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Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Looking for froe sources FOUND

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  • Tom Rettie
    As referenced in The Bayleaf Medieval Farmstead, The Research -- A Road to Discovery, May 1990, Weald and Downland Open Air Museum, Singleton, Chichester,
    Message 1 of 21 , Apr 23, 2003
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      As referenced in "The Bayleaf Medieval Farmstead, The Research -- A Road to
      Discovery," May 1990, Weald and Downland Open Air Museum, Singleton,
      Chichester, West Sussex. ISBN 0-905259-15-7.

      Yep, 1557. It's entirely possible that the original pub date of Tusser has
      been moved back since the OED entry was orignally written. Or maybe the W&D
      got it wrong. You might try checking with the Folger Shakespeare Library to
      see if they have a dated copy of Tusser.

      I'll see if I can find a cross-reference to verify.

      >Me again. (Don't worry I am sure we will move onto something else
      >intersting soon.)
      >I've just managed to gte someone to look up the OED listing for froe
      >and the definition included the following :
      >
      >1573 TUSSER Husb. xvii. (1878) 36 A frower of iron, for cleauing of
      >lath.
      >
      >> > > > From Thomas Tusser's "Husbandry Furniture" (1557), the
      >> following
      >
      >Are you sure of the date on your reference? It would be good to
      >verify which is correct.


      --------------------------------------------------------------
      Tom Rettie tom@...
      Heather Bryden bryden@...
      --------------------------------------------------------------
    • Tom Rettie
      The answer may lie here: http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/hort/history/046.html ... Tom Rettie tom@his.com Heather Bryden
      Message 2 of 21 , Apr 23, 2003
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        The answer may lie here:

        http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/hort/history/046.html

        >Me again. (Don't worry I am sure we will move onto something else
        >intersting soon.)
        >I've just managed to gte someone to look up the OED listing for froe
        >and the definition included the following :
        >
        >1573 TUSSER Husb. xvii. (1878) 36 A frower of iron, for cleauing of
        >lath.
        >
        >> > > > From Thomas Tusser's "Husbandry Furniture" (1557), the
        >> following
        >
        >Are you sure of the date on your reference? It would be good to
        >verify which is correct.


        --------------------------------------------------------------
        Tom Rettie tom@...
        Heather Bryden bryden@...
        --------------------------------------------------------------
      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
        The question was what the lath were used for? From the few froe I have seen it would make sence(sp) because the back of the froe would get beat up in the
        Message 3 of 21 , Apr 23, 2003
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          The question was what the lath were used for? From the few froe I have seen
          it would make sence(sp) because the back of the froe would get beat up in
          the middle of the back of the blade. Not as bad as today where apprentices
          are allowed to hit iron with iron.(the old rule {that I cannot prove}is hit
          iron with wood).

          James Cunningham

          > > The frower for lath would be strait...depending what lath were used
          > for.
          > I meant curved as in the shape of the back of the blade, as opposed
          > to a curved froe that might be used on barrel staves.
        • ghalstead@adelphia.net
          The traditional (for the eastern US) instrument for use with a froe is a club made from the rootball and lower trunk of a small dogwood tree. I suspect that a
          Message 4 of 21 , Apr 23, 2003
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            The traditional (for the eastern US) instrument for use with a froe is a club made from the rootball and lower trunk of a small dogwood tree. I suspect that a medieval European peasant would have used something similiar (i.e.; cheap, easy to get).

            Ranulf

            > From: "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...>
            > Date: 2003/04/23 Wed AM 10:28:46 EDT
            > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Looking for froe sources FOUND
            >
            > The question was what the lath were used for? From the few froe I have seen
            > it would make sence(sp) because the back of the froe would get beat up in
            > the middle of the back of the blade. Not as bad as today where apprentices
            > are allowed to hit iron with iron.(the old rule {that I cannot prove}is hit
            > iron with wood).
            >
            > James Cunningham
            >
            > > > The frower for lath would be strait...depending what lath were used
            > > for.
            > > I meant curved as in the shape of the back of the blade, as opposed
            > > to a curved froe that might be used on barrel staves.
          • Bruce S. R. Lee
            I think you would find that the lath was used for the infill of wattle & daub walls - think of all those 1/2 timber houses in town and country. Another use
            Message 5 of 21 , Apr 24, 2003
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              I think you would find that the 'lath' was used for the infill of wattle &
              daub walls - think of all those 1/2 timber houses in town and country.
              Another use that would consume fair quantities of lath would be hurdles,
              where no suitable withes could be obtained.

              regards
              Brusi of Orkney

              At 10:28 AM 4/23/03 -0400, you wrote:
              >The question was what the lath were used for? From the few froe I have seen
              >it would make sence(sp) because the back of the froe would get beat up in
              >the middle of the back of the blade. Not as bad as today where apprentices
              >are allowed to hit iron with iron.(the old rule {that I cannot prove}is hit
              >iron with wood).
              >
              >James Cunningham
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