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food safe wood

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  • lambdakennels1@juno.com
    Is there a list somewhere of food safe wood? I know many of the exotics are toxic, but what about more common wood. Specifically, is aspen food safe? And
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 18, 2006
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      Is there a list somewhere of food safe wood?  I know many of the exotics are toxic, but what about more common wood.  Specifically, is aspen food safe?  And while I know this has been discussed before, how do you finish a food safe wood to keep it safe to use for food?

      Stephanie Lilburn
      aka Stephanie Smith, Ph.D
      Hunt County, Texas
      Owned by a Poodle and an Australian Cattle Dog
      K5AMK

    • Arthur Slaughter
      Most native hardwoods would be safe fro use, though some would impart off flavors. For my own woodenware , which sees constant use I use no finish at all. Warm
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 18, 2006
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        Most native hardwoods would be safe fro use, though some would impart off
        flavors. For my own woodenware , which sees constant use I use no finish at
        all. Warm water wash and dry if it looks thirsty I give it a wipe with
        walnut oil. In your area some soft hardwoods are available that make up
        quite nicely. Cottonwood and basswood are easily wortked and seem to hold up
        well to teh abuse I give my woodenware.
        THL Finnr
        >From: "lambdakennels1@..." <lambdakennels1@...>
        >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] food safe wood
        >Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 15:38:40 GMT
        >
        >Is there a list somewhere of food safe wood? I know many of the exotics
        >are toxic, but what about more common wood. Specifically, is aspen food
        >safe? And while I know this has been discussed before, how do you finish a
        >food safe wood to keep it safe to use for food?
        >
        >Stephanie Lilburn
        >aka Stephanie Smith, Ph.D
        >Hunt County, Texas
        >Owned by a Poodle and an Australian Cattle Dog
        >K5AMK
        >

        _________________________________________________________________
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      • Jared
        ... tannins, in oak especially, but also many others, since the highest levels of tannins are in the bark layers, thers probably higher tannin levels in your
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 18, 2006
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          --- possibly the most comun "toxin" in native hardwoods would be
          tannins, in oak especially, but also many others, since the highest
          levels of tannins are in the bark layers, thers probably higher tannin
          levels in your cup of tea than than a peice of wooden ware, since oak
          barrels, and chips are used very intentionally to flavor and stabalize
          wines and whiskey, they should be considered very "food safe" at any
          reasonable levels. Tannin levels exist in many other vegatative plants
          other then trees, some for human consumption, many primaraly for
          animal consumption. There is a massive list of plants that have been
          used thoughout history to tann hides, many of them you have probably
          eaten. Its the dosage that determines if its "toxic" or harmless.

          Black walnut to the best of my knowledge contains a few compounds
          having the effects of a sedative and that of a laxative, as grand as
          that sounds, consider what possible dosage you could get from any
          wooden bowl or cup, anyone working in the shop were the wood is turned
          into fine paricles on a lathe or sander, is subject to far higher
          levels of these compounds than you could possbly get. You would have
          to eat the entire bowl to equal the effectes of me inhaling sawdust
          for a few days. Literally,
          I would be more concered about what happens when you microwave a
          styrofaom cup, or breathe that "new car smell" (wich is petroleum
          distillate evaporatives from your carpet, vynil, paint, and
          plastics)than I would of anything made from any north american hardwood.
          Jared



          In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Arthur Slaughter"
          <finnmacart@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Most native hardwoods would be safe fro use, though some would
          impart off
          > flavors. For my own woodenware , which sees constant use I use no
          finish at
          > all. Warm water wash and dry if it looks thirsty I give it a wipe with
          > walnut oil. In your area some soft hardwoods are available that
          make up
          > quite nicely. Cottonwood and basswood are easily wortked and seem to
          hold up
          > well to teh abuse I give my woodenware.
          > THL Finnr
          > >From: "lambdakennels1@..." <lambdakennels1@...>
          > >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] food safe wood
          > >Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 15:38:40 GMT
          > >
          > >Is there a list somewhere of food safe wood? I know many of the
          exotics
          > >are toxic, but what about more common wood. Specifically, is aspen
          food
          > >safe? And while I know this has been discussed before, how do you
          finish a
          > >food safe wood to keep it safe to use for food?
          > >
          > >Stephanie Lilburn
          > >aka Stephanie Smith, Ph.D
          > >Hunt County, Texas
          > >Owned by a Poodle and an Australian Cattle Dog
          > >K5AMK
          > >
          >
          > _________________________________________________________________
          > Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's
          FREE!
          > http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/
          >
        • maf@gleichen.ca
          I m working on a cheese press in maple. I d like to make some cheese molds to go with it, but I m finding references to that they were made of wood but no
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2008
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            I'm working on a cheese press in maple. I'd like to make some cheese molds to go with it, but I'm finding references to that they were made of wood but no specific wood varieties. Does anyone have any good suggestions for a wood that will not impart flavours and will be easy to keep clean?
             
             
            Mark
          • Eric
            I ve read that clear grain (spar grade) spruce was often used for butter molds. I think that the presses or molds develop a patina from the fats in the cheese
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2008
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              I've read that clear grain (spar grade) spruce was often used for
              butter molds. I think that the presses or molds develop a patina from
              the fats in the cheese or milk and become more non-stick over time.

              Eirikr

              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, <maf@...> wrote:
              >
              > I'm working on a cheese press in maple. I'd like to make some cheese
              molds to go with it, but I'm finding references to that they were made
              of wood but no specific wood varieties. Does anyone have any good
              suggestions for a wood that will not impart flavours and will be easy
              to keep clean?
              >
              >
              > Mark
              >
            • leaking pen
              i would say a well scraped oak. this one seems oak to me, i could be wrong.
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 2, 2008
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                i would say a well scraped oak.

                this one seems oak to me, i could be wrong.
                http://www.cyberattic.com/stores/atapantiques/items/827071/item827071cyberattic.html

                this one says birch.
                http://www.saunalahti.fi/~marian1/gourmet/cheesefr.htm

                this site suggests maple
                http://fiascofarm.com/dairy/cheesepress.html

                it also suggests mineral oil.... id use grapeseed myself.

                also, you mostly just use a press, then wrap and age, right? so its
                not going to be in constant contact for transferring flavor over time.

                On Tue, Dec 2, 2008 at 4:42 PM, Eric <ewdysar@...> wrote:
                > I've read that clear grain (spar grade) spruce was often used for
                > butter molds. I think that the presses or molds develop a patina from
                > the fats in the cheese or milk and become more non-stick over time.
                >
                > Eirikr
                >
                > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, <maf@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> I'm working on a cheese press in maple. I'd like to make some cheese
                > molds to go with it, but I'm finding references to that they were made
                > of wood but no specific wood varieties. Does anyone have any good
                > suggestions for a wood that will not impart flavours and will be easy
                > to keep clean?
                >>
                >>
                >> Mark
                >>
                >
                >
              • Rebekah d'Avignon
                You might try doing a for Cheesmaking Supplies for ideas. I have done so in the past and found several good sources for such things, though their
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 2, 2008
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                  You might try doing a <search> for Cheesmaking Supplies for ideas. I have done so in the past and found several good sources for such things, though their molds run from plastic to stainless steel. Of course.....hard maple does come to mind, but it gets expensive.


                  maf@... wrote:
                  I'm working on a cheese press in maple. I'd like to make some cheese molds to go with it, but I'm finding references to that they were made of wood but no specific wood varieties. Does anyone have any good suggestions for a wood that will not impart flavours and will be easy to keep clean?
                   
                   
                  Mark
                  .




                  RdA
                  "I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for a few public offiials." George Mason
                  "Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom in Europe." Noah Webster

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