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Re: Lathework question

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  • Ralph Lindberg
    ... I have (in the last 30 seconds) seen documentation on similar needle cases. They are shown on Before the Mast: Life and Death aboard the Mary Rose So
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 4, 2006
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      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "msgilliandurham"
      <msgilliandurham@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Greetings to the list!
      >
      > If those of you who do turning work could address the following query,
      > I'd be ever so grateful --
      >
      > Is the following object something which could have been created in the
      > 2nd half of the 16th Century in Northern Europe?
      >
      I have (in the last 30 seconds) seen documentation on similar needle
      cases. They are shown on "Before the Mast: Life and Death aboard the
      Mary Rose" So that purty much matches your time period.
      The major difference is, the plugs are all internal, not external.
      Which makes sense, since period turning technics would make an
      external tight-fit plugs harder to make then interior plugs.
      If I was making a case strictly "between centers" (ie period
      method). I would have to just turn the exterior, then part the case
      off the rough and then drill out the storage hole for the needles.
      The tough part would be the lid/plug. If it was internal (like the
      examples in the book), all I would have to do shape the plug (probably
      with a knife) until it fit tight.
      If I was making an external-fit lid, I would have either have to
      have turned the case very precisely, to match the hole I would drill
      in the lid. Or, use a small hook-knife to make the opening in the lid
      match the diameter of the case. Either operation would be more time
      consuming then using an interior plug.

      One interesting thing was that a couple of the "needle cases" were
      also bobbins. That is they are bobbins that were drilled out to store
      the needles inside.

      Hope this was some help
      Ralg (who's new lathe is waiting to clear customs)
      AnTir
    • Beth and Bob Matney
      The short answer is: yes. Turned wood boxes such as your example are in existence (at least from Roman times). Detailed information on them (and how to
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 5, 2006
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        The short answer is: yes. Turned wood boxes such as your example are in
        existence (at least from Roman times). Detailed information on them (and
        how to recreate using period tools) is in the book.

        Roman Domestic Wood by Paola Pugsley 209p, b/w illus, tbs (BAR S1118,
        2003) ISBN 1841713279

        Small turned boxes (suitable to hold needles) with caps are shown.. though
        one needle-case is of the more complex Vindolanda type with an internal
        shank to hold thread. These are in contrast with the simpler style of the
        presumed needle-case shown in Before the Mast (p328).

        Beth of Walnutvale (mka Beth Matney)

        >Date: Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:50:52 -0000
        >From: "msgilliandurham" <msgilliandurham@...>
        >
        >Greetings to the list!
        >
        >If those of you who do turning work could address the following query,
        >I'd be ever so grateful --
        >
        >Is the following object something which could have been created in the
        >2nd half of the 16th Century in Northern Europe?
        >
        >http://jas-townsend.com/product_info.php?products_id=348
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