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lastest proect and questions for the list

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    I just finished two pairs of glastonbury chairs, One pair in white oak for a friend and one pair as an experiment in plywood. The oak chairs look great. Photo
    Message 1 of 31 , Sep 29, 2006
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      I just finished two pairs of glastonbury chairs, One pair in white oak for a friend and one pair as an experiment in plywood. The oak chairs look great.

      Photo to be loaded into my folder next...

      Ok, before you say anything about why plywood....

      1. it was free
      2. I wanted to see what would happenand how it would look.
      3. I won't care about throwing it into the back of the van,
      plopping down into it in armor,
      accidentally getting it rained on....
      etc.

      I had a bunch of 3/8" russian birch plywood ( 15 x 60" ) and access to a
      hydraulic press. tadaa! 1 1/8" I put a darker stain on it and it seems
      to be fine. I'm willing to bet the oak chairs will long outlive the plywood.
      But by then who knows what I'll want.... I simply did this to satisfy my
      curiousity.

      I'm actually replacing two other chairs I made with plywood ( coffer chairs based
      on Charles Oakley's design ) +6 years ago. Thay are still in good shape,
      I'm giving them to a squire brother and his wife.

      Here are a few questions to spark a discussion.

      Where is the line between practical and period?
      When are modern materials more sensible?
      When does " If they had it, they'd have used it." apply?
      ( this is not about period = right and not period = wrong. )


      The main reason I have done any SCA stuff in plywood is I think anything
      in plywood looks better than it's counterpart in plastic. It's just to show how
      easy it can be to replace it.


      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '
    • Beth and Bob Matney
      I am sorry, but I have to disagree with you . Ammonia is VERY toxic but your nose will detect it at even lower levels. It can permanently damage your lungs. I
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 28, 2006
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        I am sorry, but I have to disagree with you . Ammonia is VERY toxic but
        your nose will detect it at even lower levels. It can permanently damage
        your lungs. I have worked with it professionally at chemical (fertilizer)
        plants and also vividly remember when the ammonia truck fell off the upper
        level of the I-610/US59/US75 in west Houston.. and the evacuation of the
        area (I lived nearby). All vegetation in the immediate area (including
        trees) died... as did some people. It is readily dissolvable in water and
        does degrade fairly quickly... so no long term hazard.

        I do not discourage it's use... but take appropriate precautions.

        Beth

        At 11:07 AM 10/28/2006, you wrote:
        >On the plus side,
        >it is not toxic, and in fact the nitrogen is beneficial to soil - so you
        >can simply pour it on the ground when you're done.
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