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Lund Viking stool

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  • vinlandar
    I spoke with a fellow yesterday who is a professional joiner of historical reproduction furniture, made in the same way the pieces were originally. He told me
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 8, 2002
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      I spoke with a fellow yesterday who is a professional
      joiner of historical reproduction furniture, made in the same way the
      pieces were originally. He told me that the wedges I was wondering
      about, which I drove into slots cut in the legs where the legs join
      the seat were accurate to that period. He doesn't have a computer so
      I could not send him the site, but without seeing the stool I made he
      also told me that in that period the leg would come through the stool
      and be visible on the top. That is just what we can see from the
      photo of the original seat find. I was pleased to learn that. :-)

      -Charlie
    • vinlandar
      Hej, Another thing I learned in that conversation with the joiner was that the probable reason we see more three legged stools and such in that period rather
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 8, 2002
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        Hej,

        Another thing I learned in that conversation with the joiner was that
        the probable reason we see more three legged stools and such in that
        period rather than four was because the dirt and stone floors were
        anything but level. A four legged stool would almost always be
        rocking on two legs, whereas the three leggers would be stable. I
        forgo to mention that before. :-)
        >
        > -Charlie
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