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Danger Will Robinson......

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  • Avery Austringer
    ... It s pretty much been explained, but.... Concrete is hydrated lime. The waters of hydration are held in place relatively weakly (But taken as a whole,
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 1, 2006
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      >> or that bronze plus concrete equals an
      >> explosion on par with a fragmentation grenade,
      >
      >Mind shedding a little more light on that one?

      It's pretty much been explained, but....

      Concrete is hydrated lime. The "waters of hydration" are held in place
      relatively weakly (But taken as a whole, there is a mess of binding
      going on.) When you dump molten bronze onto concrete (or anything else
      that's really hot) these waters of hydration let go and turn into
      steam. Steam has 1200 times the volume of liquid water (ignoring
      temperature changes - that might contribute another 4 or 5 fold
      increase). While that is happening the bronze, at least the part that
      dumped all it's heat into the concrete to make that steam, is
      solidifying, so that it can withstand more pressure before it lets go.
      Then it lets go....

      Pour bronze over dry sand. A few inches of dry sand over concrete is
      probably enough for the volumes that most of us are likely to deal
      with.

      Now let me tell you about my dad's industrial accident! Picture a
      bucket of molten iron. This particular bucket held maybe 40 tons of
      iron. Now, imagine the handle (well, one of the lugs the crane hooks
      onto) breaking and that bucket getting dumped into concrete lined hole
      in the ground. Amazingly, no one was killed - most of the blast went
      up. But there were plenty of burns to go around.

      My dad had been a ways back and, so, helped them load the obviously
      injured into an ambulance. He knew he had some injuries, but didn't
      think he was that bad off. Then he went to wash himself off with some
      cold water. Then his hair fell off. Pretty much in one piece as he
      tells it.

      Later the adrenaline wore off.

      Another safety tip - wear natural fibers. His only obvious scaring is
      a band around either wrist where the winter coat he was wearing met
      skin.

      Avery
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