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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Painted wood

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    ... to be more clear, I think it should be.... If they applyied any finish to the wood they usually painted it. Sometimes they used no finish at all. Baron
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 1, 2006
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      --- Tatjana <tatjanatiger@...> wrote:

      > In another thread, someone mentioned that wood was
      > mostly painted in period.
      > (I know I am paraphrasing.)
      >
      to be more clear, I think it should be....

      If they applyied any finish to the wood they usually
      painted it. Sometimes they used no finish at all.


      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '

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    • Iain Odlin
      ... This works great for positive evidence, true, but have a care not to take this documntation source too far from its area of usefulness either. Yes, you get
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 1, 2006
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        "Bill McNutt" <mcnutt@...> wrote:

        >The only documentation you can have a really, really high confidence in is
        >paperwork. Inventories, invoices, shop manuals and the like. A listing of
        >a "large coffer, painted green with a blue vine pattern" is documentation
        >GOLD. If you can find it. And if you are willing to assume it's not a
        >18th
        >century counterfeit created to force a change in someone's title or lands.

        This works great for positive evidence, true, but have a care not to
        take this documntation source too far from its area of usefulness either.

        Yes, you get rock-solid documentation that there once existed a 'green
        chest w/ the passion of our lord paynted thereupon,' but some of
        these inventories ended with an entry that read "And the rest of the
        items, none of note" and therefore cannot be trusted to also mention
        the unadorned, nearly worn out three-legged stool sitting in the corner
        next to Father's deathbed.

        [It's the same today, of course. "Man Kills Six With Car" is FAR more
        likely as a newspaper headline than "Man Drives To Store Without
        Incident," regardless -- if not because -- of which is more usual in
        reality.]

        Obviously, they aren't all like this. Several royal household rolls are
        obsessively complete, for example. But you can no more accept an
        average medieval inventory as "evidence of absence" -- or indeed
        relative frequency -- than you can anything else.

        -Iain of Malagentia
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