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Saw this on ebay

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  • William A. Brown
    Can anyone give any original date for a tool like this? Or something similar.
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 8, 2006

      Can anyone give any original date for a tool like this? Or something similar.

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1

       

      Domingos

       

      William Brown

      dba Namesayers Graphics

      We help you say your name

       

    • Sasha_khan
      I believe that the stitching pony like the one in the auction start showing up in the early 19th century. The stitching clam is probably more common back to
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 8, 2006
        I believe that the stitching pony like the one in the
        auction start showing up in the early 19th century.
        The stitching 'clam' is probably more common back to
        the early 18th century - before that? I'm not sure.

        Sasha



        --- "William A. Brown" <bill@...> wrote:

        > Can anyone give any original date for a tool like
        > this? Or something
        > similar.
        >
        >
        >
        <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=
        > ADME:B:SS:US:1>
        >
        http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=A
        > DME:B:SS:US:1
        >
        >
        >
        > Domingos
        >
        >
        >
        > William Brown
        >
        > dba Namesayers Graphics
        >
        > "We help you say your name"
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Arthur Slaughter
        I am not sure on the dates for this item. But in this area I would hardly call it a rare piece. I know of at least three in the same town(small one at that)
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 8, 2006
          I am not sure on the dates for this item. But in this area I would hardly
          call it a rare piece. I know of at least three in the same town(small one
          at that) in antiques stores.
          THL Finnr


          >From: "William A. Brown" <bill@...>
          >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
          >Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2006 18:04:02 -0500
          >
          >Can anyone give any original date for a tool like this? Or something
          >similar.
          >
          >
          ><http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=
          >ADME:B:SS:US:1>
          >http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=A
          >DME:B:SS:US:1
          >
          >
          >
          >Domingos
          >
          >
          >
          >William Brown
          >
          >dba Namesayers Graphics
          >
          >"We help you say your name"
          >
          >
          >

          _________________________________________________________________
          Get real-time traffic reports with Windows Live Local Search
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        • William A. Brown
          Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench close to this but of an earlier design. Any suggestions, I don t really need plans just a drawing or picture
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 8, 2006

            Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench close to this but of an earlier design. Any suggestions, I don’t really need plans just a drawing or picture would be more then helpful.

             

            Domingos of Arenal

             

             


            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Arthur Slaughter
            Sent: Friday, September 08, 2006 6:38 PM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

             

            I am not sure on the dates for this item. But in this area I would hardly
            call it a rare piece. I know of at least three in the same town(small one
            at that) in antiques stores.
            THL Finnr

            >From: "William A. Brown" <
            href="mailto:bill%40namesayers.com">bill@namesayers. com>
            >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
            >To: <medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com>
            >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
            >Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2006 18:04:02 -0500
            >
            >Can anyone give any original date for a tool like this? Or something
            >similar.
            >
            >
            ><
            href="http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=">http://cgi.ebay. com/ws/eBayISAPI .dll?ViewItem& item=13002443650 8&ssPageName=
            >ADME:B:SS:US: 1>
            >
            href="http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130024436508&ssPageName=A">http://cgi.ebay. com/ws/eBayISAPI .dll?ViewItem& item=13002443650 8&ssPageName= A
            >DME:B:SS:US: 1
            >
            >
            >
            >Domingos
            >
            >
            >
            >William Brown
            >
            >dba Namesayers Graphics
            >
            >"We help you say your name"
            >
            >
            >

            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
            Get real-time traffic reports with Windows Live Local Search
            http://local. live.com/ default.aspx? v=2&cp=42. 336065~-109. 392273&style= r&lvl=4&scene= 3712634&trfc= 1

          • AEbsynth Byvordhr
            ... You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory. AEbby __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 8, 2006
              --- "William A. Brown" <bill@...> wrote:

              > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
              > close to this but of an
              > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
              > plans just a drawing or
              > picture would be more then helpful.

              You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

              AEbby

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com
            • William A. Brown
              Yea, but that is boring. I wan to make one, replica of the design they would have used in the 15th century. Domingos _____ From:
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 9, 2006

                Yea, but that is boring. I wan to make one, replica of the design they would have used in the 15th century.

                 

                Domingos

                 


                From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                 

                --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                > close to this but of an
                > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                > plans just a drawing or
                > picture would be more then helpful.

                You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                AEbby

                ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail. yahoo.com

              • William A. Brown
                I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 9, 2006

                  I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself. The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this intentional or bad sharpening.

                   

                  Domingos

                   


                  From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                  Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                  To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                   

                  --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                  > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                  > close to this but of an
                  > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                  > plans just a drawing or
                  > picture would be more then helpful.

                  You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                  AEbby

                  ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail. yahoo.com

                • C N Schwartz
                  There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for drawknives, each for a different application/profession. And preference, of course. And
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 9, 2006
                     
                     
                    There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for drawknives, each for a different application/profession.  And preference, of course.  And that's just one of the variables.  Don't forget handle angle, length, blade width, etc. There were as many types of drawknives as there are circular saw blades today. 
                     
                    The groove in the one you have is probably a way for guiding your sharpening stone to make the knife easier to sharpen.  The curve is either an inshave (if it curves that way) or a scheme to make it easier to slice your wood by have a built in skew angle of attack (if it curves that way).  I'm not sure from your description which way it curves.
                     
                    My advice, use the drawknives.  Try bevel up and bevel down.  Decide what works best for you in the various applications.  I prefer an 8 inch Buck Bros drawknife for various spoke like things, but the control a small knife offers would be useless if I was trying to debark logs for a cabin.  For that something big and honking is called for.  And 8 inches gives me little chance for slicing action.
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                    Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:10 AM
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                    I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself. The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this intentional or bad sharpening.

                    Domingos


                    From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                    Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                    To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                    Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                    --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                    > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                    > close to this but of an
                    > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                    > plans just a drawing or
                    > picture would be more then helpful.

                    You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                    AEbby

                    ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                    Do You Yahoo!?
                    Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                    http://mail. yahoo.com

                  • William A. Brown
                    Thank you for the great reply CN. I will have some picks up on the list before long of the two I spoke of. I am interested also in producing a bowyers/ shaving
                    Message 9 of 12 , Sep 10, 2006

                      Thank you for the great reply CN. I will have some picks up on the list before long of the two I spoke of. I am interested also in producing a bowyers/ shaving bench. I made and used one design but it was awkward and the grip of the material (in my case a bow stave) allowed it to slip on enough occasions the bench eventually found itself dismantles and used on other less prestigious projects. What I would like is to find a bench design that would be used mainly for shaving bows but could be used for many other things, Easy to clamp and has a strong grip…any advise here?

                       

                      Domingos

                       


                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                      Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:47 PM
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                       

                       

                       

                      There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for drawknives, each for a different application/ profession.  And preference, of course.  And that's just one of the variables.  Don't forget handle angle, length, blade width, etc. There were as many types of drawknives as there are circular saw blades today. 

                       

                      The groove in the one you have is probably a way for guiding your sharpening stone to make the knife easier to sharpen.  The curve is either an inshave (if it curves that way) or a scheme to make it easier to slice your wood by have a built in skew angle of attack (if it curves that way).  I'm not sure from your description which way it curves.

                       

                      My advice, use the drawknives.  Try bevel up and bevel down.  Decide what works best for you in the various applications.  I prefer an 8 inch Buck Bros drawknife for various spoke like things, but the control a small knife offers would be useless if I was trying to debark logs for a cabin.  For that something big and honking is called for.  And 8 inches gives me little chance for slicing action.

                       

                       

                       

                       

                       

                       

                       

                       

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                      Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:10 AM
                      To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                      I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself. The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this intentional or bad sharpening.

                      Domingos


                      From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                      Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                      To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                      Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                      --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                      > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                      > close to this but of an
                      > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                      > plans just a drawing or
                      > picture would be more then helpful.

                      You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                      AEbby

                      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                      Do You Yahoo!?
                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                      http://mail. yahoo.com

                    • C N Schwartz
                      Are you looking for a way to mount the bow horizontally at bench height? If so the poppet system on this lathe may work for you. Note figure 8.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Sep 10, 2006
                         
                         
                        Are you looking for a way to mount the bow horizontally at bench height?  If so the poppet system on this lathe may work for you.  Note figure 8.  http://www.greenwoodworking.com/evplathe.htm  You wouldn't need the lathe specific stuff like the spring pole or the tool rest, and you'd have to fashion something to keep the bow from spinning when you are shaving it, maybe.  
                         
                        Or you could just make a shave horse ala: http://www.greenwoodworking.com/shorse.htm  I don't know the specific requirements of work a bowyer needs, so maybe the shave horse isn't ideal.
                         
                        Other thoughts for bowyers that leap to mind is a sticking board like a sash maker uses for making windows, or the frame a fly fishing pole maker uses like these:
                        and
                         
                        Again, my ignorance of bow making leaves me in the dark on how appropriate a holding method those are, but that's where my mind wanders when thinking of bow making.
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                        Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 10:46 AM
                        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                        Thank you for the great reply CN. I will have some picks up on the list before long of the two I spoke of. I am interested also in producing a bowyers/ shaving bench. I made and used one design but it was awkward and the grip of the material (in my case a bow stave) allowed it to slip on enough occasions the bench eventually found itself dismantles and used on other less prestigious projects. What I would like is to find a bench design that would be used mainly for shaving bows but could be used for many other things, Easy to clamp and has a strong grip…any advise here?

                        Domingos


                        From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                        Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:47 PM
                        To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                        There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for drawknives, each for a different application/ profession.  And preference, of course.  And that's just one of the variables.  Don't forget handle angle, length, blade width, etc. There were as many types of drawknives as there are circular saw blades today. 

                        The groove in the one you have is probably a way for guiding your sharpening stone to make the knife easier to sharpen.  The curve is either an inshave (if it curves that way) or a scheme to make it easier to slice your wood by have a built in skew angle of attack (if it curves that way).  I'm not sure from your description which way it curves.

                        My advice, use the drawknives.  Try bevel up and bevel down.  Decide what works best for you in the various applications.  I prefer an 8 inch Buck Bros drawknife for various spoke like things, but the control a small knife offers would be useless if I was trying to debark logs for a cabin.  For that something big and honking is called for.  And 8 inches gives me little chance for slicing action.

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                        Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:10 AM
                        To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                        I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself. The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this intentional or bad sharpening.

                        Domingos


                        From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                        Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                        To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                        Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                        --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                        > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                        > close to this but of an
                        > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                        > plans just a drawing or
                        > picture would be more then helpful.

                        You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                        AEbby

                        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                        Do You Yahoo!?
                        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                        http://mail. yahoo.com

                      • William A. Brown
                        Those are some great examples. The standard shaving horse is almost identical to the one I built, its drawback is the amount of bite I was able to get when I
                        Message 11 of 12 , Sep 10, 2006

                          Those are some great examples. The standard shaving horse is almost identical to the one I built, its drawback is the amount of bite I was able to get when I had a full stave placed in it. ( 72” quartersawn stave about 4 inchs wide). I like the foot pressure method as it keeps both of my hands free to work the wood.  The problem really shows itself when bringing the stave down from full size to a slender bow, when reducing the stave the bench really looses traction and if your bow slips at the wrong time and you cut into the grain, ruining the bow to nothing more then kindling. I am beginning to think what I need may not be a Wonder Bench but two or three benches that server the purpose of each stage in the bow making process.. Thanks again for the help, I am going to take the page you sent on the bamboo fly rods and try to make it work for creating bamboo arrows.

                           

                          Domingos

                           


                          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                          Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 11:08 AM
                          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                           

                           

                           

                          Are you looking for a way to mount the bow horizontally at bench height?  If so the poppet system on this lathe may work for you.  Note figure 8.  http://www.greenwoo dworking. com/evplathe. htm  You wouldn't need the lathe specific stuff like the spring pole or the tool rest, and you'd have to fashion something to keep the bow from spinning when you are shaving it, maybe.  

                           

                          Or you could just make a shave horse ala: http://www.greenwoo dworking. com/shorse. htm  I don't know the specific requirements of work a bowyer needs, so maybe the shave horse isn't ideal.

                           

                          Other thoughts for bowyers that leap to mind is a sticking board like a sash maker uses for making windows, or the frame a fly fishing pole maker uses like these:

                          and

                           

                          Again, my ignorance of bow making leaves me in the dark on how appropriate a holding method those are, but that's where my mind wanders when thinking of bow making.

                           

                           

                           

                           

                           

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                          Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 10:46 AM
                          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                          Thank you for the great reply CN. I will have some picks up on the list before long of the two I spoke of. I am interested also in producing a bowyers/ shaving bench. I made and used one design but it was awkward and the grip of the material (in my case a bow stave) allowed it to slip on enough occasions the bench eventually found itself dismantles and used on other less prestigious projects. What I would like is to find a bench design that would be used mainly for shaving bows but could be used for many other things, Easy to clamp and has a strong grip…any advise here?

                          Domingos


                          From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                          Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:47 PM
                          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                          There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for drawknives, each for a different application/ profession.  And preference, of course.  And that's just one of the variables.  Don't forget handle angle, length, blade width, etc. There were as many types of drawknives as there are circular saw blades today. 

                          The groove in the one you have is probably a way for guiding your sharpening stone to make the knife easier to sharpen.  The curve is either an inshave (if it curves that way) or a scheme to make it easier to slice your wood by have a built in skew angle of attack (if it curves that way).  I'm not sure from your description which way it curves.

                          My advice, use the drawknives.  Try bevel up and bevel down.  Decide what works best for you in the various applications.  I prefer an 8 inch Buck Bros drawknife for various spoke like things, but the control a small knife offers would be useless if I was trying to debark logs for a cabin.  For that something big and honking is called for.  And 8 inches gives me little chance for slicing action.

                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                          Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:10 AM
                          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                          I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself. The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this intentional or bad sharpening.

                          Domingos


                          From: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: medievalsaw dust@yahoogroups .com ] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                          Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                          To: medievalsawdust@ yahoogroups. com
                          Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay

                          --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. com> wrote:

                          > Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                          > close to this but of an
                          > earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                          > plans just a drawing or
                          > picture would be more then helpful.

                          You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.

                          AEbby

                          ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                          Do You Yahoo!?
                          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                          http://mail. yahoo.com

                        • Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)
                          You need to have either the head or the work surface adjustable. There is otherwise no way possible to use the shave bench on different sized material. There
                          Message 12 of 12 , Sep 10, 2006
                            You need to have either the head or the work surface adjustable. There
                            is otherwise no way possible to use the shave bench on different sized
                            material. There are only two ways to adjust them that I am aware of,
                            have various pivot points for the head/foot assembly, or have different
                            stops for the bench riser.

                            The style we have in our storage trailer at Pennsic is one of the
                            typical green woodworking shave horses, it features the parallel bar
                            with three cross rod design. That gives it a fixed pivot point so the
                            work surface has several holes drilled where we can put a dowel in
                            different locations to change the distance from work surface to the
                            clamp on the top bar. We have used it everywhere from 7" diameter to sub
                            1/2" sticks.

                            In addition, you can add leather to the clamp bar and work surface to
                            give more friction to the clamp.

                            An older style workbench seems to be the leather foot clamp, which
                            featured a loop of leather belt with a stirrup for the foot that would
                            loop around the workpiece and then be tensioned by your foot.

                            I have been looking for several years and have not even found a clear
                            indication of a shave bench or shave horse into the 14th C. If anyone
                            knows of one, please let me know the citations.

                            Thanks,
                            Haraldr

                            William A. Brown wrote:
                            > Those are some great examples. The standard shaving horse is almost
                            > identical to the one I built, its drawback is the amount of bite I was able
                            > to get when I had a full stave placed in it. ( 72" quartersawn stave about 4
                            > inchs wide). I like the foot pressure method as it keeps both of my hands
                            > free to work the wood. The problem really shows itself when bringing the
                            > stave down from full size to a slender bow, when reducing the stave the
                            > bench really looses traction and if your bow slips at the wrong time and you
                            > cut into the grain, ruining the bow to nothing more then kindling. I am
                            > beginning to think what I need may not be a Wonder Bench but two or three
                            > benches that server the purpose of each stage in the bow making process..
                            > Thanks again for the help, I am going to take the page you sent on the
                            > bamboo fly rods and try to make it work for creating bamboo arrows.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Domingos
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                            > Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 11:08 AM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Are you looking for a way to mount the bow horizontally at bench height? If
                            > so the poppet system on this lathe may work for you. Note figure 8.
                            > http://www.greenwoo <http://www.greenwoodworking.com/evplathe.htm>
                            > dworking.com/evplathe.htm You wouldn't need the lathe specific stuff like
                            > the spring pole or the tool rest, and you'd have to fashion something to
                            > keep the bow from spinning when you are shaving it, maybe.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Or you could just make a shave horse ala: http://www.greenwoo
                            > <http://www.greenwoodworking.com/shorse.htm> dworking.com/shorse.htm I
                            > don't know the specific requirements of work a bowyer needs, so maybe the
                            > shave horse isn't ideal.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Other thoughts for bowyers that leap to mind is a sticking board like a sash
                            > maker uses for making windows, or the frame a fly fishing pole maker uses
                            > like these:
                            >
                            > http://www.wdynamic
                            > <http://www.wdynamic.com/galoots/4images/details.php?image_id=815&sessionid=
                            > d3db69d8340757a87faec5f95363cff6>
                            > .com/galoots/4images/details.php?image_id=815&sessionid=d3db69d8340757a87fae
                            > c5f95363cff6
                            >
                            > and
                            >
                            > http://www.flyangle
                            > <http://www.flyanglersonline.com/features/bamboo/part118.html>
                            > rsonline.com/features/bamboo/part118.html
                            >
                            > http://hipwader. <http://hipwader.com/2004/building-custom-cane-fly-rods/3/>
                            > com/2004/building-custom-cane-fly-rods/3/
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Again, my ignorance of bow making leaves me in the dark on how appropriate a
                            > holding method those are, but that's where my mind wanders when thinking of
                            > bow making.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                            > Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 10:46 AM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
                            >
                            > Thank you for the great reply CN. I will have some picks up on the list
                            > before long of the two I spoke of. I am interested also in producing a
                            > bowyers/ shaving bench. I made and used one design but it was awkward and
                            > the grip of the material (in my case a bow stave) allowed it to slip on
                            > enough occasions the bench eventually found itself dismantles and used on
                            > other less prestigious projects. What I would like is to find a bench design
                            > that would be used mainly for shaving bows but could be used for many other
                            > things, Easy to clamp and has a strong grip.any advise here?
                            >
                            > Domingos
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            >
                            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of C N Schwartz
                            > Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:47 PM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
                            >
                            > There was a shocking number of different types of cross sections for
                            > drawknives, each for a different application/profession. And preference, of
                            > course. And that's just one of the variables. Don't forget handle angle,
                            > length, blade width, etc. There were as many types of drawknives as there
                            > are circular saw blades today.
                            >
                            > The groove in the one you have is probably a way for guiding your sharpening
                            > stone to make the knife easier to sharpen. The curve is either an inshave
                            > (if it curves that way) or a scheme to make it easier to slice your wood by
                            > have a built in skew angle of attack (if it curves that way). I'm not sure
                            > from your description which way it curves.
                            >
                            > My advice, use the drawknives. Try bevel up and bevel down. Decide what
                            > works best for you in the various applications. I prefer an 8 inch Buck
                            > Bros drawknife for various spoke like things, but the control a small knife
                            > offers would be useless if I was trying to debark logs for a cabin. For
                            > that something big and honking is called for. And 8 inches gives me little
                            > chance for slicing action.
                            >
                            > -----Original Message-----
                            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of William A. Brown
                            > Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 8:10 AM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
                            >
                            > I have another question, this time on draw knives. I own 2 and both are
                            > similar but distinct differences are seen in the curvature of the blade
                            > between handles AND the curvature of the hollow grind of the blade itself.
                            > The more curved blade (handle to handle) also sports the curved hollow grind
                            > bevel while the straighter one has an almost flat hollow grind. Is this
                            > intentional or bad sharpening.
                            >
                            > Domingos
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            >
                            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of AEbsynth Byvordhr
                            > Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2006 12:28 AM
                            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                            > Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Saw this on ebay
                            >
                            > --- "William A. Brown" <bill@namesayers. <mailto:bill%40namesayers.com> com>
                            > wrote:
                            >
                            >> Thanks for the input. I am looking for a workbench
                            >> close to this but of an
                            >> earlier design. Any suggestions, I don't really need
                            >> plans just a drawing or
                            >> picture would be more then helpful.
                            >
                            > You can buy the clam ready-made from Leather Factory.
                            >
                            >
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