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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges

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  • Bill McNutt
    It s a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a scraper to dress some types of board edges. There s a good picture and description on
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007

      It’s a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a scraper to dress some types of board edges.  There’s a good picture and description on www.redsword.com/ dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll house mouldings are out-of-period.

       

      Master William

       


      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of leaking pen
      Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges

       

      aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?

      On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@wildblue .net> wrote:

      > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep the
      > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within reach at
      > all times.
      >
      > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with the same
      > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the face
      > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd take a
      > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
      >
      > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions that 14th
      > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as I would
      > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the difference by
      > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of some of
      > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those apprentices
      > must have done with scratch stocks.
      >
      > Colin
      >
      >
      > leaking pen wrote:
      > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my repetoire.
      > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt all done
      > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
      > > techniques with saws? im curious.
      > >
      > > Thanks.
      > > Alexander the so so
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      --
      That which yields isn't always weak.

    • leaking pen
      That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself one tonight. (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can make a lot of them
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007
        That is absolutely perfect.  thanks.  i think ill make myself one tonight.
         
        (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools.  i can make a lot of them myself. )

         
        On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:

        It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a scraper to dress some types of board edges.  There's a good picture and description on www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll house mouldings are out-of-period.

         

        Master William

         


        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of leaking pen
        Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges

         

        aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?

        On 1/10/07, AlbionWood < albionwood@...> wrote:
        > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep the
        > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within reach at
        > all times.
        >
        > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with the same
        > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the face
        > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd take a
        > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
        >
        > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions that 14th
        > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as I would
        > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the difference by
        > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of some of
        > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those apprentices
        > must have done with scratch stocks.
        >
        > Colin
        >
        >
        > leaking pen wrote:
        > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my repetoire.
        > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt all done
        > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
        > > techniques with saws? im curious.
        > >
        > > Thanks.
        > > Alexander the so so
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        --
        That which yields isn't always weak.




        --
        That which yields isn't always weak.
      • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
        I ve also seen them made so that they resemble a marking gauge which would give you a larger tool to grip while you are using it. I d consider wood instead of
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007
          I've also seen them made so that they resemble a marking gauge which would give you a larger
          tool to grip while you are using it. I'd consider wood instead of metal to hold the scraper blade of the tool.

          I've also seen a simple version that Roy Underhill made with a block of wood and a slotted screw
          The slot on the head of the screw was turned so that it was the cutting/scraping surface of the makeshift tool.


           
          Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

          Aude Aliquid Dignum
          ' Dare Something Worthy '


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: leaking pen <itsatrap@...>
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2007 2:41:25 PM
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges

          That is absolutely perfect.  thanks.  i think ill make myself one tonight.
           
          (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools.  i can make a lot of them myself. )

           
          On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@pobox. com> wrote:

          It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a scraper to dress some types of board edges.  There's a good picture and description on www.redsword. com/dollhouse/ moulding. htm, although the doll house mouldings are out-of-period.

           

          Master William

           


          From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of leaking pen
          Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges

           

          aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?

          On 1/10/07, AlbionWood < albionwood@wildblue .net> wrote:
          > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep the
          > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within reach at
          > all times.
          >
          > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with the same
          > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the face
          > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd take a
          > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
          >
          > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions that 14th
          > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as I would
          > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the difference by
          > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of some of
          > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those apprentices
          > must have done with scratch stocks.
          >
          > Colin
          >
          >
          > leaking pen wrote:
          > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my repetoire.
          > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt all done
          > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
          > > techniques with saws? im curious.
          > >
          > > Thanks.
          > > Alexander the so so
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          --
          That which yields isn't always weak.




          --
          That which yields isn't always weak.


          __________________________________________________
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        • windsingersmoon
          I ve been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the beginning thread........but if I
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007
            I've been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new
            house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the beginning
            thread........but if I understand what's being sought here....someone
            wants a way to neatly round off the square corners of lumber for a
            nice finished furniture look ????/

            There is a tool, specially made for this.
            it'll easily do the job )PERFECTLY in only one or two, easy passes.

            Looks kinda like a can-opener (about same size and shape, but at both
            ends.....i.e. same general width and thickness, with turned up ends
            and rounded corners.......but here's the working part. At the curve
            bend in each end, is a cut out oval hole with sharpened edges.
            The oval hole at one end, is a different size than at the other.

            You pull it, WITH grain of wood, along the corner. It neatly,
            perfectly, rounds the corners so beautifully you'll be flabbergasted
            at the simplicity and easiness of the whole process.

            Highland Hardware, in Atlanta, has them (it's where I got my own,
            years ago) They run (current price) 10.99 each....
            http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?
            PageAction=PRODSEARCH&txtSearch=corner%20&Page=2
            It's called a 'cornering tool'

            Happy woodworking
            Shara, who's getting my new Guildhall house wired by the end of this
            week, and after a couple of years, living in an 8 x 10 shed, am about
            to move into a heavenly abode of 2-stories, with an 18 x 40'
            bedroom/solar, upstairs, with 16.5 foot cathederal ceilings !!!!!!
            And twill become all a-decorated with tapestries, banners, wrought
            iron candle chandaliers, huge candle-sticks, and wonderful furniture,
            with an antique bed on a raised platform, and heavy drapes, around
            it.......We Should be moved in, by the end of the month !!!!! The
            Building inspector approving (it's being wired by his predecessor, so
            I KNOW it's being done right) and the electric company being co-
            operative in getting us hooked up....YYYYYYYYEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH!!!!
            OUT of this closet, and Into something we can insulate and heat !!!!
            And I'll have a wonderful large kitchen !!!! full of antique tools,
            (kitchen ones, the wood-working ones are all in my shop, nearby)
            S.


            --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself one
            tonight.
            >
            > (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can make a
            lot of
            > them myself. )
            >
            >
            > On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a
            scraper to
            > > dress some types of board edges. There's a good picture and
            description on
            > > *www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll house
            > > mouldings are out-of-period.*
            > >
            > > * *
            > >
            > > *Master William*
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------
            > >
            > > *From:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
            > > medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *leaking pen
            > > *Sent:* Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
            > > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            > > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?
            > >
            > > On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@...<albionwood%40wildblue.net>>
            > > wrote:
            > > > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep
            the
            > > > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within
            reach at
            > > > all times.
            > > >
            > > > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with
            the same
            > > > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the
            face
            > > > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd
            take a
            > > > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
            > > >
            > > > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions
            that 14th
            > > > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as
            I would
            > > > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the
            difference by
            > > > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of
            some of
            > > > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those
            apprentices
            > > > must have done with scratch stocks.
            > > >
            > > > Colin
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > leaking pen wrote:
            > > > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my
            repetoire.
            > > > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt
            all done
            > > > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
            > > > > techniques with saws? im curious.
            > > > >
            > > > > Thanks.
            > > > > Alexander the so so
            > > > >
            > > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > That which yields isn't always weak.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > That which yields isn't always weak.
            >
          • leaking pen
            Actually, the exact application is to round out the corners of spanking paddles , both 1 inch thick, and 1/2 to 1/4 inch thick, that are being cut out on a
            Message 5 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007
              Actually, the exact application is to round out the corners of
              spanking paddles , both 1 inch thick, and 1/2 to 1/4 inch thick, that
              are being cut out on a band saw from planks, so that there is a smooth
              curve off that wont cut into flesh when being used to spank people.

              (you asked)

              On 1/11/07, windsingersmoon <asa.wood@...> wrote:
              > I've been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new
              > house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the beginning
              > thread........but if I understand what's being sought here....someone
              > wants a way to neatly round off the square corners of lumber for a
              > nice finished furniture look ????/
              >
              > There is a tool, specially made for this.
              > it'll easily do the job )PERFECTLY in only one or two, easy passes.
              >
              > Looks kinda like a can-opener (about same size and shape, but at both
              > ends.....i.e. same general width and thickness, with turned up ends
              > and rounded corners.......but here's the working part. At the curve
              > bend in each end, is a cut out oval hole with sharpened edges.
              > The oval hole at one end, is a different size than at the other.
              >
              > You pull it, WITH grain of wood, along the corner. It neatly,
              > perfectly, rounds the corners so beautifully you'll be flabbergasted
              > at the simplicity and easiness of the whole process.
              >
              > Highland Hardware, in Atlanta, has them (it's where I got my own,
              > years ago) They run (current price) 10.99 each....
              > http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?
              > PageAction=PRODSEARCH&txtSearch=corner%20&Page=2
              > It's called a 'cornering tool'
              >
              > Happy woodworking
              > Shara, who's getting my new Guildhall house wired by the end of this
              > week, and after a couple of years, living in an 8 x 10 shed, am about
              > to move into a heavenly abode of 2-stories, with an 18 x 40'
              > bedroom/solar, upstairs, with 16.5 foot cathederal ceilings !!!!!!
              > And twill become all a-decorated with tapestries, banners, wrought
              > iron candle chandaliers, huge candle-sticks, and wonderful furniture,
              > with an antique bed on a raised platform, and heavy drapes, around
              > it.......We Should be moved in, by the end of the month !!!!! The
              > Building inspector approving (it's being wired by his predecessor, so
              > I KNOW it's being done right) and the electric company being co-
              > operative in getting us hooked up....YYYYYYYYEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH!!!!
              > OUT of this closet, and Into something we can insulate and heat !!!!
              > And I'll have a wonderful large kitchen !!!! full of antique tools,
              > (kitchen ones, the wood-working ones are all in my shop, nearby)
              > S.
              >
              >
              > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself one
              > tonight.
              > >
              > > (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can make a
              > lot of
              > > them myself. )
              > >
              > >
              > > On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a
              > scraper to
              > > > dress some types of board edges. There's a good picture and
              > description on
              > > > *www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll house
              > > > mouldings are out-of-period.*
              > > >
              > > > * *
              > > >
              > > > *Master William*
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------
              > > >
              > > > *From:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
              > > > medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *leaking pen
              > > > *Sent:* Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
              > > > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
              > > > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?
              > > >
              > > > On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@...<albionwood%40wildblue.net>>
              > > > wrote:
              > > > > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep
              > the
              > > > > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within
              > reach at
              > > > > all times.
              > > > >
              > > > > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with
              > the same
              > > > > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the
              > face
              > > > > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd
              > take a
              > > > > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
              > > > >
              > > > > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions
              > that 14th
              > > > > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as
              > I would
              > > > > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the
              > difference by
              > > > > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of
              > some of
              > > > > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those
              > apprentices
              > > > > must have done with scratch stocks.
              > > > >
              > > > > Colin
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > leaking pen wrote:
              > > > > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my
              > repetoire.
              > > > > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt
              > all done
              > > > > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
              > > > > > techniques with saws? im curious.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > Thanks.
              > > > > > Alexander the so so
              > > > > >
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --
              > > That which yields isn't always weak.
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >


              --
              That which yields isn't always weak.
            • leaking pen
              ohh, and, i like that, actually. i was doing the rounding of the corners themselves with a sander. that works. ... -- That which yields isn t always weak.
              Message 6 of 24 , Jan 11, 2007
                ohh, and, i like that, actually. i was doing the rounding of the
                corners themselves with a sander. that works.

                On 1/11/07, windsingersmoon <asa.wood@...> wrote:
                > I've been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new
                > house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the beginning
                > thread........but if I understand what's being sought here....someone
                > wants a way to neatly round off the square corners of lumber for a
                > nice finished furniture look ????/
                >
                > There is a tool, specially made for this.
                > it'll easily do the job )PERFECTLY in only one or two, easy passes.
                >
                > Looks kinda like a can-opener (about same size and shape, but at both
                > ends.....i.e. same general width and thickness, with turned up ends
                > and rounded corners.......but here's the working part. At the curve
                > bend in each end, is a cut out oval hole with sharpened edges.
                > The oval hole at one end, is a different size than at the other.
                >
                > You pull it, WITH grain of wood, along the corner. It neatly,
                > perfectly, rounds the corners so beautifully you'll be flabbergasted
                > at the simplicity and easiness of the whole process.
                >
                > Highland Hardware, in Atlanta, has them (it's where I got my own,
                > years ago) They run (current price) 10.99 each....
                > http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?
                > PageAction=PRODSEARCH&txtSearch=corner%20&Page=2
                > It's called a 'cornering tool'
                >
                > Happy woodworking
                > Shara, who's getting my new Guildhall house wired by the end of this
                > week, and after a couple of years, living in an 8 x 10 shed, am about
                > to move into a heavenly abode of 2-stories, with an 18 x 40'
                > bedroom/solar, upstairs, with 16.5 foot cathederal ceilings !!!!!!
                > And twill become all a-decorated with tapestries, banners, wrought
                > iron candle chandaliers, huge candle-sticks, and wonderful furniture,
                > with an antique bed on a raised platform, and heavy drapes, around
                > it.......We Should be moved in, by the end of the month !!!!! The
                > Building inspector approving (it's being wired by his predecessor, so
                > I KNOW it's being done right) and the electric company being co-
                > operative in getting us hooked up....YYYYYYYYEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH!!!!
                > OUT of this closet, and Into something we can insulate and heat !!!!
                > And I'll have a wonderful large kitchen !!!! full of antique tools,
                > (kitchen ones, the wood-working ones are all in my shop, nearby)
                > S.
                >
                >
                > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself one
                > tonight.
                > >
                > > (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can make a
                > lot of
                > > them myself. )
                > >
                > >
                > > On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a
                > scraper to
                > > > dress some types of board edges. There's a good picture and
                > description on
                > > > *www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll house
                > > > mouldings are out-of-period.*
                > > >
                > > > * *
                > > >
                > > > *Master William*
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > ------------------------------
                > > >
                > > > *From:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
                > > > medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *leaking pen
                > > > *Sent:* Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
                > > > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                > > > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?
                > > >
                > > > On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@...<albionwood%40wildblue.net>>
                > > > wrote:
                > > > > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to keep
                > the
                > > > > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one within
                > reach at
                > > > > all times.
                > > > >
                > > > > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come with
                > the same
                > > > > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing the
                > face
                > > > > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine you'd
                > take a
                > > > > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at it.
                > > > >
                > > > > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions
                > that 14th
                > > > > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised me as
                > I would
                > > > > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the
                > difference by
                > > > > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of
                > some of
                > > > > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those
                > apprentices
                > > > > must have done with scratch stocks.
                > > > >
                > > > > Colin
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > leaking pen wrote:
                > > > > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my
                > repetoire.
                > > > > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it wasnt
                > all done
                > > > > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives? certain
                > > > > > techniques with saws? im curious.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Thanks.
                > > > > > Alexander the so so
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > > --
                > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --
                > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


                --
                That which yields isn't always weak.
              • WR
                ... My father told me of the trick he used when...well, anyway : every time his arm went up, he got the belt across his back, so he knew for certain how
                Message 7 of 24 , Jan 12, 2007
                  On 2007.01.13 14:27 leaking pen wrote:
                  > snort. personal rule, if you ever have the feeling you need to use
                  > something other than your hand to spank a child, a. you arent in a
                  > mental state to properly punish,

                  My father told me of the "trick" he used when...well, anyway <g>: every
                  time his arm went up, he "got the belt" across his back, so he knew for
                  certain how hard he was hitting. And for the record, catagorically
                  *refused* to allow anything more substantial than that. Also, I should
                  point out that he only went to the belt AFTER I had developed a good
                  butt-callous! (nobody ever GAVE me a spanking, I earned every one!)

                  > and b. the spanking wont do anything.

                  Generally speaking, no. :-)

                  >
                  > they are however being used with love, and heart shaped cuttouts are
                  > one of the options.
                  >
                  > (for bdsm use)

                  I wasn't gonna go there. :-)
                • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                  Make sure the holes are heart shapped so they will know it is being used with love!! James Cunningham Maker of Craftswomen child rearing tools Actually, the
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jan 12, 2007
                    Make sure the holes are heart shapped so they will know it is being used
                    with love!!

                    James Cunningham
                    Maker of Craftswomen child rearing tools

                    Actually, the exact application is to round out the corners of
                    spanking paddles , both 1 inch thick, and 1/2 to 1/4 inch thick, that
                    are being cut out on a band saw from planks, so that there is a smooth
                    curve off that wont cut into flesh when being used to spank people.

                    (you asked)
                  • leaking pen
                    snort. personal rule, if you ever have the feeling you need to use something other than your hand to spank a child, a. you arent in a mental state to
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jan 12, 2007
                      snort. personal rule, if you ever have the feeling you need to use
                      something other than your hand to spank a child, a. you arent in a
                      mental state to properly punish, and b. the spanking wont do anything.

                      they are however being used with love, and heart shaped cuttouts are
                      one of the options.

                      (for bdsm use)

                      On 1/12/07, James W. Pratt, Jr. <cunning@...> wrote:
                      > Make sure the holes are heart shapped so they will know it is being used
                      > with love!!
                      >
                      > James Cunningham
                      > Maker of Craftswomen child rearing tools
                      >
                      > Actually, the exact application is to round out the corners of
                      > spanking paddles , both 1 inch thick, and 1/2 to 1/4 inch thick, that
                      > are being cut out on a band saw from planks, so that there is a smooth
                      > curve off that wont cut into flesh when being used to spank people.
                      >
                      > (you asked)
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      That which yields isn't always weak.
                    • leaking pen
                      see, with my sister, spanking was used so rarely that it was a , hurt the pride, not the butt, kinda thing. at 10, a sudden quick pop on teh butt, and shed be
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jan 13, 2007
                        see, with my sister, spanking was used so rarely that it was a , hurt
                        the pride, not the butt, kinda thing. at 10, a sudden quick pop on
                        teh butt, and shed be standing there, open mouthed, with a, did i just
                        get spanked? deer in teh headlights look. it caused her to change her
                        behaviour immediately when she did do it.

                        (Seriously, if one is going to use pain for behaviour modification for
                        children, those electrc fence dog collars with a remote contrl work so
                        much better.

                        On 1/12/07, WR <wolfeyes@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > On 2007.01.13 14:27 leaking pen wrote:
                        > > snort. personal rule, if you ever have the feeling you need to use
                        > > something other than your hand to spank a child, a. you arent in a
                        > > mental state to properly punish,
                        >
                        > My father told me of the "trick" he used when...well, anyway <g>: every
                        > time his arm went up, he "got the belt" across his back, so he knew for
                        > certain how hard he was hitting. And for the record, catagorically
                        > *refused* to allow anything more substantial than that. Also, I should
                        > point out that he only went to the belt AFTER I had developed a good
                        > butt-callous! (nobody ever GAVE me a spanking, I earned every one!)
                        >
                        > > and b. the spanking wont do anything.
                        >
                        > Generally speaking, no. :-)
                        >
                        > >
                        > > they are however being used with love, and heart shaped cuttouts are
                        > > one of the options.
                        > >
                        > > (for bdsm use)
                        >
                        > I wasn't gonna go there. :-)
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        --
                        That which yields isn't always weak.
                      • windsingersmoon
                        Darn !!! Too late for MY two !!!! Their Dad was lost in a traffic accident when they were little, so I just used their Dad s belt to do the necessary deed when
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jan 22, 2007
                          Darn !!!

                          Too late for MY two !!!!

                          Their Dad was lost in a traffic accident when they were little, so I
                          just used their Dad's belt to do the necessary deed when it was
                          needed....made um kinda feel like their Dad still had a hand in
                          raising them up to become decent young men..... (I give the men-folk
                          in the Sca full credit for doing most of the Real male-guidance/role
                          model work that raised my two boys.......thankyou, where-ever you
                          are...for being so many surragate 'dads' to a couple of kids who
                          needed one !!!.)

                          With so much changing in the world, and so many folks objecting to
                          spanking the little monsters, I wound up asking my youngest, when he
                          turned 18/20-ish if he, in any way resented my having spanked
                          him/them ???

                          He looked at me like I'd lost my mind.
                          He informed me that I'd 'spanked', not beaten them.
                          And if he and his brother had objected to getting spanked, ALL they'd
                          had to do, was Not do, what they knew they'd get spanked for, if
                          caught. (he added that they hadn't Always gotten caught, so I still
                          owed them quite a few)
                          Also adding that when he eventually got married/had kids of his own,
                          he didn't care What the current view would be on such things, he was
                          darn well going to spank his own kids,.....he'd be (darned) if he
                          wanted to be raising spoiled brats !!!!!
                          Shara the proud mom
                          (ps, that gadget I suggested, works GREAT on major furniture AND
                          Spanking paddles !)

                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > ohh, and, i like that, actually. i was doing the rounding of the
                          > corners themselves with a sander. that works.
                          >
                          > On 1/11/07, windsingersmoon <asa.wood@...> wrote:
                          > > I've been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new
                          > > house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the
                          beginning
                          > > thread........but if I understand what's being sought
                          here....someone
                          > > wants a way to neatly round off the square corners of lumber for a
                          > > nice finished furniture look ????/
                          > >
                          > > There is a tool, specially made for this.
                          > > it'll easily do the job )PERFECTLY in only one or two, easy
                          passes.
                          > >
                          > > Looks kinda like a can-opener (about same size and shape, but at
                          both
                          > > ends.....i.e. same general width and thickness, with turned up
                          ends
                          > > and rounded corners.......but here's the working part. At the
                          curve
                          > > bend in each end, is a cut out oval hole with sharpened edges.
                          > > The oval hole at one end, is a different size than at the other.
                          > >
                          > > You pull it, WITH grain of wood, along the corner. It neatly,
                          > > perfectly, rounds the corners so beautifully you'll be
                          flabbergasted
                          > > at the simplicity and easiness of the whole process.
                          > >
                          > > Highland Hardware, in Atlanta, has them (it's where I got my own,
                          > > years ago) They run (current price) 10.99 each....
                          > > http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?
                          > > PageAction=PRODSEARCH&txtSearch=corner%20&Page=2
                          > > It's called a 'cornering tool'
                          > >
                          > > Happy woodworking
                          > > Shara, who's getting my new Guildhall house wired by the end of
                          this
                          > > week, and after a couple of years, living in an 8 x 10 shed, am
                          about
                          > > to move into a heavenly abode of 2-stories, with an 18 x 40'
                          > > bedroom/solar, upstairs, with 16.5 foot cathederal ceilings !!!!!!
                          > > And twill become all a-decorated with tapestries, banners, wrought
                          > > iron candle chandaliers, huge candle-sticks, and wonderful
                          furniture,
                          > > with an antique bed on a raised platform, and heavy drapes, around
                          > > it.......We Should be moved in, by the end of the month !!!!! The
                          > > Building inspector approving (it's being wired by his
                          predecessor, so
                          > > I KNOW it's being done right) and the electric company being co-
                          > > operative in getting us hooked up....YYYYYYYYEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH!!!!
                          > > OUT of this closet, and Into something we can insulate and
                          heat !!!!
                          > > And I'll have a wonderful large kitchen !!!! full of antique
                          tools,
                          > > (kitchen ones, the wood-working ones are all in my shop, nearby)
                          > > S.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@>
                          > > wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself
                          one
                          > > tonight.
                          > > >
                          > > > (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can
                          make a
                          > > lot of
                          > > > them myself. )
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a
                          > > scraper to
                          > > > > dress some types of board edges. There's a good picture and
                          > > description on
                          > > > > *www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll
                          house
                          > > > > mouldings are out-of-period.*
                          > > > >
                          > > > > * *
                          > > > >
                          > > > > *Master William*
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > ------------------------------
                          > > > >
                          > > > > *From:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
                          > > > > medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *leaking pen
                          > > > > *Sent:* Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
                          > > > > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          > > > > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?
                          > > > >
                          > > > > On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@<albionwood%
                          40wildblue.net>>
                          > > > > wrote:
                          > > > > > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to
                          keep
                          > > the
                          > > > > > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one
                          within
                          > > reach at
                          > > > > > all times.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come
                          with
                          > > the same
                          > > > > > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing
                          the
                          > > face
                          > > > > > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine
                          you'd
                          > > take a
                          > > > > > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at
                          it.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions
                          > > that 14th
                          > > > > > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised
                          me as
                          > > I would
                          > > > > > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the
                          > > difference by
                          > > > > > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of
                          > > some of
                          > > > > > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those
                          > > apprentices
                          > > > > > must have done with scratch stocks.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Colin
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > leaking pen wrote:
                          > > > > > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my
                          > > repetoire.
                          > > > > > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it
                          wasnt
                          > > all done
                          > > > > > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives?
                          certain
                          > > > > > > techniques with saws? im curious.
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Thanks.
                          > > > > > > Alexander the so so
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --
                          > > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --
                          > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          > --
                          > That which yields isn't always weak.
                          >
                        • leaking pen
                          yes, but you are obviously a rational adult who did what you did not out of anger, but as behaviour modification. unfortunatly, there are those that dont. ...
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jan 22, 2007
                            yes, but you are obviously a rational adult who did what you did not
                            out of anger, but as behaviour modification. unfortunatly, there are
                            those that dont.


                            On 1/22/07, windsingersmoon <asa.wood@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Darn !!!
                            >
                            > Too late for MY two !!!!
                            >
                            > Their Dad was lost in a traffic accident when they were little, so I
                            > just used their Dad's belt to do the necessary deed when it was
                            > needed....made um kinda feel like their Dad still had a hand in
                            > raising them up to become decent young men..... (I give the men-folk
                            > in the Sca full credit for doing most of the Real male-guidance/role
                            > model work that raised my two boys.......thankyou, where-ever you
                            > are...for being so many surragate 'dads' to a couple of kids who
                            > needed one !!!.)
                            >
                            > With so much changing in the world, and so many folks objecting to
                            > spanking the little monsters, I wound up asking my youngest, when he
                            > turned 18/20-ish if he, in any way resented my having spanked
                            > him/them ???
                            >
                            > He looked at me like I'd lost my mind.
                            > He informed me that I'd 'spanked', not beaten them.
                            > And if he and his brother had objected to getting spanked, ALL they'd
                            > had to do, was Not do, what they knew they'd get spanked for, if
                            > caught. (he added that they hadn't Always gotten caught, so I still
                            > owed them quite a few)
                            > Also adding that when he eventually got married/had kids of his own,
                            > he didn't care What the current view would be on such things, he was
                            > darn well going to spank his own kids,.....he'd be (darned) if he
                            > wanted to be raising spoiled brats !!!!!
                            > Shara the proud mom
                            > (ps, that gadget I suggested, works GREAT on major furniture AND
                            > Spanking paddles !)
                            >
                            > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > ohh, and, i like that, actually. i was doing the rounding of the
                            > > corners themselves with a sander. that works.
                            > >
                            > > On 1/11/07, windsingersmoon <asa.wood@...> wrote:
                            > > > I've been out-of-the-loop for quite awhile (Trying to build a new
                            > > > house to live in) and have just dropped in, but missed the
                            > beginning
                            > > > thread........but if I understand what's being sought
                            > here....someone
                            > > > wants a way to neatly round off the square corners of lumber for a
                            > > > nice finished furniture look ????/
                            > > >
                            > > > There is a tool, specially made for this.
                            > > > it'll easily do the job )PERFECTLY in only one or two, easy
                            > passes.
                            > > >
                            > > > Looks kinda like a can-opener (about same size and shape, but at
                            > both
                            > > > ends.....i.e. same general width and thickness, with turned up
                            > ends
                            > > > and rounded corners.......but here's the working part. At the
                            > curve
                            > > > bend in each end, is a cut out oval hole with sharpened edges.
                            > > > The oval hole at one end, is a different size than at the other.
                            > > >
                            > > > You pull it, WITH grain of wood, along the corner. It neatly,
                            > > > perfectly, rounds the corners so beautifully you'll be
                            > flabbergasted
                            > > > at the simplicity and easiness of the whole process.
                            > > >
                            > > > Highland Hardware, in Atlanta, has them (it's where I got my own,
                            > > > years ago) They run (current price) 10.99 each....
                            > > > http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/index.asp?
                            > > > PageAction=PRODSEARCH&txtSearch=corner%20&Page=2
                            > > > It's called a 'cornering tool'
                            > > >
                            > > > Happy woodworking
                            > > > Shara, who's getting my new Guildhall house wired by the end of
                            > this
                            > > > week, and after a couple of years, living in an 8 x 10 shed, am
                            > about
                            > > > to move into a heavenly abode of 2-stories, with an 18 x 40'
                            > > > bedroom/solar, upstairs, with 16.5 foot cathederal ceilings !!!!!!
                            > > > And twill become all a-decorated with tapestries, banners, wrought
                            > > > iron candle chandaliers, huge candle-sticks, and wonderful
                            > furniture,
                            > > > with an antique bed on a raised platform, and heavy drapes, around
                            > > > it.......We Should be moved in, by the end of the month !!!!! The
                            > > > Building inspector approving (it's being wired by his
                            > predecessor, so
                            > > > I KNOW it's being done right) and the electric company being co-
                            > > > operative in getting us hooked up....YYYYYYYYEEEEEEAAAAAAHHHH!!!!
                            > > > OUT of this closet, and Into something we can insulate and
                            > heat !!!!
                            > > > And I'll have a wonderful large kitchen !!!! full of antique
                            > tools,
                            > > > (kitchen ones, the wood-working ones are all in my shop, nearby)
                            > > > S.
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@>
                            > > > wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > That is absolutely perfect. thanks. i think ill make myself
                            > one
                            > > > tonight.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > (and see, this is what i love most about hand tools. i can
                            > make a
                            > > > lot of
                            > > > > them myself. )
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > On 1/11/07, Bill McNutt <mcnutt@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > It's a tool used kind of like a drawknife and kind of like a
                            > > > scraper to
                            > > > > > dress some types of board edges. There's a good picture and
                            > > > description on
                            > > > > > *www.redsword.com/dollhouse/moulding.htm, although the doll
                            > house
                            > > > > > mouldings are out-of-period.*
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > * *
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > *Master William*
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > ------------------------------
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > *From:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
                            > > > > > medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] *On Behalf Of *leaking pen
                            > > > > > *Sent:* Wednesday, January 10, 2007 9:46 PM
                            > > > > > *To:* medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > > > > > *Subject:* Re: [MedievalSawdust] Rounding of edges
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > aaannndd.. whats a scratch stock?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > On 1/10/07, AlbionWood <albionwood@<albionwood%
                            > 40wildblue.net>>
                            > > > > > wrote:
                            > > > > > > I use block planes for this all the time. I can't seem to
                            > keep
                            > > > the
                            > > > > > > little buggers on the shelf - there just has to be one
                            > within
                            > > > reach at
                            > > > > > > all times.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Also remember that handmade boards don't necessarily come
                            > with
                            > > > the same
                            > > > > > > sort of edges as modern milled lumber. If you're smoothing
                            > the
                            > > > face
                            > > > > > > with a handplane, it's not much of a stretch to imagine
                            > you'd
                            > > > take a
                            > > > > > > couple of passes to knock off the arrises while you're at
                            > it.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > I think Hewitt, of the fabulous timber-frame books, mentions
                            > > > that 14th
                            > > > > > > c. mouldings were done with scratch stock. That surprised
                            > me as
                            > > > I would
                            > > > > > > have guessed planes, but I bet old Hewitt could tell the
                            > > > difference by
                            > > > > > > the tracks they left. When you look at the size and depth of
                            > > > some of
                            > > > > > > those mouldings you really appreciate how much work those
                            > > > apprentices
                            > > > > > > must have done with scratch stocks.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Colin
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > leaking pen wrote:
                            > > > > > > > Hey all, looking for new old techniques to add to my
                            > > > repetoire.
                            > > > > > > > Anyone have any info on rounding of edges? Im sure it
                            > wasnt
                            > > > all done
                            > > > > > > > by hand with scrapers. were there shaped draw knives?
                            > certain
                            > > > > > > > techniques with saws? im curious.
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > Thanks.
                            > > > > > > > Alexander the so so
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > --
                            > > > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --
                            > > > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --
                            > > That which yields isn't always weak.
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            --
                            That which yields isn't always weak.
                          • windsingersmoon
                            I d been beaten. That s not love, it s abuse. I knew my own would end when my mother pulled him off of me, 2 strikes more away from a trip to the hospital. My
                            Message 13 of 24 , Jan 22, 2007
                              I'd been beaten.

                              That's not love, it's abuse.

                              I knew my own would end when my mother pulled him off of me, 2
                              strikes more away from a trip to the hospital.

                              My boys knew, precisely, when their's would end.
                              3 licks per offense.

                              3 for the offense
                              3 more if it was a repeat offense
                              and 3 more if they lied to me.

                              It got added up, before, and counted down, during, by both them, and
                              me......I never wanted it on my concience that I'd intentionally beat
                              one of my boys in un-controlled anger. I hid and licked my
                              wounds after my beatings.

                              My kids didn't. Had a good cry, thought about the situation, then
                              came to me, sheepishly, with some small peace offering to let me know
                              they were sorry and wanted everything to be okay again.

                              What's REALLY funny, is that Somewhere around here, I still have a 3
                              quarter inch thick 'paddle' that one of them made, at school, and
                              gave me, proudly, to use on them if I ever couldn't find their Dad's
                              belt.........I never used it........ya just don't hit kids with
                              lumber !........but he surely knew I wouldn't when he made and gave
                              it to me.........his first year of highschool, shop project.

                              (Ahhhhhhhhh, I Understand now !!!! TEEN-AGERS !!!!
                              Okay.
                              maybe it's a simple matter of needing to get the message more clearly
                              delivered.......<<<<<GGGGG>>>>>

                              Now, back to our regularly schedualed program.....
                              BTW
                              Looks like I'll maybe be moving into the Guldhall, tomarrow.
                              And the first thing on my in-house agenda, is going to be experiments
                              to solve the mystery of how Linseed oil for woodworking was made.

                              I'll keep careful records, and share the results asap.

                              I've already gahtered everything I may need, of a Medieval tool type
                              nature, over there, just waiting for the move to get started on it.
                              <G>
                              Shara who is very optimistic that I know the solution to the
                              mystery.....

                              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "leaking pen" <itsatrap@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > yes, but you are obviously a rational adult who did what you did not
                              > out of anger, but as behaviour modification. unfortunatly, there
                              are
                              > those that dont.
                              >
                              >
                            • JBRMM266@aol.com
                              My father had a whole array of slapparatus that he would occasionally name, for increasingly grave offenses. #1 was his bare hand, #2 his belt, #3 his
                              Message 14 of 24 , Jan 23, 2007
                                My father had a whole array of "slapparatus" that he would occasionally name, for increasingly grave offenses. #1 was his bare hand, #2 his belt, #3 his hairbrush, and so on up to #10, a paddle presented to him by his fraternity. That baby was about 2-1/2 feet long and four inches wide, nicely stained and varnished, with the letters and his name engraved in it (no, no holes. That paddle was intended more as a showpiece than an instrument of correction).   I'm not sure what became of that paddle. I went into a different fraternity, so I didn't want it!
                                 
                                The mere knowledge that such an array existed was enough to keep me in line most of the time.   And in fact, only once did he ever use anything beyond #1, when he had me get the hairbrush from his dresser and bend over my bed. By this time I was one scared puppy.  He then took a mighty wind-up and  . . . gave me what amounted to a love-tap. I was almost disappointed . . . almost!
                                 
                                When he DID administer a real spanking, it was with my mother as witness, and he never gave me more than four strokes, carefully timed.  I don't consider myself to have been abused in receiving such attention.
                                 
                                Once, just once, he hauled off and swatted me upside the head. Had it happened more than once I might've considered it abuse, but one can, I think, make allowances for an isolated lapse.
                                 
                                Ruefully
                                Donal
                                 
                                 

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