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Re: wood primer

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  • Jim Hart
    Let me be more specific..... I ve got most of a gallon of a flat latex ceiling paint that I bought CHEAP and then mixed a little black into to paint some
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1 3:17 AM
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      Let me be more specific..... I've got most of a gallon
      of a flat latex ceiling paint that I bought CHEAP and
      then mixed a little black into to paint some halloween
      decorations. It's now a nice light gray.

      Think I can use it? or should it stop taking up space in
      my shop start taking up space in the trash?

      I'm looking at priming a simple wooden chest that will
      be painted later by the guy that wants the chest.
    • Rebekah d'Avignon
      Once again, I may be wrong, but I read.......paints and stains are very similar in composition. A paint tends to sit on the surface while a stain tends to
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1 6:29 AM
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        Once again, I may be wrong, but I read.......paints and stains are very similar in composition. A paint tends to "sit on the surface" while a stain tends to soak into the wood. Another difference is that paints tend to be opaque and stains are not. There is a large amount of crossover between these and they are not "hard and fast" rules. Milk paint, for instance, tends to be absorbed and cheap paint (like apartments use) tend to not be opaque. A primer coat is intended to bond to the surface and give paint a gripping place. Older buildings or those with cheap exterior paint will peel completely down to the wood when moisture breaks the bond between paint and wood. Additionally primer is intended to, as seen on tv, give you a consistent color and surface to work with when painting to avoid shading differences in case of dirt, surface oils, etc.
         
        Aude Aliquid Dignum......add a liquid to your diet? (Sorry, couldn't resist).

        Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart <baronconal@...> wrote:
        not knowing a lot about what makes a primer...primer. ...

        Can any not glossy paint be used as a primer coat on wood?
         
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '
        .




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      • Joseph Paul
        In general when talking about primer and paint, primer s job is to stick to the material and paint s job is to stick to primer. Why risk paint peeling later?
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 1 6:37 AM
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          In general when talking about primer and paint, primer's job is to stick to the material and paint's job is to stick to primer. Why risk paint peeling later?
           
          Jamie Blackrose
          -----Original Message-----
          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          Sent: Saturday, June 30, 2007 9:33 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] wood primer

          not knowing a lot about what makes a primer...primer. ...

          Can any not glossy paint be used as a primer coat on wood?


           
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '



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        • Tracy Swanson
          Ceiling latex does well to stick to the ceiling. The latex is the binder to the paint, and the more glossy it is, the more latex is present. If you have ever
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 1 8:29 AM
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            Ceiling latex does well to stick to the ceiling. The latex is the binder to the paint, and the more glossy it is, the more latex is present. If you have ever dealt with painting a ceiling you will have noticed that oftentimes the old paint is rather chalky and will, if rubbed, leave a trace (sometimes more than a trace) on your hand afterwards. This is indicative of a paint which will not make a good primer. I have used latex as a primer, sometimes with good results, but only when using at least a satin level paint, and then not for outdoor use. Milk paint uses the natural enzymes in the milk as a binder (from what I understand). It is basically a step and a half above a whitewash in outdoor durability (it runs and washes away - a half step above whitewash would be casine, which is used as a fast-drying paint in the theater, but has virtually no binder).
             
            KILZ is, by far, the best paint primer I have ever used, and you can get it tented to virtually any color, but don't expect it to exactly match the latex or other paint that you intend to put on top of it. The tinting machines used are programmed to work from the white base used by a particular brand of paint. They have not yet programmed the machines to deal with the ultra-white used by KILZ. I just finished an outdoor wooden-framed window screen to replace the original one that had rotted while hanging on its Victorian house. I gave it back to the owner with two coats of KILZ on it as a primer, confident that it will protect the wood, even if they don't get the house repainted for a couple of years (it has been about 30 since the last paint job...).
             
            Hope this helps.
             
            In Magical Service,
            Malaki
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Jim Hart
            Sent: Sunday, July 01, 2007 5:18 AM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: wood primer

            Let me be more specific.... . I've got most of a gallon
            of a flat latex ceiling paint that I bought CHEAP and
            then mixed a little black into to paint some halloween
            decorations. It's now a nice light gray.

            Think I can use it? or should it stop taking up space in
            my shop start taking up space in the trash?

            I'm looking at priming a simple wooden chest that will
            be painted later by the guy that wants the chest.

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