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Re: [MedievalSawdust] "Crusader" chest?

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  • WR
    At the (subtle) suggestion of Beth and Colin, I ve looked at the hinges again - maybe it s just my eyes, but they re not exactly what I d call well shown .
    Message 1 of 34 , Aug 13, 2007
      At the (subtle) suggestion of Beth and Colin, I've looked at the hinges
      again - maybe it's just my eyes, but they're not exactly what I'd call
      "well shown". However...

      Having said that, I used a graphics program to "play around" with the
      pictures - ironically, it was after I *reduced* the images that they
      became obvious! I think. Obvious enough that I can probably devise a
      reasonable working facsimile.

      One of the things that threw me was the metal strap. I was thinking
      that it was a later repair to a "blown out" hinge (wear or wood
      shrinkage causing the hole to enlarge). Then I noticed the same setup
      on the other hinge - is it possible that the whole thing was assembled,
      then a hole bored and the pin inserted? That'd certainly be one way to
      do it, possibly the easiest.

      Thanks for the gentle "Denozo smack!"
      Wolf

      AlbionWood wrote:
      > I think we may have discussed this chest before. Johnston gives it a
      > date of 1200-1220, so maybe somebody confused 1200 with 12th century...
      > If there was a Crusader connection, most likely it was to collect monies
      > for a Crusade (after the Interdict was lifted). The pin-hinges are
      > indeed well shown in the photos.
      >
      > Interesting little story in Johnston's book - at his suggestion, the
      > vicar looked for and found a secret compartment below a false bottom in
      > the money-till. In the gap between the false bottom and the front panel
      > there was a coin, which proved to be a silver half-penny of Edward I,
      > minted at Waterford Ireland. Johnston includes drawings of salient
      > features of the chest, including the till, false bottom, and secret
      > chamber, on p. 40.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Colin
      >
      >
      > Beth and Bob Matney wrote:
      >> You did look at the next few images from that
      >> link didn't you? LH hinge (#7 & 8 of 20) & (RH
      >> Hinge (#9 of 20) They weren't
      >> bad. http://tinyurl.com/2hk3p3 click on the next button.
    • WR
      At the (subtle) suggestion of Beth and Colin, I ve looked at the hinges again - maybe it s just my eyes, but they re not exactly what I d call well shown .
      Message 34 of 34 , Aug 13, 2007
        At the (subtle) suggestion of Beth and Colin, I've looked at the hinges
        again - maybe it's just my eyes, but they're not exactly what I'd call
        "well shown". However...

        Having said that, I used a graphics program to "play around" with the
        pictures - ironically, it was after I *reduced* the images that they
        became obvious! I think. Obvious enough that I can probably devise a
        reasonable working facsimile.

        One of the things that threw me was the metal strap. I was thinking
        that it was a later repair to a "blown out" hinge (wear or wood
        shrinkage causing the hole to enlarge). Then I noticed the same setup
        on the other hinge - is it possible that the whole thing was assembled,
        then a hole bored and the pin inserted? That'd certainly be one way to
        do it, possibly the easiest.

        Thanks for the gentle "Denozo smack!"
        Wolf

        AlbionWood wrote:
        > I think we may have discussed this chest before. Johnston gives it a
        > date of 1200-1220, so maybe somebody confused 1200 with 12th century...
        > If there was a Crusader connection, most likely it was to collect monies
        > for a Crusade (after the Interdict was lifted). The pin-hinges are
        > indeed well shown in the photos.
        >
        > Interesting little story in Johnston's book - at his suggestion, the
        > vicar looked for and found a secret compartment below a false bottom in
        > the money-till. In the gap between the false bottom and the front panel
        > there was a coin, which proved to be a silver half-penny of Edward I,
        > minted at Waterford Ireland. Johnston includes drawings of salient
        > features of the chest, including the till, false bottom, and secret
        > chamber, on p. 40.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Colin
        >
        >
        > Beth and Bob Matney wrote:
        >> You did look at the next few images from that
        >> link didn't you? LH hinge (#7 & 8 of 20) & (RH
        >> Hinge (#9 of 20) They weren't
        >> bad. http://tinyurl.com/2hk3p3 click on the next button.
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