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Flywheel Pole Lathe.

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  • Ryan
    I was wondering if anyone can send me an illustrated how-to on making a flywheel pole lathe and instructions on finishing it, and using it properly. Also plz
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 14, 2006
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      I was wondering if anyone can send me an illustrated how-to on making a
      flywheel pole lathe and instructions on finishing it, and using it
      properly. Also plz keep all auotmated equipment out cause I want it to
      be as athentic as possible. If there are any websites besides those
      found in the links section plz e-mail them to me as well.

      Ryan
    • Johann Friedrich
      I might be confused here, but do you have an illustration showing one of these lathes that you speak of? I ve made spring pole lathe out of a 12 2x6, a
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 14, 2006
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        I might be confused here, but do you have an illustration showing one of
        these lathes that you speak of? I've made spring pole lathe out of a 12'
        2x6, a sawhorse, and some scrap wood, but there is no way that a flywheel
        could have been used in what I did. Flywheel's would be used for a
        continueous rotation lathe, and a springpole lathe occilates the rotation
        of the work piece.

        On Sat, 15 Jul 2006, Ryan wrote:

        > I was wondering if anyone can send me an illustrated how-to on making a
        > flywheel pole lathe and instructions on finishing it, and using it
        > properly. Also plz keep all auotmated equipment out cause I want it to
        > be as athentic as possible. If there are any websites besides those
        > found in the links section plz e-mail them to me as well.
        >
        > Ryan

        -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=[The Realm of Darkness]=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= O-
        Ken Bowley yahoo@...
        AKA: Lord Johann Friedrich http://www.trod.org
        -=-=-=-=[Per saltire sable and gules, in fess two rapiers Or]=-=-=-=-
      • Tom Rettie
        ... Ryan, Take a look here: http://www.his.com/tom/index.html Regards, Fin ... Tom Rettie Blood and Sawdust http://www.his.com/tom/index.html
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 15, 2006
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ryan" <the_lunar_child@...> wrote:

          > I was wondering if anyone can send me an illustrated how-to on making a
          > flywheel pole lathe and instructions on finishing it, and using it
          > properly. Also plz keep all auotmated equipment out cause I want it to
          > be as athentic as possible. If there are any websites besides those
          > found in the links section plz e-mail them to me as well.

          Ryan,

          Take a look here:

          http://www.his.com/tom/index.html

          Regards,

          Fin

          ---------------------------------
          Tom Rettie
          Blood and Sawdust
          http://www.his.com/tom/index.html
        • Ryan Tikkie
          Yes I do have an illustration on the flywheel pole lathe and I do want continious rotation like you said. Also would you send me a how to on making the
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 15, 2006
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            Yes I do have an illustration on the flywheel pole lathe and I do want continious rotation like you said.  Also would you send me a how to on making the "horse" as well?
             
            here is the link:


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          • Johann Friedrich
            Ahhh.. I see. You are refering to a flywheel treadle lathe. When I see pole lathe , I think of a spring pole lathe, which is quite different from what you
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 15, 2006
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              Ahhh.. I see. You are refering to a flywheel treadle lathe. When I see
              "pole lathe", I think of a spring pole lathe, which is quite different
              from what you are wanting.

              When I made my temporary spring pole lathe, I just used a normal modern
              sawhorse for the base. Nothing fancy, and nothing that I could really put
              together in a how-to. At some point I should really put together a
              slightly more permanent horse for turning, even if I do change what I'm
              using as a spring pole every time.

              On Sat, 15 Jul 2006, Ryan Tikkie wrote:

              > Yes I do have an illustration on the flywheel pole lathe and I do want
              > continious rotation like you said. Also would you send me a how to on
              > making the "horse" as well?
              >
              > here is the link:
              > http://www.his.com/~tom/sca/lathes2.html
            • bigfredlab
              I had the same question as you did. Take a look at this website http://www.manytracks.com/lathe/default.htm On this page, you can download a very good ebook
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                I had the same question as you did. Take a look at this website

                http://www.manytracks.com/lathe/default.htm

                On this page, you can download a very good ebook by Steve Schmeck with
                directions how to build a treadle lathe.

                Hope this helps . . .

                Fearghus


                --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Ryan" <the_lunar_child@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > I was wondering if anyone can send me an illustrated how-to on
                making a
                > flywheel pole lathe and instructions on finishing it, and using it
                > properly. Also plz keep all auotmated equipment out cause I want it
                to
                > be as athentic as possible. If there are any websites besides those
                > found in the links section plz e-mail them to me as well.
                >
                > Ryan
                >
              • Lewis Newby
                Hrmmm, interesting concept, a flywheel Pole Lathe. I would caution on this particular combination unless you have figured out a clutching mechanism that would
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                  Hrmmm, interesting concept, a flywheel Pole Lathe. I would caution on this particular combination unless you have figured out a clutching mechanism that would allow the stored energy in the flywheel to continue to turn the piece without damaging the rope on the pole. Without a clutch the friction build up on the rope for the pole would eventually lead to failure.

                  The idea of a flywheel is to store energy generated by whatever mechanism and the expend it by turning the object it is attached to. The pole in a pole lathe has a very similar function but does it in reverse. When you apply pressure on the treadle you put energy into turning the work piece and the extra energy goes into bowing the pole. When you release the pressure on the treadle the pole expends it's stored energy to return the wrk piece to it's original position (hopefully). So if you attach a pole to a flywheel, your downward stroke would store energy in the flywheel AND the pole and turn the piece as well but then the pole would have to return expending its energy in the opposite direction of the flywheel thus removing more energy from the wheel and since that additional energy would need to go somewhere it is turned into heat via friction between the two opposing forces and that heat would then begin to cause the damage.

                  I'm not saying it can't be done, it just needs to have some sort of clutch mechanism either on the wheel OR the rope from the pole.

                  I have done a lot of research on lathes in period and am on a crusade to find a period flywheel lathe used for wood turning. I have found great wheel lathes for bell turning and pewter work, I have found water powered lathes for the same thing but have only found one drawing to evidence a wood turning flywheel (continuous rotation) lathe and that is a single sketch by Da Vinchi and it illustrates a treadle lathe very similar to the plans shown in the link.

                  Farin


                  On Jul 17, 2006, at 11:43 AM, bigfredlab wrote:

                  I had the same question as you did. Take a look at this website

                  http://www.manytracks.com/lathe/default.htm

                  On this page, you can download a very good ebook by Steve Schmeck with
                  directions how to build a treadle lathe.

                  Hope this helps . . .


                • Eric
                  Kind of like an adjustable box wrench, both wrenches, but mutually exclusive. I m also interested in the earliest documentable flywheel lathe, but as a
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                    Kind of like an adjustable box wrench, both wrenches, but mutually
                    exclusive. I'm also interested in the earliest documentable
                    flywheel lathe, but as a Viking, I'm probably stuck with pole
                    lathes, not that it's a bad thing...

                    YIS,
                    Eirikr Mjoksiglandi
                    Barony of Angels, Caid

                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Johann Friedrich <yahoo@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Ahhh.. I see. You are refering to a flywheel treadle lathe. When
                    I see
                    > "pole lathe", I think of a spring pole lathe, which is quite
                    different
                    > from what you are wanting....
                    > On Sat, 15 Jul 2006, Ryan Tikkie wrote:
                    >
                    > > Yes I do have an illustration on the flywheel pole lathe and I
                    do want
                    > > continious rotation like you said. Also would you send me a how
                    to on
                    > > making the "horse" as well?
                    > >
                    > > here is the link:
                    > > http://www.his.com/~tom/sca/lathes2.html
                    >
                  • Lewis Newby
                    Heh good analogy. I think you may be stuck with the pole lathe if you want to stay true to the viking age. I haven t even found evidence of any continuous
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                      Heh good analogy. 

                      I think you may be stuck with the pole lathe if you want to stay true to the viking age. I haven't even found evidence of any continuous turning lathe prior to the early 1400's.  There are a variety of reciprocating lathes that were in use for thousands of years. Both early East Indians and the Egyptians had a type of upright bow lathe using a piece of wood with a string tied at it's endpoints both in a flexed and non-flexed manner but more often than not this required two people to operate. The overhead bow has been mentioned and uses a treadle for one person use but I have seen no drawings of one as of yet so that may have been purely modern speculation on a different method for making a more compact pole lathe. I have seen several modern variations on this though that are very useful just not sure on any accuracy. I know I saw one outside of Charles Oakley's encampment one year but can't remember who made it.

                      On Jul 17, 2006, at 1:01 PM, Eric wrote:

                      Kind of like an adjustable box wrench, both wrenches, but mutually
                      exclusive. I'm also interested in the earliest documentable
                      flywheel lathe, but as a Viking, I'm probably stuck with pole
                      lathes, not that it's a bad thing...

                      YIS,
                      Eirikr Mjoksiglandi
                      Barony of Angels, Caid

                      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Johann Friedrich <yahoo@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > Ahhh.. I see. You are refering to a flywheel treadle lathe. When
                      I see
                      > "pole lathe", I think of a spring pole lathe, which is quite
                      different
                      > from what you are wanting....
                      > On Sat, 15 Jul 2006, Ryan Tikkie wrote:
                      >
                      > > Yes I do have an illustration on the flywheel pole lathe and I
                      do want
                      > > continious rotation like you said. Also would you send me a how
                      to on
                      > > making the "horse" as well?
                      > >
                      > > here is the link:
                      > > http://www.his.com/~tom/sca/lathes2.html
                      >


                    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                      You do not need a clutch. Attach the spring pole rope to the crank on the wheel. Push on the treadle the crank goes down(turning the wheel), the weight of the
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                        You do not need a clutch. Attach the spring pole rope to the crank on the wheel.  Push on the treadle the crank goes down(turning the wheel), the weight of the flywheel carries it over center, then the spring pole pulls it up.
                         
                        I am not sure how efficient the whole thing would be.
                         
                        James Cunningham
                         I would caution on this particular combination unless you have figured out a clutching mechanism that would allow the stored energy in the flywheel to continue to turn the piece without damaging the rope on the pole. Without a clutch the friction build up on the rope for the pole would eventually lead to failure.

                        The idea of a flywheel is to store energy generated by whatever mechanism and the expend it by turning the object it is attached to. The pole in a pole lathe has a very similar function but does it in reverse. When you apply pressure on the treadle you put energy into turning the work piece and the extra energy goes into bowing the pole. When you release the pressure on the treadle the pole expends it's stored energy to return the wrk piece to it's original position (hopefully). So if you attach a pole to a flywheel, your downward stroke would store energy in the flywheel AND the pole and turn the piece as well but then the pole would have to return expending its energy in the opposite direction of the flywheel thus removing more energy from the wheel and since that additional energy would need to go somewhere it is turned into heat via friction between the two opposing forces and that heat would then begin to cause the damage.

                        I'm not saying it can't be done, it just needs to have some sort of clutch mechanism either on the wheel OR the rope from the pole.

                        I have done a lot of research on lathes in period and am on a crusade to find a period flywheel lathe used for wood turning. I have found great wheel lathes for bell turning and pewter work, I have found water powered lathes for the same thing but have only found one drawing to evidence a wood turning flywheel (continuous rotation) lathe and that is a single sketch by Da Vinchi and it illustrates a treadle lathe very similar to the plans shown in the link.

                        Farin


                        On Jul 17, 2006, at 11:43 AM, bigfredlab wrote:

                        I had the same question as you did. Take a look at this website

                        http://www.manytracks.com/lathe/default.htm

                        On this page, you can download a very good ebook by Steve Schmeck with
                        directions how to build a treadle lathe.

                        Hope this helps . . .


                      • Lewis Newby
                        I see your point James, hrmmm. I m not sure why you would take up that kind of space when the flywheel should carry itself around without help from an external
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 17, 2006
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                          I see your point James, hrmmm. I'm not sure why you would take up that kind of space when the flywheel should carry itself around without help from an external source like a pole. Granted it would be a dual energy source, your foot on one side and the pole on the other side and except to get the thing started I don't suspect you would lose a lot in energy but then again it would still take up a LOT of space.

                          Farin


                          On Jul 17, 2006, at 11:35 PM, James W. Pratt, Jr. wrote:


                          You do not need a clutch. Attach the spring pole rope to the crank on the wheel.  Push on the treadle the crank goes down(turning the wheel), the weight of the flywheel carries it over center, then the spring pole pulls it up.
                           
                          I am not sure how efficient the whole thing would be.
                           
                          James Cunningham
                           I would caution on this particular combination unless you have figured out a clutching mechanism that would allow the stored energy in the flywheel to continue to turn the piece without damaging the rope on the pole. Without a clutch the friction build up on the rope for the pole would eventually lead to failure.

                          The idea of a flywheel is to store energy generated by whatever mechanism and the expend it by turning the object it is attached to. The pole in a pole lathe has a very similar function but does it in reverse. When you apply pressure on the treadle you put energy into turning the work piece and the extra energy goes into bowing the pole. When you release the pressure on the treadle the pole expends it's stored energy to return the wrk piece to it's original position (hopefully). So if you attach a pole to a flywheel, your downward stroke would store energy in the flywheel AND the pole and turn the piece as well but then the pole would have to return expending its energy in the opposite direction of the flywheel thus removing more energy from the wheel and since that additional energy would need to go somewhere it is turned into heat via friction between the two opposing forces and that heat would then begin to cause the damage.

                          I'm not saying it can't be done, it just needs to have some sort of clutch mechanism either on the wheel OR the rope from the pole.

                          I have done a lot of research on lathes in period and am on a crusade to find a period flywheel lathe used for wood turning. I have found great wheel lathes for bell turning and pewter work, I have found water powered lathes for the same thing but have only found one drawing to evidence a wood turning flywheel (continuous rotation) lathe and that is a single sketch by Da Vinchi and it illustrates a treadle lathe very similar to the plans shown in the link.

                          Farin


                          On Jul 17, 2006, at 11:43 AM, bigfredlab wrote:

                          I had the same question as you did. Take a look at this website

                          http://www.manytracks.com/lathe/default.htm

                          On this page, you can download a very good ebook by Steve Schmeck with
                          directions how to build a treadle lathe.

                          Hope this helps . . .




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