Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Handbook of Wood Engraving

Expand Messages
  • rmhowe
    Recently bought the following off of eBay. As they are very old and probably scarce you might have to interlibrary loan one. But for making blockprints this
    Message 1 of 2 , May 15, 2006
      Recently bought the following off of eBay. As they are very old
      and probably scarce you might have to interlibrary loan one.
      But for making blockprints this one probably comes as close to
      the medieval methods as any I have ever seen. Dover has/had a
      pair of books on the history of engraving. They do sell
      the Medieval Life Illustrations book that is mostly block prints
      from Nuremburg.

      Emerson, William: Handbook of Wood Engraving; [1881] 1884 edition
      Hardcover, 4.25 X 6 inches in size, 96 pages. Great illustrations!
      Begins with the early medieval forms, covers up to the 19th C
      printing blocks used for newspapers, books and advertising.
      Some of the engravings are so amazing they look very much like
      copper plate engraving. I would have mistaken them as such if
      the author hadn't shown them in the book. It is highly detailed
      with lessons on shading by lining, etc.

      Shows all tools, their sharpening profiles, the setup with an eye
      loupe on stand and raised platform for people doing this to use.
      The tools are by and large specially sharpened gravers as you
      would use for metals, only with a much sharper profile and some
      small similarly handled wood chisels. As this was written in an
      age without electric light the methods for focusing more light
      from lamps are shown.

      Begins with a boxwood log and shows the process of making the
      blocks from it. Shows how to piece up larger boxwood blocks by
      doweling or bolting them together in the 19th C method
      [possibly earlier]. There is a page with a number of differently
      colored blocks made up to multiply print a pattern.

      For it's size a very inclusive little book. Better than most
      of the later 'Art' type block printing books by far. The details
      of the earlier block print makers are far more detailed than
      any of the twentieth century books on wood block or linoleum
      block printing I have seen.

      Stefan, I would add this to the previous bibliography I think
      you have in the Florilegium.org I wrote on wooden block printing.
      It is well worth looking up.

      Magnus, OL / R.M. Howe
      Great Barony of Windmasters' Hill, the Manx, Great Dark Horde
    • kjworz@comcast.net
      I googled it and found pdf s of the book online. http://www.shipbrook.com/jeff/bookshelf/details.html?bookid=1 -- -Chris Schwartz Silver Spring, MD ... From:
      Message 2 of 2 , May 16, 2006
        I googled it and found pdf's of the book online.

        http://www.shipbrook.com/jeff/bookshelf/details.html?bookid=1


        --
        -Chris Schwartz
        Silver Spring, MD

        -------------- Original message ----------------------
        From: rmhowe <MMagnusM@...>
        > Recently bought the following off of eBay. As they are very old
        > and probably scarce you might have to interlibrary loan one.
        > But for making blockprints this one probably comes as close to
        > the medieval methods as any I have ever seen. Dover has/had a
        > pair of books on the history of engraving. They do sell
        > the Medieval Life Illustrations book that is mostly block prints
        > from Nuremburg.
        >
        > Emerson, William: Handbook of Wood Engraving; [1881] 1884 edition
        > Hardcover, 4.25 X 6 inches in size, 96 pages. Great illustrations!
        > Begins with the early medieval forms, covers up to the 19th C
        > printing blocks used for newspapers, books and advertising.
        > Some of the engravings are so amazing they look very much like
        > copper plate engraving. I would have mistaken them as such if
        > the author hadn't shown them in the book. It is highly detailed
        > with lessons on shading by lining, etc.
        >
        > Shows all tools, their sharpening profiles, the setup with an eye
        > loupe on stand and raised platform for people doing this to use.
        > The tools are by and large specially sharpened gravers as you
        > would use for metals, only with a much sharper profile and some
        > small similarly handled wood chisels. As this was written in an
        > age without electric light the methods for focusing more light
        > from lamps are shown.
        >
        > Begins with a boxwood log and shows the process of making the
        > blocks from it. Shows how to piece up larger boxwood blocks by
        > doweling or bolting them together in the 19th C method
        > [possibly earlier]. There is a page with a number of differently
        > colored blocks made up to multiply print a pattern.
        >
        > For it's size a very inclusive little book. Better than most
        > of the later 'Art' type block printing books by far. The details
        > of the earlier block print makers are far more detailed than
        > any of the twentieth century books on wood block or linoleum
        > block printing I have seen.
        >
        > Stefan, I would add this to the previous bibliography I think
        > you have in the Florilegium.org I wrote on wooden block printing.
        > It is well worth looking up.
        >
        > Magnus, OL / R.M. Howe
        > Great Barony of Windmasters' Hill, the Manx, Great Dark Horde
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.