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Re: [MedievalSawdust] period woodworking demo kit

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  • Rebekah d'Avignon
    There s a lot of it depends in your question. Some Ren Faires allow almost anything while others have rather tight restrictions. One that I m somewhat
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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      There's a lot of "it depends" in your question. Some Ren Faires allow almost anything while others have rather tight restrictions. One that I'm somewhat familiar with has certain provisos that restrict the clothing (must be linen or wool, no rayon, cotton, spandex, etc), no watches or cell phones (glasses are ok), tools can have no plastc, rubber, etc. In light of this I'll just throw out some general ideas for demos in general.
       
      Demos are a lot like the State Fair (regardless of the state) - people aren't going to stand around for a long time looking at the same person....they get antsy. They probably aren't going to be at the event until you finish your project or they will forget to come back or decide not to in order to see the finished project. It's similar to the tv shows: New Yankee Workshop or The WoodWright's Shop. Have a project in various stages of completion. If you were to show how to build a bucket (or pail) no one is going to watch you shave a dozen or so slats for the sides so you have a bunch all ready and show how you make one. Then you show how they fit inside the form rings, fit the bottom on, and replace the form rings with permanent ones. You'll have to keep it to about 10 to 15 minutes and then they can ask questions or move on. With a chest you might want to have a finished chest, two pieces that are dovetailed (if that's your joinery) to show how they connect, and a couple of pieces that have pins and tails in the process of being cut.
       
      You have asked this after the start of Pennsic (eastern War) and will probably get more answers after the 12th.


      Derek Olson <beorn@...> wrote:
      hail and well met to all, I am new to this group and I am happy to be here, I hope to learn from of you and maybe be able to help some.
      Here's my first question.
      My reenactment group travels to several fests and fairs in a year and sets up encampment, Recently at a fair I stood and watched a blacksmith do some work and interact with the crowd, explaining techniques and what not and I thought why shouldn't I be able to do the same thing with my woodworking. ...I already lean towards hand tools in my "modern" hobby woodshop, and it would provide a great opportunity to interact with the public and educate on several levels if I were to be able to set up a bench, break the tools out of my mastermyr chest and spend the weekend building a chest or a rope bed or whatever.
      What I want to know is if any of you wonderful people do this now? And
      if so what you would suggest for needs in this venture. A type of "knock down" workbench perhaps, or nessesary tools? Any tips or suggestions would be wonderful.
      FYI the persona I work from is Viking circa 1000 AD
      Thank you in advance
      Beorn The Oldwolf
      .




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    • Paul A. Griffith
      Check out Master Findlaech s webpage at: http://www.bloodandsawdust.com/index.html it is a highly inspirational and in addition to some great photos of demos
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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        Check out Master Findlaech's webpage at:

        http://www.bloodandsawdust.com/index.html

        it is a highly inspirational and in addition to some great photos of
        demos being done, it shows the plans for a shaving horse (absolute must
        for preparing stock in a camp environment), portable lathes and the
        like.

        Enjoy,

        Baron Ansel (Atlantia, SCA)
      • AlbionWood
        Hi all (or at least those who aren t sweating away at Pennsic), I m finally getting some hands-on experience with green woodworking methods, in a workshop
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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          Hi all (or at least those who aren't sweating away at Pennsic),

          I'm finally getting some hands-on experience with green woodworking
          methods, in a workshop being led by Dan Stalzer, who studied under John
          Alexander and Drew Langsner. He's a great teacher, very fun guy, and
          the classmates are a good bunch as well (we don't seem to have that
          "high maintenance" type that usually mar such classes). Learning some
          good stuff; this is a very different way of working wood that anything
          I've done before. Now I gotta make me a shaving horse!

          We're making all the parts for a chair, then we'll be assembling our own
          from parts made by the previous workshop (since the parts have to dry
          for about 2 months). At the end of the week all 12 of us should have a
          completed chair.

          Next time Dan does one of these, I'll try to remember to post the
          information here in case anyone is interested in coming out to beautiful
          Mendocino for a week.

          Wish the tanoaks on my property were a little larger. You Easterners
          don't know how good you have it, surrounded by all that hardwood.

          Cheers,
          Colin
        • C N Schwartz
          I took the Alexander class years ago. How does all those wet oak shavings smell? You fall in love with that smell. ... From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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            I took the Alexander class years ago. 
             
            How does all those wet oak shavings smell?  You fall in love with that smell.
             
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of AlbionWood
            Sent: Wednesday, August 01, 2007 10:12 AM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Green wood workshop

            Hi all (or at least those who aren't sweating away at Pennsic),

            I'm finally getting some hands-on experience with green woodworking
            methods, in a workshop being led by Dan Stalzer, who studied under John
            Alexander and Drew Langsner. He's a great teacher, very fun guy, and
            the classmates are a good bunch as well (we don't seem to have that
            "high maintenance" type that usually mar such classes). Learning some
            good stuff; this is a very different way of working wood that anything
            I've done before. Now I gotta make me a shaving horse!

            We're making all the parts for a chair, then we'll be assembling our own
            from parts made by the previous workshop (since the parts have to dry
            for about 2 months). At the end of the week all 12 of us should have a
            completed chair.

            Next time Dan does one of these, I'll try to remember to post the
            information here in case anyone is interested in coming out to beautiful
            Mendocino for a week.

            Wish the tanoaks on my property were a little larger. You Easterners
            don't know how good you have it, surrounded by all that hardwood.

            Cheers,
            Colin

          • Elizabeth Brakhage
            Colin, You are so lucky. :-) I love working with green wood. I have my shave horse done, but haven t used it much. We have discovered that harder woods work
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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              Colin,

              You are so lucky. :-)  I love working with green wood.  I have my shave horse done, but haven't used it much.  We have discovered that harder woods work better for the table that clamps down on the piece you are working as a soft wood starts getting dents (?, not sure what the right word to use here is :-)) as you work with stuff.  So my laurel made us tables of yellow and purple heart so that they will hold up to the wear and tear.

              Please let me know when another workshop is.  I would love to try and attend. :-D

              Sara Sophia

              AlbionWood <albionwood@...> wrote:
              Hi all (or at least those who aren't sweating away at Pennsic),

              I'm finally getting some hands-on experience with green woodworking
              methods, in a workshop being led by Dan Stalzer, who studied under John
              Alexander and Drew Langsner. He's a great teacher, very fun guy, and
              the classmates are a good bunch as well (we don't seem to have that
              "high maintenance" type that usually mar such classes). Learning some
              good stuff; this is a very different way of working wood that anything
              I've done before. Now I gotta make me a shaving horse!

              We're making all the parts for a chair, then we'll be assembling our own
              from parts made by the previous workshop (since the parts have to dry
              for about 2 months). At the end of the week all 12 of us should have a
              completed chair.

              Next time Dan does one of these, I'll try to remember to post the
              information here in case anyone is interested in coming out to beautiful
              Mendocino for a week.

              Wish the tanoaks on my property were a little larger. You Easterners
              don't know how good you have it, surrounded by all that hardwood.

              Cheers,
              Colin




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            • Michael T Combs
              A springpole lathe can be made to be portable and you can turn out (no pun intended) some small items for people to take with them such as spindles. Derek
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 1, 2007
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                A springpole lathe can be made to be portable and you can turn out (no pun intended) some small items for people to take with them such as spindles.

                Derek Olson <beorn@...> wrote:
                hail and well met to all, I am new to this group and I am happy to be
                here, I hope to learn from of you and maybe be able to help some.
                Here's my first question.
                My reenactment group travels to several fests and fairs in a year and
                sets up encampment, Recently at a fair I stood and watched a blacksmith
                do some work and interact with the crowd, explaining techniques and
                what not and I thought why shouldn't I be able to do the same thing
                with my woodworking....I already lean towards hand tools in my "modern"
                hobby woodshop, and it would provide a great opportunity to interact
                with the public and educate on several levels if I were to be able to
                set up a bench, break the tools out of my mastermyr chest and spend the
                weekend building a chest or a rope bed or whatever.
                What I want to know is if any of you wonderful people do this now? And
                if so what you would suggest for needs in this venture. A type
                of "knock down" workbench perhaps, or nessesary tools? Any tips or
                suggestions would be wonderful.
                FYI the persona I work from is Viking circa 1000 AD
                Thank you in advance
                Beorn The Oldwolf



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