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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Capstan Table

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  • AlbionWood
    Yes, it s an inside joke. And, like all jokes, it isn t funny when you explain it. My personal objection to RO isn t so much that it s less authentic (a weak
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 12, 2006
      Yes, it's an inside joke. And, like all jokes, it isn't funny when you
      explain it.

      My personal objection to RO isn't so much that it's less authentic (a
      weak argument) as that it isn't a good choice for most projects. The
      working properties of RO are more like Douglas Fir than anything else:
      it is coarse-grained and splintery, difficult to carve well, doesn't
      take details, moves a lot in service (more than WO), etc. Its only
      redeeming features on my view are wide availability and price. With a
      little more effort and not much more money, you can get White Oak which,
      to my eye, is a lot prettier and a lot better to work with. (Still
      tough to carve, though. After this throne project is done, I hope I
      never have to chisel kiln-dried WO again.) If you are going to the
      trouble to make something nice enough to merit a hardwood, why settle
      for the crappiest hardwood on the rack?

      There. See how funny that is?
      8-)

      Colin


      kjworz@... wrote:
      > I THINK the reference is to....
      >
      > The paradigm sticklers have argued that the most feely available hardwood available in North America, Red Oak, has no real European conterpart, so using it in period furniture in insufficiently authentic. North American White Oak is much closer to European counterparts as to be nigh indistinguishable and thus preferable.
      >
      >
    • JBRMM266@aol.com
      Thank yew ... From: kjworz@comcast.net To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com; medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tue, 12 Dec 2006 11:04 AM Subject: Re:
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 12, 2006
         Thank yew
         
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: kjworz@...
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com; medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tue, 12 Dec 2006 11:04 AM
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Capstan Table

        I THINK the reference is to....
        
        The paradigm sticklers have argued that the most feely available hardwood 
        available in North America, Red Oak, has no real European conterpart, so using 
        it in period furniture in insufficiently authentic.  North American White Oak is 
        much closer to European counterparts as to be nigh indistinguishable and thus 
        preferable.  
        
        --
        -Chris Schwartz
        Silver Spring, MD
        
        
        
         

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      • Steve Vaught
        Oh I do not mock you. Red Oak for one isn t period, and is a pain to work with. The open grain structure makes it hard to finish and rough to work with. I
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 12, 2006
          Oh I do not mock you.  Red Oak for one isn't period, and is a pain to work with.  The open grain structure makes it hard to finish and rough to work with.  I just finished a glastonbury with quarter sawn white oak seat and back supports, ash arms and walnut seat and back boards.
           
          I could easily crank out a bunch in red oak purchased from home depot, reverse the pattern so the top is wider than the seat and sell them at a reasonable price but I just can't bring myself to do it.  I may contemplate making them in maple.
           
          Steve
          President
          Lord Grey's Retinue
          www.lordgreys.com

          AlbionWood <albionwood@...> wrote:
          A kindred spirit!  Or do you mock me, sirrah?  :-D

          Colin


          Steve Vaught wrote:
          As long as it is not red oak
           
          Steve

          Bill McNutt <mcnutt@pobox. com> wrote:
          Not the first thing, I’m afraid.  I ran into it on one of the tech blogs I follow.  Any anything made out of solid oak is appropriate for this forum, right?
          Will




          Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

        • Avery Austringer
          In Medieval Europe they didn t have red oak. (Technically they didn t have American white oak either, but what they had looks so much like American white oak
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 13, 2006
            In Medieval Europe they didn't have red oak. (Technically they didn't
            have American white oak either, but what they had looks so much like
            American white oak as to be pretty trivial.)

            Avery

            > It appears that I'm on the outside of an inside joke . . . .

            >> A kindred spirit! Or do you mock me, sirrah? :-D

            >>> As long as it is not red oak

            >>>> Not the first thing, I´m afraid. I ran into it on one of the tech
            >>>> blogs I follow. Any anything made out of solid oak is appropriate
            >>>> for this forum, right?
          • AlbionWood
            Definitely a kindred spirit, I see. One of my goals for next year is to work with something other than white oak for a change. I m thinking Birch might be
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 13, 2006
              Definitely a kindred spirit, I see.

              One of my goals for next year is to work with something other than white
              oak for a change. I'm thinking Birch might be nice.

              Colin


              Steve Vaught wrote:
              > Oh I do not mock you. Red Oak for one isn't period, and is a pain to
              > work with. The open grain structure makes it hard to finish and rough
              > to work with.
            • Eric
              You might want to try Ash too. Nice stuff to work with, though I haven t tried carving it yet, and it s at the lighter end of the hardwood spectrum. Eirikr
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 13, 2006
                You might want to try Ash too. Nice stuff to work with, though I
                haven't tried carving it yet, and it's at the lighter end of the
                hardwood spectrum.

                Eirikr
                Ashgrove, Barony of Angels, Caid

                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, AlbionWood <albionwood@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Definitely a kindred spirit, I see.
                >
                > One of my goals for next year is to work with something other than
                white
                > oak for a change. I'm thinking Birch might be nice.
                >
                > Colin
                >
              • AlbionWood
                I ve used ash quite a lot, especially for beds, where the stiffness-to-weight ratio really counts. I like it a lot. It carves pretty well too. I especially
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 13, 2006
                  I've used ash quite a lot, especially for beds, where the
                  stiffness-to-weight ratio really counts. I like it a lot. It carves
                  pretty well too. I especially like the heartwood, which often displays
                  some interesting color variation, but is hard to find as most people
                  want the pure-white stuff (which I find bland). It does take stain
                  quite well.

                  It can be tricky stuff to plane, though. Grain reversals on the faces
                  cause a lot of tearout. Need really sharp tools. (What else is new!)

                  Colin


                  Eric wrote:
                  > You might want to try Ash too. Nice stuff to work with, though I
                  > haven't tried carving it yet, and it's at the lighter end of the
                  > hardwood spectrum.
                  >
                  >
                • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                  I ve made all my crossbow stocks from white ash. It is as hard as oak but rots and stain if it is put on wet ground. James Cunningham
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 13, 2006
                    I've made all my crossbow stocks from white ash.  It is as hard as oak but rots and stain if it is put on wet ground.
                     
                    James Cunningham
                  • gunwaldt
                    ... But the explaination lets us unworthy rabble feel a little more included. Thank you for taking the time. Gunwaldt
                    Message 9 of 17 , Dec 18, 2006
                      Colin wrote:
                      > Yes, it's an inside joke. And, like all jokes,
                      > it isn't funny when you explain it.

                      But the explaination lets us unworthy rabble feel a little more
                      included. Thank you for taking the time.

                      Gunwaldt
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