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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Chemically Blackening

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  • Arthur Slaughter
    The best way I have found to safely darken ferrous metals is as stated above. Get it hot, paint on linseed oil, and cook the oil in either on a forge or a
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 10, 2006
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      The best way I have found to safely darken ferrous metals is as stated
      above. Get it hot, paint on linseed oil, and cook the oil in either on a
      forge or a hotplate. As also has been stated DO NOT burn off zinc coatings.
      Even at the present high prices steel is cheap compared to a funeral.
      THL Finnr
      5th Generation Wisconsin bog hopper

      >From: "Geffrei Maudeleyne" <Geffrei@...>
      >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      >Subject: RE: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Chemically Blackening
      >Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 14:50:56 -0400
      >
      >That is essentially one good way that I have used to "season" cast iron
      >skillets. I would not do it, personally, with any other metal or coating
      >though. Shortening or animal grease drippings work but it will smoke and
      >smell. If done correctly cornbread will never stick to the pan.
      >Geffrei 24th generation hill-billy

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    • James Winkler
      I haven t played with the blackening metal thing myself... but watched a blacksmith blacken forged iron by BRUSHING ON wax or paraffin while the metal was
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 10, 2006
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        I haven't played with the blackening metal thing myself... but watched a blacksmith blacken forged iron by BRUSHING ON wax or paraffin while the metal was still glowing from forge.  (The wax stuff was in a bucket near the forge...   well, near enough to be melted... NOT near enough to suddenly flash into flames...)
         
        I would repeat... he BRUSHED ON THE WAX...  I can imagine the conflagration if one dipped a yellow hot iron into a bucket of paraffin...  again... no real personal experience... but the ol' slightly still functioning sense of self preservation sez' this probably would be a bad thing.
         
        Don't know if anybody else has seen or practiced this... but it made a nice black surface on the metal... and it involves fire... which is a bonus. 
         
        Probably best done OUTDOORS with a fire extinguisher and/or bucket of water handy...  having a phone to call 911 if things go really wrong probably wouldn't be a bad idea either...
         
        Chas.
      • Haraldr Bassi (yahoogroups)
        Last Monday I was at a place called Old Sturbridge Village, an 1830 s recreation site near Boston, MA and had an opportunity to make a drive hook on the
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 10, 2006
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          Last Monday I was at a place called Old Sturbridge Village, an 1830's
          recreation site near Boston, MA and had an opportunity to make a drive
          hook on the fordge. When we were all done forming it, we quenched it in a
          wooden bucket of boiled linseed oil. It was after the last forming was
          done so the metal was no longer glowing. It seemed to work nicely to
          blacken the piece. Note that we had to drop the piece and used a special
          pair of tongs to pull the piece out of the gooey bucket and wiped the
          excess off with a rag.

          Does anyone have any info on how they solved this in the Viking age? I
          know they had linseed oil and used it for finishing lots of things and it
          isn't a stretch for applying it to hot metal.

          Haraldr

          On Mon, July 10, 2006 17:03, James Winkler said:
          > I haven't played with the blackening metal thing myself... but watched a
          > blacksmith blacken forged iron by BRUSHING ON wax or paraffin while the
          > metal was still glowing from forge. (The wax stuff was in a bucket near
          > the forge... well, near enough to be melted... NOT near enough to
          > suddenly flash into flames...)
          >
          > I would repeat... he BRUSHED ON THE WAX... I can imagine the
          > conflagration if one dipped a yellow hot iron into a bucket of paraffin...
          > again... no real personal experience... but the ol' slightly still
          > functioning sense of self preservation sez' this probably would be a bad
          > thing.
          >
          > Don't know if anybody else has seen or practiced this... but it made a
          > nice black surface on the metal... and it involves fire... which is a
          > bonus.
          >
          > Probably best done OUTDOORS with a fire extinguisher and/or bucket of
          > water handy... having a phone to call 911 if things go really wrong
          > probably wouldn't be a bad idea either...
          >
          > Chas.


          --
          Dave Calafrancesco

          ... They got the library at Alexandria, they aren't getting mine!
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