difference then the
      point of this discussion is completely lost. Lots of VERY bright ideas never
      see the light of day because of who had them...even today. In a social
      millieu where one town might talk to another town once a year, the
      probability of that becomes very high. It could well be that the first guy
      to ever do a dovetail realized that reducing the angle ratio helped keep
      those corners from breaking off but he died before the next festival.

      --
      Cheers --- Larry Marshall
      Quebec City, QC
    • Beth and Bob Matney
      I am interested in locating some details (including images) as to the construction of the St. Paulinus (died 358AD) Trèves (transferred 395AD) coffin joined
      Message 46 of 46 , Jun 17, 2009
        I am interested in locating some details
        (including images) as to the construction of the
        St. Paulinus (died 358AD) Trèves (transferred
        395AD) coffin "joined by means of dovetailing".
        As the wood is described as 'cedar', there is
        some question as to where the coffin was made.

        From page 219,
        Battiscombe, C. F. The Relics of Saint Cuthbert; Studies by Various
        Authors. Oxford: Printed for the Dean and Chapter of Durham Cathedral
        at the University Press, 1956. OCLC 4071903
        http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/4071903

        footnotes 10/11 refer to detailed accounts of the
        coffin in Bonner Jahrbücher vol. lxxvii, 1884,
        pp. 238 ff; vol. lxxviii, 1884 pp. 173

        Rheinisches Landesmuseum in Bonn, and Rhine
        Province (Germany). Bonner Jahrbücher. 1842.
        ISSN:0067-9976 OCLC Number: 3459165 or OCLC
        Number: 213803943 microfilm, OCLC Number: 297237884 eJournal

        If anyone has seen the coffin or the journal
        articles referenced above (or preferably a more
        recent analysis in English), please post the
        information. It would be most appreciated,

        Thank you.
        Beth Matney
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