Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MedievalSawdust] engineering the slats for a bed

Expand Messages
  • Rebekah d'Avignon
    Wow......IMHO you are adding a lot of mass to your transport considerations - not only weight, but space as well. Several years ago I built the bed that I have
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 18, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Wow......IMHO you are adding a lot of mass to your transport considerations - not only weight, but space as well. Several years ago I built the bed that I have (not period, not easily transportable) for a twin mattress. I used 19/32 (approx 3/8") plywood and have found it very sturdy. The average (twin) bed has 3 or 4 slats from 1 x 3 (on the flat). A full or larger bed may have up to 5 slats. But there are much easier ways to ensure spacing and prevent "fall-through". Most of the support will be from the middle to the head of the bed (unless you tend to sit at the foot) because of weight distribution. After finishing your frame, space your slats to accommodate the weight distribution and glue "spacing blocks" on the rails to hold the first and last slats apart. Aside: this is much easier seen than explained. Example: inside the framework you have slat, 1 x 2 x 2 (approx) spacing block, then 2 or 3 or 4 slats, spacing block, last slat. With none of the slats held in place this would support a commercial mattress (but not a futon-style mattress). Have a staple gun handy and either cover the slats with cotton duck or get "lawn chair reweaving" kits (the rolls of plastic stuff for repairing lawn chairs). Staple the material across the last slat and pull it snug (not too tight) and staple to the first slat (hence the need for the spacing blocks). Go through and staple the material to each slat....5, 6, 10, 12.....however many staples you like. That way, you can pull the slats out as one piece and roll them up - no lost slats, spacing ensured. At Simple Day you can look at the Baronial Trash Bag Holders as that's how I did them (same theory, different application).
       
      As an aside: The rolling top of a roll-top desk is made from slats glued to a cloth backing and fitted into dadoes to slide. They can be bought at Rockler (which is where I stole this whole idea in the first place).

      Joseph Paul <josephnjody@...> wrote:
      I am designing the Pennsic bed now and I would like to ask for some input on
      the engineering of the slats.

      I am looking at 5 slats overlain with a 1/2" of plywood so that the futon
      mattress doesn't fall through. I need to cover 54".

      My previous efforts used 3 slats of 1x6 fir on edge. This whole flat slat
      thing makes me nervous as I think that 1 by material on the flat will break.

      How thick do you all make your slats and out of what?

      I suspect that I will end up pocketing the slats so they can't move and I
      might even dovetail them to prevent spreading.

      Jamie Blackrose




      On TV commercials: If I had a giant talking woodchuck in my kitchen eating pizza with a fork, I wouldn't be able to sleep either.


      Never miss an email again!
      Yahoo! Toolbar
      alerts you the instant new Mail arrives. Check it out.

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.