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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Boxwood?

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  • Tracy Swanson
    The Latin name for Boxwood and Basswood re different, so theoretically they are of differing genome. I think that this is the case of if it looks, smells,
    Message 1 of 32 , Aug 2, 2007
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       The Latin name for Boxwood and Basswood re different, so theoretically they are of differing genome. I think that this is the case of "if it looks, smells, feels and works like boxwood, then it must be...". Quite often, throughout history, wood was chosen more on its appearance than its genome. Examples in the British and the Victoria and Albert museums are full of examples of pieces of differing woods that were glued up and then carved. It is only with the eye of an expert, and the differing patina after considerable age that the difference can be seen.
       
      In Magical Service,
      Malaki
       
       
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of leaking pen
      Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2007 10:22 AM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Boxwood?

      I could have sworn there was a post here a couple months ago where someone pointed out that boxwood was actually the same tree as some other rather common hardwood.  But heck if i can remember which tree.

       
      .

    • leaking pen
      as i recall, the man was vehemant against voltaire directly, discussing his sex life in frank detail, ect. i cant find a link i had read about it a while ago,
      Message 32 of 32 , Aug 9, 2007
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        as i recall, the man was vehemant against voltaire directly, discussing his sex life in frank detail, ect.  i cant find a link i had read about it a while ago, but heres some info about the missatrubition.
         
        On 8/9/07, JBRMM266@... <JBRMM266@...> wrote:

        Interesting . . . I've seen that line, pretty much as I gave it, cited in any number of sources. 

        I stand corrected.
         
        I can see how it is a generalized rendition of the sentiment conveyed in the letter.  One has to wonder, though, if he detested the Abbé's writing because he disagreed with it or because he just thought it was bad writing!

        Your servant aye
        Donal


        -----Original Message-----
        From: leaking pen <itsatrap@...>
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 3:31 pm
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] PC (was Re: Dogwood folk tale?)

        heh.  actually, that line was a line stated in a novel written about voltaire.  the closest thing he ever said known to that was a letter written to another writer,  "Monsieur l'abbé, I detest what you write, but I would give my life to make it possible for you to continue to write.''
         
        sorry, it was my sig line for a couple years.

         
        On 8/9/07, JBRMM266@... < JBRMM266@...> wrote:

        Wolf wrote:.
        
        <Contradictory, I know.  :-)  Welcome to "my" world!>
        
        Voltaire famously said, "I disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."



        --
        That which yields isn't always weak.

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