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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Wooden drinking vessels

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  • Arthur Slaughter
    Can t say I have ever run across anything of that type in my research. Untill fairly late in period, mazers seem to have been quite common. What amounts to a
    Message 1 of 51 , May 10 6:35 PM
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      Can't say I have ever run across anything of that type in my research.
      Untill fairly late in period, mazers seem to have been quite common. What
      amounts to a drinking bowl.
      THL Finnr


      >From: "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@...>
      >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      >To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Wooden drinking vessels
      >Date: Thu, 11 May 2006 00:24:54 -0000
      >
      >
      >Greetings to the list!
      >
      >Does anyone here know of any documentation for wooden drinking
      >vessels, shaped like modern glass tumblers (tall and narrow, same
      >dimentions top to bottom) in which the bottom is a separate piece?
      >
      >I realize these would usually have been nade on a lathe, using a
      >chisel to carve out the inside, and the bottom would have been
      >integral.
      >
      >I've seen horn vessels made that way, just wondering about wood.
      >
      >Thanks, Gillian Durham
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

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    • msgilliandurham
      ... ... Great, thanks -- is this usage also conjectural, or can I tell my students we know at least *somebody* did it this way, because
      Message 51 of 51 , Jun 21, 2006
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        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Rettie" <tom@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
        <msgilliandurham@>
        > wrote:
        >
        > > The reason I asked it that I'd always visialized leather hinges as
        > > being two long straps, like metal hinges.
        >
        > Here's a pictures that illustrates the other approach I was trying
        to describe:
        >
        > http://www.his.com/~tom/Images/leatherhinge.jpg
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Tom R.
        > Blood and Sawdust
        > http://www.his.com/tom/index.html

        Great, thanks -- is this usage also conjectural, or can I tell my
        students "we know at least *somebody* did it this way, because
        there's this existing chest in this castle...."?

        Thanks for all your assistance --
        Gillian Durham
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