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Re: [MedievalSawdust] lastest proect and questions for the list

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  • M Descoteau
    I m not sure if this is period or not, did they have turpentine or the like back then?? if so I got a good recipe from a wood working mag I got for just such
    Message 1 of 31 , Oct 10, 2006
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      I'm not sure if this is period or not, did they have
      turpentine or the like back then?? if so I got a good
      recipe from a wood working mag I got for just such a
      finnish.

      it calls for equal portions of 3 items, Boiled Linseed
      oil, pure gum spirits of Turpentine, and beeswax.

      Combine the Turpentine and beeswax (take and shave the
      beeswax into small pieces) and let it desolve
      overnight.

      Add the linseed oil, and use it like you would a oil
      finnish, after you get a few coats on like you would
      for a oil finnish, buff it out, it only give a low
      sheen finnish, but it is real easy to use.

      And yes, it looks great on items that you plan to use
      a lot. :-)

      Mike

      --- Karl Christoffers <interestingclutter@...>
      wrote:

      > Hello the List,
      >
      > --- "Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)"
      > <yahoo@...>
      > wrote:
      >
      > (snip, snip)
      > >
      > > Lastly, the types of wood we have available today
      > > don't come close to
      > > comparing to many of the woods that our ancestors
      > > used a thousand years
      > > ago. An old growth tree could yield planks easily
      > > 16-24" wide without
      > > going through the heard of the tree. Now to get
      > that
      > > large of a plank
      > > requires a buildup of multiple planks, or an
      > > engineered alternative.
      > >
      > > So, depending on the recreation, plywood can be a
      > > quite acceptable
      > > alternative.
      > >
      > > Haraldr Bassi
      > >
      > >
      > During the thousand years of SCA history, not
      > everyone
      > in Europe or more particularly on the British Isles
      > had old growth timber to work with. In England
      > umpteenth-growth coppiced wood was more the rule for
      > everyday stuff. The two books discovered by my lady
      > wife which I have only begun to work through are:
      >
      > Rackham, Oliver
      > Trees and Woodland in the British Landscape - The
      > Complete History of Britian's Trees, Woods and
      > Hedgerows, Revised Edition,
      > Phoenix Press 1976, Revised 1990,
      > Distributed in the U.S. by Sterling Publishing Co.
      > ISBN 1 84212 469 2 and
      >
      > Rackham, Oliver
      > The Illustrated History of the Countryside
      > Wiedenfeld and Nicholson 2003
      > Distributed in the U.S. by Sterling Publishing Co.
      > ISBN 0 297 84335 4
      >
      > We got them from the David Brown Book Co.
      >
      > -Malcolm macGregor
      >
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    • Beth and Bob Matney
      I am sorry, but I have to disagree with you . Ammonia is VERY toxic but your nose will detect it at even lower levels. It can permanently damage your lungs. I
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 28, 2006
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        I am sorry, but I have to disagree with you . Ammonia is VERY toxic but
        your nose will detect it at even lower levels. It can permanently damage
        your lungs. I have worked with it professionally at chemical (fertilizer)
        plants and also vividly remember when the ammonia truck fell off the upper
        level of the I-610/US59/US75 in west Houston.. and the evacuation of the
        area (I lived nearby). All vegetation in the immediate area (including
        trees) died... as did some people. It is readily dissolvable in water and
        does degrade fairly quickly... so no long term hazard.

        I do not discourage it's use... but take appropriate precautions.

        Beth

        At 11:07 AM 10/28/2006, you wrote:
        >On the plus side,
        >it is not toxic, and in fact the nitrogen is beneficial to soil - so you
        >can simply pour it on the ground when you're done.
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