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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Another basic question

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  • Scott Lane
    ... A MAPP torch is kind of like a propane on steroids. You can get them at any hardware store right next to the propane. Scrounge in a bin for crate
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 28, 2003
      >Thanks, that's also great info! It and an earlier post leads me to a
      >follow-up question: What's a MAPP torch? Also, what sort of
      >supplier might I look for to find relativelyu small quantities of
      >steel strapping? I suppose if I think about it a bit, I could come
      >up with a retailer of largish items who would have lots of strapping
      >scraps lying around getting ready to be thrown out. I think perhaps
      >I'll try the local riding lawnmower retailers among others.

      A MAPP torch is kind of like a propane on steroids. You can get
      them at any hardware store right next to the propane.
      Scrounge in a bin for crate strapping, any largish industrial area
      should have plenty being thrown away...

      Aodhfin
    • Joseph Hayes
      ... As I recall, MAPP is a proprietary form a propylene gas (C3H6). It burns hotter that propane (C3H8), but not as hot as an oxy-propane mix. Ulrich ...
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 30, 2003
        --- vinlandar <vinlandar@...> wrote:
        > What's a MAPP torch?

        As I recall, MAPP is a proprietary form a propylene gas (C3H6). It
        burns hotter that propane (C3H8), but not as hot as an oxy-propane mix.

        Ulrich
        ... who's wife does glass beads and won't let him play with her
        torches...


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      • rmhowe
        Assuming you want to learn a bit about shields: The three sources in English on Anglo-Saxon Shields [and one should remember that the Vikings had a substantial
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 27, 2003
          Assuming you want to learn a bit about shields:

          The three sources in English on Anglo-Saxon Shields [and one
          should remember that the Vikings had a substantial amount of
          land area for the last two centuries or so of Saxon rule} are:

          THE ANGLO-SAXON SHIELD by I.P. Stephenson. Describes the
          construction, decoration, and use of these shields and their
          place in the art of warfare as practiced in Anglo-Saxon times.
          60 illustrations. 2002: 160 pages, softcover. (Tempus) 6XWK
          Price: $29.99 7/15/03 Scholars Bookshelf http://www.scholarsbookshelf.com/
          This also covers a lot of previous material. I've been reading
          it from time to time, and it is very good. Shields of other
          provenances from Roman to Valsgarde/Vendel (Sutton Hoo),
          to Picts are discussed. Many of them were faced with leather
          both sides. One is depicted with the overlaps tacked down in
          a series of overlapping arcs on the back.

          Dickinson, Tania, and Heinrick Harke: Early Anglo-Saxon Shields;
          Archaeologia, volume 110, 1992/3, Society of Antiquaries of
          London, Burlington House, Picadilly, London H1V 0HS,
          ISBN 0854312609, 94 pages, Hardback. Was selling in the mid
          twenties from Oxbowbooks.com or David Brown Book Company.

          Drummond, James: Highland Targets and Other Shields;
          70pp. pb. "Full color, heavy paper reprint of the 1873
          edition (which was issued in a limited run of just 50),
          with additional material by Drummond on shields. Many
          of you are familiar with Drummond's work on Ancient
          Scottish Weapons; this is an additional, little known
          work which concentrates upon the targets and other
          shields used in the Highlands, with illustrations and
          text on them. Such information always is difficult to
          locate, and this invaluable study shows numerous shields
          and their designs in great detail."
          SP-197. $24.95 plus shipping from
          http://www.scotpress.com/ 2/02
          Covers from Bronze Age metal to leather molded to
          mostly later period survivals. Very good book.

          Bruce-Mitford, Rupert: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial Vol. II.
          and
          Bruce-Mitford, R.L.S.: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial,
          The rich tomb of a seventh-century Anglo-Saxon king has
          yielded an archaeological treasure that illuminates an
          obscure period in the history of the English people;
          in Scientific American magazine, April 1951; Cover
          (in color of front of shield), pages 24-30 with 12 b&w
          photographs of the excavation in progress and the
          individual treasures.
          "the helmet, shield and sword very probably were from the
          Baltic coast of Sweden....at least no eveidence of it has
          been found anywhere except in Sweden and at Sutton Hoo."
          "it may well be that analysis of all the factors will ultimately
          establish that the royal house of East Anglia (the Wulffinges,
          as they were called) were of Swedish origin."

          Siddorn, J. Kim: Viking Weapons and Warfare; Tempus
          Publishing Ltd, The Mill, Brimscombe Port, Stroud, GL5 2QG.
          FP2000 UK, lSBN 0752414194, 160 pages, 88 line drawings,
          31 colour plates, in English. UK, £15.99 USA, $26.99

          And then you get into bosses:

          Evison, Vera: Sugar Loaf Shield Bosses, Antiquaries
          Journal 43, 1963; 59pp, 40figs, pp. 38-96 and 40
          figures - usually depicting multiple drawn objects,
          maps of provenance, 88 shield bosses of varying shapes,
          some shield struts, reconstruction of shield from Thetford,
          Norfolk; sword from Boar’s Lowe, Tissington, Derbyshire;
          shield grips, spear heads and a ferrule, pans similar to
          bosses, Bronze garnet inlaid pyramid, knife blades, two
          glass cups and a glass vessel, belt buckles, silver rims
          for the Alton coopered wooden drinking vessels,
          the Alton Buckle, iron clips, a purse mount, comb, bone
          strip holed at the ends, one shear blade, gold filigree
          open work brooch with garnets, pot, glass counters, seax
          (sax) pommel.

          Evison, V: Anglo-Saxon Finds near Rainham, Essex, with a
          Study of Glass Drinking-horns; Archaeologia 96, 1955.
          38pp, 12figs, 11b/w pls, pp. 159-98 and plates LIX-LXX,
          last plate is the Torrs Chamfrein which uses drinking
          horn ends as horns. A-S Square-headed brooch, glass whorls,
          girdle hanger, coopered bronze-bound drinking vessels,
          diagrams of pattern welded swords, shield bosses, pottery
          cups (4), spearheads, round mouthed pitchers, pots,
          gold pendant, 36 views of mostly different drinking horns.

          Magnus
        • Schuster, Robert L.
          damn you and your biblios Magnus now i have to head to the library again;) Halvgrimr keep um coming ol boy;) ... From: rmhowe [mailto:MMagnusM@bellsouth.net]
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 28, 2003
            damn you and your biblios Magnus
            now i have to head to the library again;)

            Halvgrimr
            keep um coming ol boy;)



            -----Original Message-----
            From: rmhowe [mailto:MMagnusM@...]
            Sent: Sunday, July 27, 2003 7:54 PM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Another basic question


            Assuming you want to learn a bit about shields:

            The three sources in English on Anglo-Saxon Shields [and one
            should remember that the Vikings had a substantial amount of
            land area for the last two centuries or so of Saxon rule} are:

            THE ANGLO-SAXON SHIELD by I.P. Stephenson. Describes the
            construction, decoration, and use of these shields and their
            place in the art of warfare as practiced in Anglo-Saxon times.
            60 illustrations. 2002: 160 pages, softcover. (Tempus) 6XWK
            Price: $29.99 7/15/03 Scholars Bookshelf http://www.scholarsbookshelf.com/
            This also covers a lot of previous material. I've been reading
            it from time to time, and it is very good. Shields of other
            provenances from Roman to Valsgarde/Vendel (Sutton Hoo),
            to Picts are discussed. Many of them were faced with leather
            both sides. One is depicted with the overlaps tacked down in
            a series of overlapping arcs on the back.

            Dickinson, Tania, and Heinrick Harke: Early Anglo-Saxon Shields;
            Archaeologia, volume 110, 1992/3, Society of Antiquaries of
            London, Burlington House, Picadilly, London H1V 0HS,
            ISBN 0854312609, 94 pages, Hardback. Was selling in the mid
            twenties from Oxbowbooks.com or David Brown Book Company.

            Drummond, James: Highland Targets and Other Shields;
            70pp. pb. "Full color, heavy paper reprint of the 1873
            edition (which was issued in a limited run of just 50),
            with additional material by Drummond on shields. Many
            of you are familiar with Drummond's work on Ancient
            Scottish Weapons; this is an additional, little known
            work which concentrates upon the targets and other
            shields used in the Highlands, with illustrations and
            text on them. Such information always is difficult to
            locate, and this invaluable study shows numerous shields
            and their designs in great detail."
            SP-197. $24.95 plus shipping from
            http://www.scotpress.com/ 2/02
            Covers from Bronze Age metal to leather molded to
            mostly later period survivals. Very good book.

            Bruce-Mitford, Rupert: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial Vol. II.
            and
            Bruce-Mitford, R.L.S.: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial,
            The rich tomb of a seventh-century Anglo-Saxon king has
            yielded an archaeological treasure that illuminates an
            obscure period in the history of the English people;
            in Scientific American magazine, April 1951; Cover
            (in color of front of shield), pages 24-30 with 12 b&w
            photographs of the excavation in progress and the
            individual treasures.
            "the helmet, shield and sword very probably were from the
            Baltic coast of Sweden....at least no eveidence of it has
            been found anywhere except in Sweden and at Sutton Hoo."
            "it may well be that analysis of all the factors will ultimately
            establish that the royal house of East Anglia (the Wulffinges,
            as they were called) were of Swedish origin."

            Siddorn, J. Kim: Viking Weapons and Warfare; Tempus
            Publishing Ltd, The Mill, Brimscombe Port, Stroud, GL5 2QG.
            FP2000 UK, lSBN 0752414194, 160 pages, 88 line drawings,
            31 colour plates, in English. UK, £15.99 USA, $26.99

            And then you get into bosses:

            Evison, Vera: Sugar Loaf Shield Bosses, Antiquaries
            Journal 43, 1963; 59pp, 40figs, pp. 38-96 and 40
            figures - usually depicting multiple drawn objects,
            maps of provenance, 88 shield bosses of varying shapes,
            some shield struts, reconstruction of shield from Thetford,
            Norfolk; sword from Boar’s Lowe, Tissington, Derbyshire;
            shield grips, spear heads and a ferrule, pans similar to
            bosses, Bronze garnet inlaid pyramid, knife blades, two
            glass cups and a glass vessel, belt buckles, silver rims
            for the Alton coopered wooden drinking vessels,
            the Alton Buckle, iron clips, a purse mount, comb, bone
            strip holed at the ends, one shear blade, gold filigree
            open work brooch with garnets, pot, glass counters, seax
            (sax) pommel.

            Evison, V: Anglo-Saxon Finds near Rainham, Essex, with a
            Study of Glass Drinking-horns; Archaeologia 96, 1955.
            38pp, 12figs, 11b/w pls, pp. 159-98 and plates LIX-LXX,
            last plate is the Torrs Chamfrein which uses drinking
            horn ends as horns. A-S Square-headed brooch, glass whorls,
            girdle hanger, coopered bronze-bound drinking vessels,
            diagrams of pattern welded swords, shield bosses, pottery
            cups (4), spearheads, round mouthed pitchers, pots,
            gold pendant, 36 views of mostly different drinking horns.

            Magnus





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