Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Wooden drinking vessels

Expand Messages
  • Ralph Lindberg
    ... Gillian, I do a far amount of turning, I also have several nice books the touch or cover period turning(the York book already listed, the book on the Mary
    Message 1 of 51 , May 10, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
      <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Greetings to the list!
      >
      > Does anyone here know of any documentation for wooden drinking
      > vessels, shaped like modern glass tumblers (tall and narrow, same
      > dimentions top to bottom) in which the bottom is a separate piece?
      >

      Gillian, I do a far amount of turning, I also have several nice books
      the touch or cover period turning(the York book already listed, the
      book on the Mary Rose finds, Robin Woods book on bowls, etc). You
      almost never find a turned drinking vessel that is taller then it is
      wide (nice chart in the York book on this). There is a very good
      reason for this. Even when I look at the late period stuff, most is
      not taller then it is wide.

      The reason for this is, productivity. I can be more productive turning
      out drinking bowls then I can doing tall "tumblers". With modern tools
      I can probably get three for four bowls done in the time it would take
      me to do a tall mug/goblet/etc. I suspect, from my reading on the hook
      chisels used in period, the ratio would be even higher.

      It just takes a bloody long time to hollow out a narrow, deep vessel.
      More then it takes to turn a shallower vessel. I suspect this is one
      of the reasons that most wooden drinking vessels are wider then they
      are tall.

      As an example, it took me longer to turn the tall goblet I made for HE
      Bridget, then it did for the four bowls I made for my wife's elevation
      ceremony.

      Now this ratio is not true of the coopered/stave built mugs. There it
      is common for the vessel to be taller then it is wide.

      TTFN
      Ralg
      AnTir
    • msgilliandurham
      ... ... Great, thanks -- is this usage also conjectural, or can I tell my students we know at least *somebody* did it this way, because
      Message 51 of 51 , Jun 21, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Rettie" <tom@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
        <msgilliandurham@>
        > wrote:
        >
        > > The reason I asked it that I'd always visialized leather hinges as
        > > being two long straps, like metal hinges.
        >
        > Here's a pictures that illustrates the other approach I was trying
        to describe:
        >
        > http://www.his.com/~tom/Images/leatherhinge.jpg
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Tom R.
        > Blood and Sawdust
        > http://www.his.com/tom/index.html

        Great, thanks -- is this usage also conjectural, or can I tell my
        students "we know at least *somebody* did it this way, because
        there's this existing chest in this castle...."?

        Thanks for all your assistance --
        Gillian Durham
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.