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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Draw knives - What should a rookie use?

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  • C N Schwartz
    Yes, a Buck Bros. 6 is my favorite, though Pexto or PS&W are also good. 8 is a more common width. Sadly, catalogs haven t offered these in over 50 years. To
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 16, 2007
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      Yes, a Buck Bros. 6" is my favorite, though Pexto or PS&W are also good.  8" is a more common width.
       
      Sadly, catalogs haven't offered these in over 50 years. 
       
      To get something similar try Tony Murland http://www.antiquetools.co.uk/tools.htm or Pat Leach http://www.supertool.com/forsale/307sale.htm  or Tony Seo http://www.oldetoolshop.com/  and many others for your antique tools needs.  I have used all three and many others and have gotten good deals from all. 
       
      A little hesitant to go the antique tool route and prefer something new?  Fine, I can understand that.  I haven't used a modern commercial drawknife but have only used one.  The one I bought is no longer available I believe.  It is hard for me to recommend, but Lee Valley has been a good source for me:
       
       
      I prefer this handle shape
       
      to this
       
       
      Type A is nice looking
       
      I'd never consider the straight handle, like type B.
       
       
       
      I keep hoping the prototype drawknife from Lie Nielsen I tried will go into production, but not yet.  It was perfect.
       
       
       
       
      -----Original Message-----
       
       
      OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
      else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
      draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
      gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
      purchase. Any recommendations on companies?

      What would be a good Eastern European/slavic/ germanic hardwood
      comparable to koa? Any guesses?

      This is a great group. Lots of fun, beautiful workmanship, and nice
      people. Thank you for that.

      Mahalo and aloha.
      AberHardt Wendlander
      Barony of the Western Seas

       
    • Johann Friedrich
      I m happy with the one I have that used to belong to my grand father, but every once in a while I ll go looking to see what s out there. In addition to Lee
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 16, 2007
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        I'm happy with the one I have that used to belong to my grand father, but
        every once in a while I'll go looking to see what's out there. In
        addition to Lee Valley, take a look at Traditional Woodworker. They tend
        to be a little more expensive than Lee Valley, but they also seem to have
        a larger selection when it comes to traditional woodworking tools.

        http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/default.php/cPath/36_104

        I havn't ordered from them (yet), but I swear I hear my bank account
        scream every time I look at their catalog.

        On Fri, 16 Mar 2007, C N Schwartz wrote:

        > Yes, a Buck Bros. 6" is my favorite, though Pexto or PS&W are also good. 8"
        > is a more common width.
        >
        > Sadly, catalogs haven't offered these in over 50 years.
        >
        > To get something similar try Tony Murland
        > http://www.antiquetools.co.uk/tools.htm or Pat Leach
        > http://www.supertool.com/forsale/307sale.htm or Tony Seo
        > http://www.oldetoolshop.com/ and many others for your antique tools needs.
        > I have used all three and many others and have gotten good deals from all.
        >
        > A little hesitant to go the antique tool route and prefer something new?
        > Fine, I can understand that. I haven't used a modern commercial drawknife
        > but have only used one. The one I bought is no longer available I believe.
        > It is hard for me to recommend, but Lee Valley has been a good source for
        > me:
        >
        >
        > I prefer this handle shape
        > http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=20115&cat=1,41131,41140
        >
        > to this
        > http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=44502&cat=1,130,43332
        >
        >
        > Type A is nice looking
        > http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=252
        >
        > I'd never consider the straight handle, like type B.
        >
        >
        >
        > I keep hoping the prototype drawknife from Lie Nielsen I tried will go into
        > production, but not yet. It was perfect.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        >
        >
        > OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
        > else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
        > draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
        > gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
        > purchase. Any recommendations on companies?
        >
        > What would be a good Eastern European/slavic/germanic hardwood
        > comparable to koa? Any guesses?
        >
        > This is a great group. Lots of fun, beautiful workmanship, and nice
        > people. Thank you for that.
        >
        > Mahalo and aloha.
        > AberHardt Wendlander
        > Barony of the Western Seas
        >
        >

        -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=[The Realm of Darkness]=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= O-
        Ken Bowley yahoo@...
        AKA: Herr Johann Friedrich http://www.trod.org
        -=-=-=-=[Per saltire sable and gules, in fess two rapiers Or]=-=-=-=-
      • Ralph Lindberg
        ... There is a Woodcraft in Honolulu, Woodcraft carries a Sorby that should be good. http://www.woodcraft.com/search/search.aspx?query=draw+knife TTFN Ralg
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 16, 2007
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "abestripe" <abestripe@...> wrote:
          >
          > OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
          > else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
          > draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
          > gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
          > purchase. Any recommendations on companies?
          >
          There is a Woodcraft in Honolulu, Woodcraft carries a Sorby that
          should be good.
          http://www.woodcraft.com/search/search.aspx?query=draw+knife

          TTFN
          Ralg
          AnTir
        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          www.leevalley.com go there and look around. PLENTY to spend your money on Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something Worthy ...
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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            www.leevalley.com

            go there and look around.

            PLENTY to spend your money on
             
            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

            Aude Aliquid Dignum
            ' Dare Something Worthy '


            ----- Original Message ----
            From: abestripe <abestripe@...>
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, March 16, 2007 3:55:33 PM
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Draw knives - What should a rookie use?

            OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
            else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
            draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
            gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
            purchase. Any recommendations on companies?

            What would be a good Eastern European/slavic/ germanic hardwood
            comparable to koa? Any guesses?

            This is a great group. Lots of fun, beautiful workmanship, and nice
            people. Thank you for that.

            Mahalo and aloha.
            AberHardt Wendlander
            Barony of the Western Seas




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          • Rebekah d'Avignon
            FWIW - I m one of those people who believes that you can t run any faster or make any more baskets with a pair of $200 tennis shoes than you can with a pair of
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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              FWIW - I'm one of those people who believes that you can't run any faster or make any more baskets with a pair of $200 tennis shoes than you can with a pair of $20 tennis shoes. Skill plays a big part in the game and it's the same with woodworking. I've seen draw knives at both Rockler and WoodCraft - they are not cheap, but should definitely be under $100.

              abestripe <abestripe@...> wrote:
              OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
              else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
              draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
              gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
              purchase. Any recommendations on companies?

              What would be a good Eastern European/slavic/ germanic hardwood
              comparable to koa? Any guesses?

              This is a great group. Lots of fun, beautiful workmanship, and nice
              people. Thank you for that.

              Mahalo and aloha.
              AberHardt Wendlander
              Barony of the Western Seas
              .




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            • Dawn Perez
              ... faster or make any more baskets with a pair of $200 tennis shoes than you can with a pair of $20 tennis shoes. Skill plays a big part in the game and it s
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Rebekah d'Avignon
                <rebekahdavignon@...> wrote:
                >
                > FWIW - I'm one of those people who believes that you can't run any
                faster or make any more baskets with a pair of $200 tennis shoes than
                you can with a pair of $20 tennis shoes. Skill plays a big part in the
                game and it's the same with woodworking. I've seen draw knives at both
                Rockler and WoodCraft - they are not cheap, but should definitely be
                under $100.
                >

                As a former Woodcraft employee, I can attest that they are not cheap,
                but most of the ones we carried were from Lee Valley, or that Swedish
                company that now the name eludes me. So, if you have a woodcraft
                nearby, check them out. Lots of hand tools that you just don't find
                in any ole hardware store, and chisels of every size and shape (if you
                are into carving!).

                Albina the wood sprite
              • Heath Barlin
                As a former Woodcraft employee, I can attest that they are not cheap, but most of the ones we carried were from Lee Valley, or that Swedish company that now
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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                  As a former Woodcraft employee, I can attest that they are not cheap,
                  but most of the ones we carried were from Lee Valley , or that Swedish
                  company that now the name eludes me.

                   


                  Granfor Bruks?

                   

                  H

                • Ralph Lindberg
                  ... Ya know, I ve been getting their catalog on and off for years, but never been to a store. Last January I had some spare hours in the Vancouver BC area. So
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                    <baronconal@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > www.leevalley.com
                    >
                    Ya know, I've been getting their catalog on and off for years, but
                    never been to a store. Last January I had some spare hours in the
                    Vancouver BC area. So I went tool shopping, I went to Grizzly, KMS
                    Tools, Island Turning, House of Tools and Lee Valley.
                    I gotta tell ya the only place that disappointed me was Lee Valley.
                    It was a show room, down to oak and glass display cases, that in one
                    case only held one jointing plane.
                    KMS, now that was a tool store. Tools, everywhere!!!

                    TTFN
                    Ralg
                    AnTir
                  • C N Schwartz
                    Pfeil? It s a 2-Cherries one made in Germany I didn t like. The blade was just rectilinear in cross section and the handles tended toward Continental style
                    Message 9 of 11 , Mar 17, 2007
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                      Pfeil?
                       
                      It's a 2-Cherries one made in Germany I didn't like.  The blade was just rectilinear in cross section and the handles tended toward Continental style (small and egg shaped, sorta.) vice a British/American style handles (long and narrow chisel handle shaped.)  But that is my personal preference.
                       
                       
                      Additionally...
                       
                      Good idea on going to the Woodcraft in Honolulu to look, even if you don't buy there.  Get your hands on one and hold it to see if it is comfortable to you.  If you ever find old tool dealers in one place that you meet in person, the thing to look for is, again, does it feel right in your hands?  Are the handles tight or do they twist around?  Does the tang go all the way through the handles and somehow screw or bend over or peen to the an end cap?  (I HATE it when a drawkife handle pops off.) 
                       
                      Safety:  You are pulling a sharp blade toward you, yet the things are relatively safe when you use them.  It's hard to bring the blade ALL the way up to your torso.  The big danger, I have found, with drawknives is when you reach for one or someone passes one to you or you try to catch one that drops off the bench.  When one hand goes toward grabbing a drawknife it is amazing how often you grab a piece of edge.  Keep that in mind
                       
                       
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Heath Barlin
                      Sent: Saturday, March 17, 2007 3:44 PM
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Draw knives - What should a rookie use?

                      As a former Woodcraft employee, I can attest that they are not cheap,
                      but most of the ones we carried were from Lee Valley , or that Swedish
                      company that now the name eludes me.


                      Granfor Bruks?

                      H

                    • Brian Wagner
                      I have several draw knives I have picked up cheap in flea markets and antique stores, and they re ok. But my favorite is a little jewel I ordered from Cape
                      Message 10 of 11 , Mar 19, 2007
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                        I have several draw knives I have picked up cheap in flea markets and antique stores, and they're ok.  But my favorite is a little jewel I ordered from Cape Forge.  The craftmanship is excellent, and it has a narrower blade than any other I have - making it great for concave curves, such as where the handle and bowl meet on a spoon.
                         
                        Hroþgar Fiscabana
                        Barony of Small Gray Bear
                        Gleann Abhann
                         
                        -----Original Message-----
                         
                         
                        OK, so I've been lurking and oogling and drooling over everybody
                        else's projects and the time has come. What would be a good first
                        draw knife for me to suggest my wife buy me as a "wood" anniversary
                        gift? I live in HAwaii, so it will probably have to be a mail order
                        purchase. Any recommendations on companies?

                        What would be a good Eastern European/slavic/ germanic hardwood
                        comparable to koa? Any guesses?

                        This is a great group. Lots of fun, beautiful workmanship, and nice
                        people. Thank you for that.

                        Mahalo and aloha.
                        AberHardt Wendlander
                        Barony of the Western Seas

                         
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