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The Woodworking Channel

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  • Ralph Lindberg
    If you haven t heard, there is a broad-cast web-site that shows woodworking shows 24-7. While a dial-up connection works, DSL/Cable/or other broad-band
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 31, 2006
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      If you haven't heard, there is a broad-cast web-site that shows
      woodworking shows 24-7.

      While a dial-up connection works, DSL/Cable/or other broad-band
      connection is better.

      See http://thewoodworkingchannel.com/

      TTFN
      Ralg
      AnTir
    • James Winkler
      .. just saw a little Mythbusters episode on sharks... they tested the sharkskin as sandpaper thing... turns out dried shark skin (forgot the species)... has
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 1, 2006
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        ... just saw a little Mythbusters episode on sharks... they tested the "sharkskin as sandpaper" thing...  turns out dried shark skin (forgot the species)... has an abrasion quality somewhere between 400 and 600 grit sandpaper.   They also made a sharkskin pad for a random orbit sander...  seemed rather impressed with the results.
         
        Now...  the one question they DIDN'T answer is where a guy in the Black Forest might have laid his hands on a shark...  ;-[)  (... or, asked a bit more profoundly...  "OK... they *could have*... but DID they and, if so, how common was it???")
         
        Chas.
      • Arthur Slaughter
        No idea about shark skin. I do know that common horsetail is a pretty good abrasive, due to teh latge amounts of silica it atkes up. THL Finnr ...
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 1, 2006
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          No idea about shark skin. I do know that common horsetail is a pretty good
          abrasive, due to teh latge amounts of silica it atkes up.
          THL Finnr


          >From: "James Winkler" <jrwinkler@...>
          >Reply-To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] The Woodworking Channel
          >Date: Sat, 1 Apr 2006 11:25:19 -0600
          >
          >.. just saw a little Mythbusters episode on sharks... they tested the
          >"sharkskin as sandpaper" thing... turns out dried shark skin (forgot the
          >species)... has an abrasion quality somewhere between 400 and 600 grit
          >sandpaper. They also made a sharkskin pad for a random orbit sander...
          >seemed rather impressed with the results.
          >
          >Now... the one question they DIDN'T answer is where a guy in the Black
          >Forest might have laid his hands on a shark... ;-[) (... or, asked a bit
          >more profoundly... "OK... they *could have*... but DID they and, if so,
          >how common was it???")
          >
          >Chas.

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        • Bruce S. R. Lee
          I can get it back to the early 19th Century - sharkskin sandpaper was a minor industry in Colonial Australia, at least at Eden in NSW. The shore whalers used
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 2, 2006
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            I can get it back to the early 19th Century - sharkskin sandpaper was
            a minor industry in Colonial Australia, at least at Eden in NSW. The
            shore whalers used to hunt sharks for their skin in between the
            periodic whale migrations. The tool used looks like a 'Koran stand'
            with a short chisel shaped blade hammered into one leaf - the blade
            was used to start the cut under the skin, then the flap was gripped
            between the jaws at the other end & ripped off in a sheet. It was
            then scraped & dried before being sent off to market in Sydney.

            The other major use of shark skin was 'shagreen' - originally donkey
            skin, the name became attached to shark or ray skin used for wrapping
            sword handles - which gets it back to the 1600's in places like
            Poland where it seems to have been used on sabre handles.

            As to where a Black Forest woodworker would get his supply, probably
            from the same merchant who sold him a barrel of salt cod.

            regards
            Brusi of Orkney
            Rowany/Lochac
            Sydney/Australia


            At 03:25 AM 2/04/2006, you wrote:
            >... just saw a little Mythbusters episode on sharks... they tested
            >the "sharkskin as sandpaper" thing... turns out dried shark skin
            >(forgot the species)... has an abrasion quality somewhere between
            >400 and 600 grit sandpaper. They also made a sharkskin pad for a
            >random orbit sander... seemed rather impressed with the results.
            >
            >Now... the one question they DIDN'T answer is where a guy in the
            >Black Forest might have laid his hands on a shark... ;-[) (... or,
            >asked a bit more profoundly... "OK... they *could have*... but DID
            >they and, if so, how common was it???")
            >
            >Chas.
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