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Before you rent U-Haul to go to Pennsic!!!!!

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  • Lisa Wiser
    O)r for any reason1 U-Haul has had a bad reputation for years for equipment maintenance. Recently, the LA Times has done an extensive investigative report
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
      O)r for any reason1

      U-Haul has had a bad reputation for years for equipment maintenance. Recently, the LA Times has done an extensive investigative report about U-Haul. (A friend of mine just came back from renting a U-Haul truck to help move her son and daughter-in-law -- I didn't know she was going to be doing this, or I would have warned her about U-Haul -- they had to use a tool to whack the starter and leave the vehicle running until they stopped for the night -- they had been told, after it was loaded, after it had been "repaired" it had been fixed).

      DANGER IN TOW
      Driving with rented risks
      U-Haul International is the nation's largest provider of rental trailers. A Times investigation finds the company's practices raise the risk of accidents on the road.
      By Alan C. Miller and Myron Levin, Times Staff Writers
      June 24, 2007

      Marissa Sternberg sits in her wheelchair, barely able to move or speak. Caregivers are always at her side. Progress is measured in tiny steps: an unclenched fist, a look of recognition, a smile for her father. Nearly four years ago, Sternberg was a high-spirited 19-year-old bound for veterinary school in Denver. She rented a U-Haul trailer to move her belongings, hitched it to her Toyota Land Cruiser and hit the road with her two dogs and a friend. That evening, as the Land Cruiser descended a hill in the Chihuahuan Desert of New Mexico, the trailer began to swing from side to side, pushing the SUV as if trying to muscle it off the road.

      "I knew something bad was going to happen," recalled Corina Maya Hollander, who was taking a turn behind the wheel. "We both knew." The Land Cruiser flipped and bounced along Interstate 25. The trailer broke free and careened off the road. Hollander crawled from the wreckage, her head throbbing. Sternberg, who had been thrown from the SUV, lay sprawled on the highway, unable to move. "Where are my dogs?" she screamed. "Somebody go find my dogs!"

      Sternberg fell victim to a peril long familiar to U-Haul International: "trailer sway," a leading cause of severe towing accidents. Traveling downhill or shaken by a sharp turn or a gust of wind, a trailer can begin swinging so violently that only the most experienced — or fortunate — drivers can regain control and avoid catastrophe. U-Haul, the nation's largest provider of rental trailers, says it is "highly conservative" about safety. But a yearlong Times investigation, which included more than 200 interviews and a review of thousands of pages of court records, police reports, consumer complaints and other documents, found that company practices have heightened the risk of towing accidents.

      The safest way to tow is with a vehicle that weighs much more than the trailer. A leading trailer expert and U-Haul consultant has likened this principle to "motherhood and apple pie." Yet U-Haul allows customers to pull trailers as heavy as or heavier than their own vehicles. It often allows trailers to stay on the road for months without a thorough safety inspection, in violation of its own policies. Bad brakes have been a recurring problem with its large trailers. The one Sternberg rented lacked working brakes. Its midsize trailers have no brakes at all, a policy that conflicts with the laws of at least 14 states. It relaxed a key safety rule as it pushed to increase rentals of one type of trailer, used to haul vehicles, and then failed to enforce even the weakened standard. Customers were killed or maimed in ensuing crashes that might have been avoided...

      http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/uhaul/la-na-haul24jun24,1,4860340.story?coll=la-default-underdog&ctrack=3&cset=true



      If you can't read the link without a userid / password, you can use    http://www.bugmenot.com/    to get userid / password


      Lia

    • Tracy Swanson
      One also needs some proper information on how to tow a trailer, information that is often overlooked when it comes to a corporation renting to a customer.
      Message 2 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
        One also needs some proper information on how to tow a trailer, information that is often overlooked when it comes to a corporation renting to a customer.
         
        ALWAYS break primarily with the trailer's breaks (if the trailer comes so equipped). Think of when you played with toy trains. With the line of cars traveling fast, it is always best to apply drag (breaks) from the rear, slowing the train without incident by pulling on the cars in front. If, on the other hand, you apply drag from the front, the trailing vehicles will try to overrun the leading vehicle. In the case of an 18-wheeler, this is called a jackknife. It is potentially quite as devastating to a small vehicle as it is to a tractor-trailer.
         
        Other tips for hauling:
        Make sure that your removable hitch (if one is being used) is firmly pinned into place.
        Make sure to have at least one safety chain attached, in case the tow ball comes loose or unhitched.
        Check the tire pressure on both vehicle and trailer.
        Get a visual confirmation that the trailer lights really work.
        USE your trailer lights (signal, PLEASE!).
         
        High speed driving is a fun, but potentially hazardous activity, doubly dangerous when hauling a trailer. More than once have I seen the results of a moments' non-vigilance at the wheel. It is never pretty. Please be careful, and don't become a statistic.
         
        In Magical Service,
        Malaki
      • Helen Schultz
        Good hints, Malaki. Another thing to remember when using a trailer... be sure it is loaded correctly. Too much heavy weight in the front or back is bad... it
        Message 3 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
          Good hints, Malaki.
           
          Another thing to remember when using a trailer... be sure it is loaded correctly.  Too much heavy weight in the front or back is bad... it must be evenly distributed, and the heaviest weight over the wheels, if possible.  When pulling with automatic transmission, don't use Drive or Cruise Control (I know, hard on the right leg for long journeys), and drive it in 3rd gear (my van has a 3 in a square)... this was highly recommended to me by my Dodge dealer's Service staff.
           
          I've really noticed the difference if I loaded my 5' x 10' cargo trailer incorrectly, as it jerks and pulls funny.  Only experience will help in this case, I guess.  I pull with a 1996 Dodge Grand Caravan.  I have since made arrangements to leave that trailer at Pennsic, and have purchased a slightly smaller one to pull what I can't leave behind there (5' x 8').
           
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL
          Shire of Narrental (Peru, Indiana)  http://narrental.home.comcast.net
          Middle Kingdom
          http://meisterin.katarina.home.comcast.net
           
          "A room without books is like a body without a soul." -- Cicero
           
          "The danger in life is not that we aim too high and miss.
          The problem is that we aim too low and hit the mark."  -- Michaelangelo
           
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
           
          ----- Original Message -----

          Snipped...
           
          Other tips for hauling:
          Make sure that your removable hitch (if one is being used) is firmly pinned into place.
          Make sure to have at least one safety chain attached, in case the tow ball comes loose or unhitched.
          Check the tire pressure on both vehicle and trailer.
          Get a visual confirmation that the trailer lights really work.
          USE your trailer lights (signal, PLEASE!).
           
          Snipped...
           
          In Magical Service,
          Malaki

        • Lisa Wiser
          What many don t know, if the trailer has electric brakes, you need an brake controller in your vehicle. If you are only going to tow once, you might think this
          Message 4 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
            What many don't know, if the trailer has electric brakes, you need an
            brake controller in your vehicle.
            If you are only going to tow once, you might think this is an unneeded
            expense ... until you end up rolling several times because of that
            trailer. To buy and have installed my brake controller was about $125
            ... YMMV ... but no matter it's cheaper than a totalled vehicle,
            hospital bills, and possibly facing serious injury or death.

            TOWING is not something you just DO. You need some practice, someone who
            has done it before, some training. And, always remember: STARTING IS
            OPTIONAL. STOPPING IS NOT!!!

            Never use a small vehicle to tow a trailer. You'd be better off find the
            extra money to rent a van, pick up, or something, if your vehicle is too
            small to haul your stuff to Pennsic (or other long venues). Rental
            companies like Hertz and Avis may be slightly more than other companies,
            but the mileage is usually free, versus the guy that charges $0.35/mile.
            Of course, trucks tend to all charge a mileage charge ... it's still
            worth it over killing yourself (and / or someone else) hauling a trailer
            when you don't know what you are doing.

            Lia

            Tracy Swanson wrote:
            >
            > One also needs some proper information on how to tow a trailer,
            > information that is often overlooked when it comes to a corporation
            > renting to a customer.
            >
            > ALWAYS break primarily with the trailer's breaks (if the trailer comes
            > so equipped). Think of when you played with toy trains. With the line
            > of cars traveling fast, it is always best to apply drag (breaks) from
            > the rear, slowing the train without incident by pulling on the cars in
            > front. If, on the other hand, you apply drag from the front, the
            > trailing vehicles will try to overrun the leading vehicle. In the case
            > of an 18-wheeler, this is called a jackknife. It is potentially quite
            > as devastating to a small vehicle as it is to a tractor-trailer.
            >
            > Other tips for hauling:
            > Make sure that your removable hitch (if one is being used) is firmly
            > pinned into place.
            > Make sure to have at least one safety chain attached, in case the tow
            > ball comes loose or unhitched.
            > Check the tire pressure on both vehicle and trailer.
            > Get a visual confirmation that the trailer lights really work.
            > USE your trailer lights (signal, PLEASE!).
            >
            > High speed driving is a fun, but potentially hazardous activity,
            > doubly dangerous when hauling a trailer. More than once have I seen
            > the results of a moments' non-vigilance at the wheel. It is never
            > pretty. Please be careful, and don't become a statistic.
            >
          • Lisa Wiser
            General rule of thumb is to load 60% in the front half, the rest distrubuted throught the back. One way to be sure is to load the front half, take the trailer
            Message 5 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
              General rule of thumb is to load 60% in the front half, the rest
              distrubuted throught the back. One way to be sure is to load the front
              half, take the trailer to a weigh station, load the remainder of your
              stuff, and reweigh. Adjust as needed. So you don't have to remember just
              what you did or have to reweigh when repacking to come home ... you can
              used masking or duct tape on the floor of the vehicle to mark your load
              and then draw an inventory.

              Also, remember when your tow vehicle has a weight limit THAT INCLUDES
              WHATEVER YOU HAVE LOADED IN THE VEHICLE. You cannot discount that!! So,
              you cannot take a PU truck that can tow 3000 lbs, put 2500lbs in the
              trialer and 1000 lbs in the bed ... you've now exceeded the limit.

              Along with not using your cruise control, don't use overdrive!!! This
              can ruin your tow vehicle, especially pulling through hills (and it
              doesn't take much).

              Lia

              Helen Schultz wrote:
              >
              > Good hints, Malaki.
              >
              > Another thing to remember when using a trailer... be sure it is loaded
              > correctly. Too much heavy weight in the front or back is *bad*... it
              > must be evenly distributed, and the heaviest weight over the wheels,
              > if possible. When pulling with automatic transmission, don't use
              > Drive or Cruise Control (I know, hard on the right leg for long
              > journeys), and drive it in 3rd gear (my van has a 3 in a square)...
              > this was highly recommended to me by my Dodge dealer's Service staff.
              >
              > I've really noticed the difference if I loaded my 5' x 10' cargo
              > trailer incorrectly, as it jerks and pulls funny. Only experience
              > will help in this case, I guess. I pull with a 1996 Dodge Grand
              > Caravan. I have since made arrangements to leave that trailer at
              > Pennsic, and have purchased a slightly smaller one to pull what I
              > can't leave behind there (5' x 8').
              >
            • Rebekah d'Avignon
              The only thing to add to that is: those who pull a trailer frequently might want to watch the movie Black Dog to see what NOT to do with a trailer on
              Message 6 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                The only thing to add to that is: those who pull a trailer frequently might want to watch the movie Black Dog to see what NOT to do with a trailer on hills.....the wreck is pretty spectacular.

                Tracy Swanson <tstar2000@...> wrote:
                One also needs some proper information on how to tow a trailer, information that is often overlooked when it comes to a corporation renting to a customer.
                 
                ALWAYS break primarily with the trailer's breaks (if the trailer comes so equipped). Think of when you played with toy trains. With the line of cars traveling fast, it is always best to apply drag (breaks) from the rear, slowing the train without incident by pulling on the cars in front. If, on the other hand, you apply drag from the front, the trailing vehicles will try to overrun the leading vehicle. In the case of an 18-wheeler, this is called a jackknife. It is potentially quite as devastating to a small vehicle as it is to a tractor-trailer.
                 
                Other tips for hauling:
                Make sure that your removable hitch (if one is being used) is firmly pinned into place.
                Make sure to have at least one safety chain attached, in case the tow ball comes loose or unhitched.
                Check the tire pressure on both vehicle and trailer.
                Get a visual confirmation that the trailer lights really work.
                USE your trailer lights (signal, PLEASE!).
                 
                High speed driving is a fun, but potentially hazardous activity, doubly dangerous when hauling a trailer. More than once have I seen the results of a moments' non-vigilance at the wheel. It is never pretty. Please be careful, and don't become a statistic.
                 
                In Magical Service,
                Malaki



                The surest way to avoid failure is to never attempt anything new or anything that you can't do perfectly - but it's a rather dull life and you'd never learn anything new.


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              • Trevor Payne
                Lisa Wiser wrote: General rule of thumb is to load 60% in the front half, the rest distrubuted throught the back. ME: 60/40
                Message 7 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                  Lisa Wiser <lawiser@...> wrote:
                  General rule of thumb is to load 60% in the front half, the rest
                  distrubuted throught the back.

                  ME:

                  60/40 ratio is a good rule of thumb.  Basically you WANT more weight on the tongue than over the axles.  But MORE IS NOT BETTER!!!  Stay at 60% infront of the axle and 40% behind the axles.  Why?  Because MOST trailer hitches use a clamp down hitch.  Basically there is a little shallow "U" shapped foot that clamps onto the trailer ball.  Now, this clamp is designed to pivot and even stop the hitch from coming dis-engaged (IE, popping off the ball) during transport.  BUT, if you load the back of your trailer so that the hitch is pulling UP on the ball the whole way, there is a greater chance of it failing.  So, making sure that there is a greater percentage of weight over the tongue will prevent that.


                  Also, remember when your tow vehicle has a weight limit THAT INCLUDES
                  WHATEVER YOU HAVE LOADED IN THE VEHICLE. You cannot discount that!! So,
                  you cannot take a PU truck that can tow 3000 lbs, put 2500lbs in the
                  trialer and 1000 lbs in the bed ... you've now exceeded the limit.

                  ME:

                  Another thing to remember is the LOAD RATING of your TRAILER.  If your trailer has a load rating of 3,000 pounds. DON'T PUT 5,000 pounds in it!  

                  The load rating is determined by 2 major items:

                  1. the load rating of the tires on the trailer
                  2. the load rating of the axle.

                  if you over load your trailer you run the risk of blowing a tire AND/OR breaking an axle.  Either one can cause a HUGE wreck.

                  Also, remember if your trailer has a load rating of 3,000 pounds, but the trailer wieghs 1,000 pounds, YOU ONLY HAVE 2,000pnds of load left!  NOT, 3,000 pnds PLUS the trailer weight.

                  Aiden



                  "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
                  --Benjamin Franklin--


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                • Keith Dombrowski
                  Just to keep things clear regarding the original post, U-Haul trailers do not have electric brakes. Their trailers (the ones that have brakes) use hydraulic
                  Message 8 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                    Just to keep things clear regarding the original post, U-Haul trailers do not have electric brakes. Their trailers (the ones that have brakes) use hydraulic surge brakes, a style of brakes where the pressure of the trailer pushing forward on the hitch when you brake the tow vehicle activates the trailer brakes.

                    That said, I'd still never use a u-haul trailer for highway towing. In order to make them sturdy enough to handle the abuse of renting, they are heavily over-engineered and tend to weight about twice as much as they should when empty. That's before the maintenance or lack thereof, comes into play.

                    I pull a 6x12, with electric brakes and all the appropriate equipment with a truck that weighs twice what the trailer does (loaded). I own it all and I inspect and maintain it myself, despite the state inspections it is subject to.

                    I realize that many people either don't have the funds or the space to keep a trailer of their own, but if you've got that much stuff, find someone in your group who does and arrange to have some of your stuff hauled. Cook them dinner for the event or something, just don't overload your own vehicle, directly or with a badly designed trailer. I haul stuff to and from Pennsic for my shire mates every year, because I have the ability to do it safely. I'd far rather spend a bit more in gas than end up scraping a friend off the road because they tried to tow with a small vehicle or an overweight trailer (or even worse, one of those eggshells called a mini-van).

                    -Kean

                    BTW: If you absolutely MUST rent a u-haul trainer, try and do it from an actual U-Haul Store center, not Joe's Garage and Bait Shop down on the corner. Even if you have to drive a bit to get to one, you're a little more likely to get one that's been serviced.


                    >From: Lisa Wiser <lawiser@...>
                    >What many don't know, if the trailer has electric brakes, you need an
                    >brake controller in your vehicle.
                    >If you are only going to tow once, you might think this is an unneeded
                    >expense ... until you end up rolling several times because of that
                    >trailer. To buy and have installed my brake controller was about $125
                    >... YMMV ... but no matter it's cheaper than a totalled vehicle,
                    >hospital bills, and possibly facing serious injury or death.
                    >
                  • Stuart Tingle
                    Here in Canada Uhaul are under investigation after a number of deaths related to their lack of maintenance on their trucks. Last I heard on the news they had
                    Message 9 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                      Here in Canada Uhaul are under investigation after a number of deaths
                      related to their lack of maintenance on their trucks. Last I heard on
                      the news they had 30 days to get their act together or would be banned
                      from operation and their licenses not honoured in Ontario, other
                      provinces would follow after this.
                    • WR
                      Just to add another .02, for what it s worth (last time I checked, about .0075): ... For the record, while I heartily agree with this sentiment for the most
                      Message 10 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                        Just to add another .02, for what it's worth (last time I checked, about
                        .0075):

                        Keith Dombrowski wrote:
                        >
                        > BTW: If you absolutely MUST rent a u-haul trainer, try and do it from an actual U-Haul Store center, not Joe's Garage and Bait Shop down on the corner. Even if you have to drive a bit to get to one, you're a little more likely to get one that's been serviced.
                        >
                        >

                        For the record, while I heartily agree with this sentiment "for the most
                        part", I've also known a few "Joe's Garage and Bait Shops" that I'd rent
                        from before going anywhere near an actual U-Haul center. I've found a
                        couple of trailers maintained to a level that exceeded a
                        "brand-spanking-new, right off the assembly line" trailer. Classic case
                        of YMMV, and one of those things you have to stumble across - if you're
                        going to put that much time into finding one of those rarities, it's
                        better (and faster) to make other arrangements.

                        While I've read a lot of good advice on towing, I think the most
                        important I've seen (speaking to the novice trailer-er here) is from
                        Lia: "TOWING is not something you just DO. You need some practice,
                        someone who has done it before, some training."

                        If you've never towed a trailer, or only towed one moving Chuck or Linda
                        from one apartment to another, don't assume that it's a matter of just
                        backing up, hooking up, and going! Distance-driving isn't the same as
                        going a few miles - you'll encounter a lot more situations that you'd
                        never encounter on city streets. Find someone who's been towing for a
                        while (and moving Chuck or Linda three times does NOT constitute "towing
                        for a while"!) - preferably someone who's towed a variety of trailers
                        from converted pick-up beds to large fifth-wheels, if at all possible.
                        Go somewhere SAFE, and practice, practice, practice. Empty trailer,
                        fully loaded trailer, half-loaded trailer - if you can, throw in
                        "mis-loaded trailer" and "over-loaded trailer". You'll quickly discover
                        that they don't handle the same way. And it's better to have an
                        incident in a large, empty parking lot than to have one on a crowded
                        Interstate.

                        As stated earlier, if overloading is an issue, find someone to split the
                        load, or seriously re-think what "has" to go.

                        (STUPIDITY ALERT!)
                        Years ago when I was ten feet tall and bullet-proof, I was helping with
                        the re-roofing of our house after a hail-storm (far southwestern
                        Oklahoma, so it was a BAD hail-storm!). My sturdy 1964 Ford 1/2 Ton had
                        extra leaf-springs, and heavy-duty coil springs around the rear shocks,
                        so 13 squares of shingles in the back shouldn't be a problem, right?
                        (can you say "already overloaded"?). NOT centered over the axle, NOT
                        forward of the axle. At the "know it all" age of 22 and only going
                        about 7 miles or so, I didn't think it'd be a problem - WRONG!

                        Even at 35 MPH that was the longest 7 miles I've ever driven. It felt
                        like the tailgate was dragging, and the front wheels were about to come
                        off the ground at any time.

                        Moral: don't exceed weight-limits, and load right - or don't load at all.

                        Wolf
                      • James Winkler
                        ... Actually... if ya got copper pennies the copper in em is worth more than one cent... and... ummm... come to think of it... I do believe that, given jump
                        Message 11 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                          >> Just to add another .02, for what it's worth (last time I checked,
                          about .0075): <<
                           
                          Winking smiley emoticon   Actually...  if ya' got copper pennies the copper in em' is worth more than one cent... and... ummm... come to think of it... I do believe that, given jump in metals prices, even the copper coated zinc ones are worth more than a penny...
                           
                          so...
                           
                          yer' two cents may quite well be worth a lot more than ya' think!   (Good post by the way...)
                           
                          ... and my 'tip for the tow'er"...  if ya' rent a trailer... always 'preflight' the thing.  Just like a pilot... do a walk around, check for anything broken, bent or not lookin' right.  Hook it up... visually check the lights and brakes...  and, if you don't know what this is about, take somebody who KNOWS trailers along when you go to pick one up to preflight it for you...   being out on the highway is a bad time to find out that one brake grabs more than another...  or to have a friendly constable point out that the left turn signal on the trailer isn't working... 
                           
                          ... just because you pick one up from a major rental place doesn't mean they've checked it over since they bought it.
                           
                           
                          Chas.
                           

                           
                        • James Winkler
                          .. oh... and ya might want to make double sure about the tires (and check the spare)... ain t nothing less happy than having a blow out on a fully loaded
                          Message 12 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                            ... oh... and ya' might want to make double sure about the tires (and check the spare)... ain't nothing less happy than having a blow out on a fully loaded trailer... at night... in the rain... with no spare (or a flat one...)...
                             
                            Chas.
                          • Lewis Newby
                            And even us experienced trailer hauling folks (over 50K miles on the current trailer) have incidents that could make a grown man cry (yes I did) such as having
                            Message 13 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                              And even us experienced trailer hauling folks (over 50K miles on the current trailer) have incidents that could make a grown man cry (yes I did) such as having the bearings in the wheel hub seize up and burn out only to crack the hub and cause the entire wheel assembly to come off. Always inspect the trailer at every stop, the 5 minutes you use could save a lot.

                              All the advice I have read today is great and should be listened to and if all else fails... ask more questions of experienced folks and the place where you rent your trailer from. You can never have to much information when it comes to those things.

                              Just as a note. I prefer to use the large steel snap link carabiners  on my safety chains so they don't bounce off while going down the road. I have twice had the basic hooks bounce off but was still safe because of the snap links.


                              Lewis Newby Jr.                                                                                     Email: dragon@...
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                              (///////[0]=============================================-       
                                       \\       At some time the dragon shall conquer                           MSN: wyvernstr@...
                                        \>                                                                                                     Blog: http://lewnewby.blogspot.com/


                              On Jul 2, 2007, at 4:13 PM, James Winkler wrote:


                              ... oh... and ya' might want to make double sure about the tires (and check the spare)... ain't nothing less happy than having a blow out on a fully loaded trailer... at night... in the rain... with no spare (or a flat one...)...
                               
                              Chas.


                            • Trevor Payne
                              Oh, absolutely inspect the trailer every time you stop. Also, touch the bearing caps on your trailer tires every time you get gas. If they are NOT cool to
                              Message 14 of 20 , Jul 2, 2007
                                Oh, absolutely inspect the trailer every time you stop.

                                Also, touch the bearing caps on your trailer tires every time you get gas.  If they are NOT cool to cold then you need to pack the more with grease.  You will need a grease gun (about $20 at an auto parts store) and know how to use it with a grease Zerc.


                                I like the carabiner snaps as well, for the same reason.  I also cross the chains under the tongue and then snap them to the truck.  That way if the hitch does come off, you have a better chance of the chains catching it before it slams into the pavement.

                                Aiden

                                Lewis Newby <dragon@...> wrote:
                                And even us experienced trailer hauling folks (over 50K miles on the current trailer) have incidents that could make a grown man cry (yes I did) such as having the bearings in the wheel hub seize up and burn out only to crack the hub and cause the entire wheel assembly to come off. Always inspect the trailer at every stop, the 5 minutes you use could save a lot.

                                All the advice I have read today is great and should be listened to and if all else fails... ask more questions of experienced folks and the place where you rent your trailer from. You can never have to much information when it comes to those things.

                                Just as a note. I prefer to use the large steel snap link carabiners   on my safety chains so they don't bounce off while going down the road. I have twice had the basic hooks bounce off but was still safe because of the snap links.






                                "Those who beat their swords into plowshares plow for those who didn't"
                                --Benjamin Franklin--


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                              • Gunther von Sachsenhausen
                                I had a U-Haul truck SELF DESTRUCT in Barstow, CA on my way to NM. I will never, ever rent from them again. Conversely, my experience with Budget has been much
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jul 3, 2007
                                  I had a U-Haul truck SELF DESTRUCT in Barstow, CA on my way to NM. I
                                  will never, ever rent from them again. Conversely, my experience with
                                  Budget has been much better.
                                • scott gates
                                  What I have found was it all depends on the rental agency. Some will ask you what you need, and provide you with something that does the job just right. Some
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jul 3, 2007
                                    What I have found was it all depends on the rental agency. Some will ask you what you need, and provide you with something that does the job just right. Some will just give you whatever makes them the most money, and who cares about the state of it. This applies to all the truck/trailer companies. When I was moving from DC to Michigan. I requested a 24 foot truck with AC as I was moving pets with me. Ryder gave me the largest truck in the fleet at that time. 32 feet. No AC, radio was broken. The stupid thing had 280K miles on it, and it showed.
                                    If you were making a severe turn you could watch power steering fluid shoot out the grill. The oil dipstick got stuck, and had to be hammed back down. Not quite the late model they were advertising. I was in the Army, and if I wanted a truck now, that was what I got. No matter that 8 weeks before I had reserved one.                        I was underweight for the rental pay from the service, and picked up some furniture my mother wanted moved to make the weight. These guys had the truck, but rented it out for a cash customer instead of myself. The army would take weeks to pay of course, so they gave me the the truck that would make them the most money, in the worst shape. I had rented U-hauls locally, and the guy keeps his trucks in good shape. He will ask all sorts of questions about what you are moving, and can your vehicle tow this trailer safely. Do you have experience with towing, or driving something big. He always takes care of me, and once even got me a truck on no notice, if I didn't mind waiting for them to do the oil/fluid changes and checks on it. Really in the end it comes down to people educating themselves on 2 things. The safe operation of a large trailer, and knowing who in the area cares about the customer.

                                    Evil is, as Evil does



                                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                    From: gunther_von_sachsenhausen@...
                                    Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2007 14:40:43 +0000
                                    Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Before you rent U-Haul to go to Pennsic!!!!!

                                    I had a U-Haul truck SELF DESTRUCT in Barstow, CA on my way to NM. I
                                    will never, ever rent from them again. Conversely, my experience with
                                    Budget has been much better.




                                    Don't get caught with egg on your face.    Play Chicktionary! 
                                  • Rob Lewis
                                    And make sure you have a decent jack, a tire iron, and a good light that are easy to get to. Ivan Kosinski College of Brymstonne Atenveldt MKA Rob Lewis From:
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jul 3, 2007

                                      And make sure you have a decent jack, a tire iron, and a good light that are easy to get to.

                                       

                                       

                                      Ivan Kosinski
                                      College of Brymstonne
                                      Atenveldt

                                      MKA Rob Lewis

                                       

                                       

                                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James Winkler
                                      Sent: Monday, July 02, 2007 1:13 PM
                                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Before you rent U-Haul to go to Pennsic!!!!!

                                       

                                      ... oh... and ya' might want to make double sure about the tires (and check the spare)... ain't nothing less happy than having a blow out on a fully loaded trailer... at night... in the rain... with no spare (or a flat one...)...

                                       

                                      Chas.

                                    • WR
                                      Hehehe, thanks for reminding me. ;-) A couple of years ago I bought a truck from a friend who was going to France for the summer. I recently decided to
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jul 3, 2007
                                        Hehehe, thanks for reminding me. ;-)

                                        A couple of years ago I bought a truck from a friend who was going to
                                        France for the summer. I recently decided to replace the shocks - the
                                        jack-stands I was expecting to buy, I "didn't" expect to buy a jack, a
                                        lug-wrench, and a 4' piece of half-inch stock to crank down the doughnut
                                        spare! (I decided to rotate the tires while I was at it)

                                        And promptly discovered that El Cheapo temporary spare was about two
                                        deep breaths short of flat.

                                        Moral: check **everything** at least twice!

                                        Wolf
                                        ("Older" does NOT necessarily equate to "wiser"!)

                                        Rob Lewis wrote:
                                        > And make sure you have a decent jack, a tire iron, and a good light that are
                                        > easy to get to.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Ivan Kosinski
                                        > College of Brymstonne
                                        > Atenveldt
                                        >
                                        > MKA Rob Lewis
                                      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                                        FYI most trailer bearings do NOT have grease Zercs and have to be taken out and packed with grease. Repack every year(unless you get a warm bearing on the
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jul 7, 2007
                                          FYI most trailer bearings do NOT have grease Zercs and have to be taken out
                                          and "packed" with grease. Repack every year(unless you get a warm bearing
                                          on the road) two years if it only goes to Pennsic. It is not a hard job
                                          only ....Greasy.... I do all my tractors, baler, wagons, rake, cars and
                                          trailers.

                                          James Cunningham
                                          farmer but not an expert on pulling trailers

                                          Oh, absolutely inspect the trailer every time you stop.

                                          Also, touch the bearing caps on your trailer tires every time you get gas.
                                          If they are NOT cool to cold then you need to pack the more with grease.
                                          You will need a grease gun (about $20 at an auto parts store) and know how
                                          to use it with a grease Zerc.


                                          Ito crack the hub and cause the entire wheel assembly to come off. Always
                                          inspect the trailer at every stop, the 5 minutes you use could save a lot.
                                        • John LaTorre
                                          On this thread (somewhat off-topic, I know, but people gotta haul their wood and stuff to Pennsic somehow), I might draw attention to an article I posted on my
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jul 8, 2007
                                            On this thread (somewhat off-topic, I know, but people gotta haul their
                                            wood and stuff to Pennsic somehow), I might draw attention to an article
                                            I posted on my web site many moons ago, which is still relevant:

                                            http://midtown.net/dragonwing/col0004.htm

                                            --Johann von Drachenfels
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