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Suggested wood for Kubb?

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  • Chas
    So one of teh ladies in my local shire had lived in Sweden for a while and brought back a really neat lawn game called Kubb (pronounced K-uh-b, with the oo
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
      So one of teh ladies in my local shire had lived in Sweden for a
      while and brought back a really neat lawn game called Kubb
      (pronounced K-uh-b, with the "oo" as in wood). They play some pretty
      fierce games at Pennsic and we've had some interesting matches here
      at home too. So I borrowed her set and redrew it. I'm ready to
      purchase wood now BUT Her set seems to be a soft Pine (cheap set) and
      doing a quick search I find that there are sets from all sorts of
      materials. It seems however the traditional wood is a hard
      lightweight pine if that makes sense? This game consists of 10 pieces
      split 5 and 5 on each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
      piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons that are
      thrown underhand to rotate at least once in teh air before hitting a
      piece. There are 6 strikers too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by
      6 inches with the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
      about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated the corners
      of the field. With the Batons and the king and the Kubbs being tossed
      and knocked about a bit they need to be a somewhat durable wood. I'm
      thinking of making 4 sets and maybe more so not only does the wood
      need to be durable but also cheap! LOL! Same old story right?

      Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

      V.L.
    • gunwaldt
      ... I built my first Kubb set from recycled oak and the second from fir. The hardest part was finding decent material from which to turn the batons. I ve not
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
        > Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

        I built my first Kubb set from recycled oak and the second from
        fir. The hardest part was finding decent material from which to
        turn the batons. I've not seen any serious wear on either set.
        After all, its just wood hitting wood. I've used softer woods for
        the king since it doesn't get hit much at all and I wanted to carve
        some designs to personalize them.

        > This game consists of 10 pieces split 5 and 5 on
        > each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
        > piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons
        > that are thrown underhand to rotate at least once in
        > teh air before hitting a piece. There are 6 strikers
        > too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by 6 inches with
        > the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
        > about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated
        > the corners of the field.

        I built the men out of 2x4s glued together and trimmed down to
        square. The first king started out as a pine 4x4. The second I
        laminated 3 pieces of mystery wood (recycled) and had a fun time
        carving across the joints. The third started out as a block of fir
        scrap from a wood yard. I've used thin broom handles for the
        stakes. Truthfully, I've spent more on the wood for the carrying
        boxes than on the game pieces. I wanted some 1x8 material to make a
        clean and compact case.

        Gunwaldt
      • Jon Whittom
        If you are looking for a cheap camp set... I made my set using (1) pine 2x2 for the batons and (1) landscape timber for the men/king. less than $10 for the
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
          If you are looking for a cheap 'camp' set...
          I made my set using (1) pine 2x2 for the batons and (1) landscape timber for the men/king.
          less than $10 for the materials.
           
          I hit the edges of the 2x2 with a router to make them less 'plain'.
          The pine 2x2 is real soft and they have some dings in them but it's a camp set.
           
          -John Widcombe
           
          On 9/5/07, gunwaldt <gunwaldt@...> wrote:

          > Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

          I built my first Kubb set from recycled oak and the second from
          fir. The hardest part was finding decent material from which to
          turn the batons. I've not seen any serious wear on either set.
          After all, its just wood hitting wood. I've used softer woods for
          the king since it doesn't get hit much at all and I wanted to carve
          some designs to personalize them.

          > This game consists of 10 pieces split 5 and 5 on
          > each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
          > piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons
          > that are thrown underhand to rotate at least once in
          > teh air before hitting a piece. There are 6 strikers
          > too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by 6 inches with
          > the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
          > about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated
          > the corners of the field.

          I built the men out of 2x4s glued together and trimmed down to
          square. The first king started out as a pine 4x4. The second I
          laminated 3 pieces of mystery wood (recycled) and had a fun time
          carving across the joints. The third started out as a block of fir
          scrap from a wood yard. I've used thin broom handles for the
          stakes. Truthfully, I've spent more on the wood for the carrying
          boxes than on the game pieces. I wanted some 1x8 material to make a
          clean and compact case.

          Gunwaldt


        • Tracy Swanson
          A hard, but lightweight wood would be yellow pine. Used primarily in construction (or it used to be), it has many of the familiar qualities of white pine, but
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
            A hard, but lightweight wood would be yellow pine. Used primarily in construction (or it used to be), it has many of the familiar qualities of white pine, but when driving nails or screws, is so hard that it requires pre-drilling. My first house was clad on the inside with lath and plaster. Some vagrants had spent time in the place, setting a fire on the bathroom floor (why they didn't use the tub...?). The fire department had torn large holes in the walls and I ( had decided to rewire and replumb the place as well, requiring the removal of the lath, replacing it with sheetrock. It became quite the chore, not only to remove all of the lath nails, but to drive the screws for the drywall as well.
             
            Yellow pine is a bit heavier than it's white cousin, and not quite as hard as oak - more like ash. Be sure that your tools are very sharp when turning.
             
            In Magical Service,
            Malaki
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Chas
            Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2007 7:16 AM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Suggested wood for Kubb?

            So one of teh ladies in my local shire had lived in Sweden for a
            while and brought back a really neat lawn game called Kubb
            (pronounced K-uh-b, with the "oo" as in wood). They play some pretty
            fierce games at Pennsic and we've had some interesting matches here
            at home too. So I borrowed her set and redrew it. I'm ready to
            purchase wood now BUT Her set seems to be a soft Pine (cheap set) and
            doing a quick search I find that there are sets from all sorts of
            materials. It seems however the traditional wood is a hard
            lightweight pine if that makes sense? This game consists of 10 pieces
            split 5 and 5 on each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
            piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons that are
            thrown underhand to rotate at least once in teh air before hitting a
            piece. There are 6 strikers too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by
            6 inches with the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
            about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated the corners
            of the field. With the Batons and the king and the Kubbs being tossed
            and knocked about a bit they need to be a somewhat durable wood. I'm
            thinking of making 4 sets and maybe more so not only does the wood
            need to be durable but also cheap! LOL! Same old story right?

            Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

            V.L.

          • Rebekah d'Avignon
            Yellow pine is generally found in the two by part of the lumber yard/box store. Ripping it is easy, especially with a table saw. Two-by-fours are the
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
              Yellow pine is generally found in the "two by" part of the lumber yard/box store. Ripping it is easy, especially with a table saw. Two-by-fours are the cheapest source, but ripping them into "2 x 2s" generates a bit of leftover waste. Perhaps those extra pieces could be utilized in another project.
               
              The infamous "X chair" (which is essentially 1 x 2s in "Xs" with a seat) is much more easily and cheaply made using ripped 2 x 4s because of the cost of the smaller wood and the frustration of trying to find unwarped ones. With the ripped wood they can be made "just a bit thicker for sturdiness (like a 250+ lb fighter in armor) and yellow pine is construction grade. The thinner pieces left over can be for the tops of the arms or the bottom of the legs. Better than using them as "oversized paint stirrers". Just a thought.

              Tracy Swanson <tstar2000@...> wrote:
              A hard, but lightweight wood would be yellow pine. Used primarily in construction (or it used to be), it has many of the familiar qualities of white pine, but when driving nails or screws, is so hard that it requires pre-drilling. My first house was clad on the inside with lath and plaster. Some vagrants had spent time in the place, setting a fire on the bathroom floor (why they didn't use the tub...?). The fire department had torn large holes in the walls and I ( had decided to rewire and replumb the place as well, requiring the removal of the lath, replacing it with sheetrock. It became quite the chore, not only to remove all of the lath nails, but to drive the screws for the drywall as well.
               
              Yellow pine is a bit heavier than it's white cousin, and not quite as hard as oak - more like ash. Be sure that your tools are very sharp when turning.
               
              In Magical Service,
              Malaki
              .




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            • Chris Larsson (Hrelgar)
              I just use standard 4x4s ripped down to the right sizes for king and kubbs. For batons I cut up some rattan. Rattan is pretty tough stuff and seems to work
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
                I just use standard 4x4s ripped down to the right sizes for king and
                kubbs. For batons I cut up some rattan. Rattan is pretty tough stuff
                and seems to work fine. I only play once in a while and it didn't
                matter to me if the pieces get dinged up a bit.

                Chris
              • leaking pen
                fir, or my fave, ponderosa pine, are both lightweight and decently durable. ... -- That which yields isn t always weak.
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 5, 2007
                  fir, or my fave, ponderosa pine, are both lightweight and decently durable.

                  On 9/5/07, Chas <wchasr@...> wrote:

                  So one of teh ladies in my local shire had lived in Sweden for a
                  while and brought back a really neat lawn game called Kubb
                  (pronounced K-uh-b, with the "oo" as in wood). They play some pretty
                  fierce games at Pennsic and we've had some interesting matches here
                  at home too. So I borrowed her set and redrew it. I'm ready to
                  purchase wood now BUT Her set seems to be a soft Pine (cheap set) and
                  doing a quick search I find that there are sets from all sorts of
                  materials. It seems however the traditional wood is a hard
                  lightweight pine if that makes sense? This game consists of 10 pieces
                  split 5 and 5 on each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
                  piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons that are
                  thrown underhand to rotate at least once in teh air before hitting a
                  piece. There are 6 strikers too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by
                  6 inches with the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
                  about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated the corners
                  of the field. With the Batons and the king and the Kubbs being tossed
                  and knocked about a bit they need to be a somewhat durable wood. I'm
                  thinking of making 4 sets and maybe more so not only does the wood
                  need to be durable but also cheap! LOL! Same old story right?

                  Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

                  V.L.




                  --
                  That which yields isn't always weak.
                • Jon Whittom
                  Found this on makezine.com this morning.... http://dyers.org/blog/archives/2007/09/10/make-your-own-kubb-set-for-dirt-cheap/
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 12, 2007
                    Found this on makezine.com this morning....
                     
                     
                    -John
                     
                    On 9/5/07, leaking pen <itsatrap@...> wrote:

                    fir, or my fave, ponderosa pine, are both lightweight and decently durable.

                    On 9/5/07, Chas <wchasr@...> wrote:

                    So one of teh ladies in my local shire had lived in Sweden for a
                    while and brought back a really neat lawn game called Kubb
                    (pronounced K-uh-b, with the "oo" as in wood). They play some pretty
                    fierce games at Pennsic and we've had some interesting matches here
                    at home too. So I borrowed her set and redrew it. I'm ready to
                    purchase wood now BUT Her set seems to be a soft Pine (cheap set) and
                    doing a quick search I find that there are sets from all sorts of
                    materials. It seems however the traditional wood is a hard
                    lightweight pine if that makes sense? This game consists of 10 pieces
                    split 5 and 5 on each side of a 4 meter by 8 metere field with a King
                    piece in the center. Adding in the strikers or batons that are
                    thrown underhand to rotate at least once in teh air before hitting a
                    piece. There are 6 strikers too. The men are roughly 2 1/2 x 2 1/2 by
                    6 inches with the king about 3 x 3 x 12. The batons are 1 1/2 dia by
                    about 12 inches long and there are 4 stakes to delineated the corners
                    of the field. With the Batons and the king and the Kubbs being tossed
                    and knocked about a bit they need to be a somewhat durable wood. I'm
                    thinking of making 4 sets and maybe more so not only does the wood
                    need to be durable but also cheap! LOL! Same old story right?

                    Anyhow that's tne question of the day!

                    V.L.




                    --
                    That which yields isn't always weak.


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