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Cooper top

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  • Christina
    Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me out. One of my class mates in Woodshop is making a chest with a rounded top and so far
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 27, 2006
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      Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me out. One
      of my class mates in Woodshop is making a chest with a rounded top and so
      far no one has found useful directions on how exactly to do that. Him and the
      teacher have been calling it a "coopered top". Does any one here have any
      experience with this type of thing or know where we could get more
      information on how to do it?
      Thanks in advance for any help.

      Slaine O'Duinne
      House of Lost Soles
      Caid
    • Siegfried
      Well, a coopered top , means build like a barrel. So lots of slats, with appropriately measured angles cut onto their edges, all glued together to form a
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 28, 2006
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        Well, a 'coopered top', means build like a barrel.   So lots of slats, with appropriately measured angles cut onto their edges, all glued together to form a 'curve'.   Which can then be planed/sanded down to 'smooth', or left kinda polygonal.

        The other way of doing a round top (and probably not period) would be laminations.  Cut lots and lots of very thin slices of wood, and laminate them together in the bend shape.

        Siegfried


        On 2/27/06, Christina <selkie_bard@...> wrote:
        Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me out. One
        of my class mates in Woodshop is making a chest with a rounded top and so
        far no one has found useful directions on how exactly to do that. Him and the
        teacher have been calling it a "coopered top".  Does any one here have any
        experience with this type of thing or know where we could get more
        information on how to do it?
                                                      Thanks in advance for any help.

            Slaine O'Duinne
          House of Lost Soles
                    Caid





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      • awench1@cox.net
        I just read an article on this type of top. When I get home tonight, I will try to find it. Barbara
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 28, 2006
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          I just read an article on this type of top. When I get home tonight, I will try to find it.

          Barbara
          >
          > From: Siegfried <SiegfriedFaust@...>
          > Date: 2006/02/28 Tue AM 09:17:28 EST
          > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Cooper top
          >
          > Well, a 'coopered top', means build like a barrel. So lots of slats, with
          > appropriately measured angles cut onto their edges, all glued together to
          > form a 'curve'. Which can then be planed/sanded down to 'smooth', or left
          > kinda polygonal.
          >
          > The other way of doing a round top (and probably not period) would be
          > laminations. Cut lots and lots of very thin slices of wood, and laminate
          > them together in the bend shape.
          >
          > Siegfried
          >
        • Hall, Hayward
          Fine Woodworking magazine has an article on making one of these. I believe it is 17th century. The issue is FINE WOODWORKING #56 Jan-Feb 1986 pg. 67. You
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 28, 2006
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            Fine Woodworking magazine has an article on making one of these.  I believe it is 17th century.  The issue is FINE WOODWORKING #56 Jan-Feb 1986 pg. 67.  You can most likely get a photocopy of the article through interlibrary loan.  It's on my list of things to build one day.
             
            Guillaume


            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of awench1@...
            Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 9:15 AM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Re: [MedievalSawdust] Cooper top

            I just read an article on this type of top.  When I get home tonight, I will try to find it.

            Barbara
            >
            > From: Siegfried
            <SiegfriedFaust@...>
            > Date: 2006/02/28 Tue AM 09:17:28
            EST
            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re:
            [MedievalSawdust] Cooper top
            >
            > Well, a 'coopered top', means
            build like a barrel.   So lots of slats, with
            > appropriately
            measured angles cut onto their edges, all glued together to
            > form a
            'curve'.   Which can then be planed/sanded down to 'smooth', or left
            > kinda polygonal.
            >
            > The other way of doing a round
            top (and probably not period) would be
            > laminations.  Cut lots and
            lots of very thin slices of wood, and laminate
            > them together in the bend
            shape.
            >
            > Siegfried
            >


          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
            Yes I did. A cedar chest with a coopered top. I had a bunch of bowed boards which made it work better than strait boards. James Cunningham ... From:
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 28, 2006
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              Yes I did. A cedar chest with a coopered top. I had a bunch of bowed boards
              which made it work better than strait boards.

              James Cunningham


              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Christina" <selkie_bard@...>
              To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, February 27, 2006 11:51 PM
              Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Cooper top


              > Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me
              out. One
              > of my class mates in Woodshop is making a chest with a rounded top and so
              > far no one has found useful directions on how exactly to do that. Him and
              the
              > teacher have been calling it a "coopered top". Does any one here have any
              > experience with this type of thing or know where we could get more
              > information on how to do it?
              > Thanks in advance for any
              help.
              >
              > Slaine O'Duinne
              > House of Lost Soles
              > Caid
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • AlbionWood
              ... Welcome, Christina. I make small coopered-topped coffers; you can see a couple of early efforts here: http://www.albionworks.net/chests.html The first
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 28, 2006
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                Christina wrote:
                > Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me out. One
                > of my class mates in Woodshop is making a chest with a rounded top and so
                > far no one has found useful directions on how exactly to do that. Him and the
                > teacher have been calling it a "coopered top". Does any one here have any
                > experience with this type of thing or know where we could get more
                > information on how to do it?
                >
                Welcome, Christina.

                I make small coopered-topped coffers; you can see a couple of early
                efforts here:
                http://www.albionworks.net/chests.html

                The first thing to do is figure out the number and width of the strips,
                then calculate the angle to rip all the strips. Estimate the outside
                width of the finished top; say you want a coffer 8 inches wide. That's
                the outside diameter of the half-circle formed by the top; the
                circumferential distance would be pi*diameter/2, or 12. 57 inches,
                approximately 12+9/16 inches. Let's say you want to do this with 8
                strips; each one will be (12/57/8)= 1+9/16 inches wide. The angle of
                the edges will be 180/8 = 22.5 degrees (off vertical). [More strips
                will make a smoother top. 10 or 12 works pretty well. I think I use 11.]

                So, you set your table saw to 22.5 degrees and set the fence to 1+9/16
                inches, and rip 8 strips.

                Now comes the hard part: Assembly and clamping. What I do is make a
                jig. Take some 3/4" MDF or plywood, cut into squares about 10 inches on
                a side. Stack these up, clamped together with masking tape, and bandsaw
                out a half-circle 8 inches across, centered on one edge. Cut another
                piece of MDF or plywood the same width and as long as the box you are
                making (say, 10" x 16"). Stand the cutout pieces on this base plate,
                one at each end and the others evenly spaced, and glue+screw them to the
                base plate. Cut another piece 10+3/4" wide x 16" long and glue+screw
                this to one side, so that the top edge is flush with the top edge of the
                cutout pieces. Cut another piece 10"x16" and glue+screw it to the other
                side, so that the bottom edge is flush with the bottom of the box and
                the top edge is 3/4" below the top of the cutouts. You should have a
                3-sided box with the cutouts facing the opening. Now cut a strip of MDF
                or plywood about 2+1/2" wide and 16" long, and glue+screw this to one
                top edge of the box jig; the outside edge should be flush with the
                outside of the box, the inside edge of this strip should project about
                3/4" over the cutouts. This strip needs to be very firmly attached, as
                the clamping force will act against it. Let the glue cure.

                Lay the strips into the cutouts. They should exactly fit, making a
                semicircle. Make sure everything fits and there are no gaps in the
                joints. Take the strips back out, and put something non-stick onto the
                parts of the jig that contact the strips (I use strips of PTFE (Teflon)
                tape, but wax might work). Spread glue on the edges of the strips, and
                working quickly, lay them back into pace in the jig. Now you're about
                to find out the whole purpose of the jig: it's a way of clamping the
                assembly together while the glue dries. It's a little hard to describe
                and I don't have any photos; basically you clamp across one side of the
                jig, one clamp face on the exposed edge of the last strip and the other
                on the base plate of the jig. As you tighten the clamps, the force is
                distributed around the semicircle of strips, which are held in place by
                the overhanging lip on the other side of the jig.

                Once the glue has dried, unclamp and pull the top out. If you didn't
                get a non-stick surface on the jig, you will now regret it, because the
                top will be glued to the jig. Smooth the outside of the curve with a
                belt sander, then finish sand or scrape. Trying to smooth the inside
                can be an exercise in frustration. I use hollowing planes, but if I
                didn't have those I don't know what I would do. Scrape out the excess
                glue and leave the inside faceted, probably, or better yet - line it
                with fabric.

                The same basic procedure will work for less than a half-circle, or even
                a non-circular curve, but you have to figure out the geometry.


                Hope that helps. Next time I do one of these I will take some photos of
                the process.

                Cheers,
                Colin
              • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                I wish my early efforts on anything looked have as good!! James the Jealous Cunningham
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 1, 2006
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                  I wish my early efforts on anything looked have as good!!

                  James the Jealous Cunningham
                  > I make small coopered-topped coffers; you can see a couple of early
                  > efforts here:
                  > http://www.albionworks.net/chests.html
                • mmchiliman60@aol.com
                  I made a box with a round top and the way I made the to was I use I cut to ends out of 1 by stock for the curve I wanted then I uses waynes coating for the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 2, 2006
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                    I made a box with a round top and the way I made the to was I use I cut to ends out of 1 by stock for the curve I wanted then I uses waynes coating for the top interlocking them  . but I had to cut off one of the edges on the grove with a razor knife so it would bend and that part went in the inside of trunk . depending how long he is making it I did a big trunk about  2 1/2  feet long but I cut a third piece using the end for the pattern but cutting away the inside so it as only like a 1 1/4 inches wide  for nailing area doesn't need to go all the way down  like the sides  .
                     
                    In a message dated 2/27/2006 11:52:43 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, selkie_bard@... writes:
                    Hi, this is my first post and hopefully someone will be able to help me out. One
                    of my class mates in Wood shop is making a chest with a rounded top and so
                    far no one has found useful directions on how exactly to do that. Him and the
                    teacher have been calling it a "coopered top".  Does any one here have any
                    experience with this type of thing or know where we could get more
                    information on how to do it? 
                                                             
                     
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