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Re: [MedievalSawdust] saw sharpening file

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    the acutal goal is to make a saw blade from .....something appropriate.... and to be able to sharpen some of the I have. ... Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 5, 2006
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      the acutal goal is to make a saw blade
      from .....something appropriate....

      and to be able to sharpen some of the
      I have.

      --- "Bruce S. R. Lee" <bsrlee2@...> wrote:

      > The Lee Valley files are the correct files for
      > re-sharpening. I've
      > never had to sharpen a Japanese saw, but those files
      > are SHARP - they
      > are very like a knife blade, so watch where your
      > fingers or other
      > body parts are. The factories use CNC controlled
      > diamond coated
      > wheels to cut the original teeth in all but the most
      > expensive, hand
      > made Japanese saws - most people just buy the
      > replacement blades &
      > throw the old one away. I suspect that those files
      > would be excellent
      > for lock making tho'.
      >
      > For sharpening a 'Western' saw, you need a
      > triangular file (3 x 60
      > degrees) & a flat file. You remove the 'set' in the
      > teeth - possibly
      > with a hammer & steel block, file the tops down
      > level using the flat
      > file, then re-cut the teeth with the triangular file
      > (you need a very
      > fine cut file) then re-set the teeth with one of
      > those nifty plier
      > gadgets. My Grandfather had all the gear, and
      > occasionally sharpened
      > his own saws, but eventually decided it was easier
      > to send a bunch
      > off to a 'saw doctor' when he had enough blunt saws
      > to make it
      > worthwhile & then pick them up at the shop a week or
      > two later.
      >
      > Many modern saws are designed to be unsharpenable -
      > they have
      > 'impulse hardened' teeth, which means the teeth are
      > near glass hard
      > from being put thru' some sort of induction furnace.
      > You would have
      > to grind away all of the hardened zone - the blue
      > bit - and cut new
      > teeth from scratch, then re-harden the edge of the
      > blade with
      > something like Oxy-Acetylene. When I wear out some
      > of my cheapies I
      > was thinking of making knives or flat springs out of
      > the left over blade stock.
      >
      > regards
      > Brusi of Orkney
      >
      > At 12:59 PM 4/02/2006, you wrote:
      >
      ><http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32951&cat=1,43072,43089>http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32951&cat=1,43072,43089
      > >
      > >anyone ever use this? Could it be used to
      > >sharpen non-japanese saws?
      > >
      > >Or do you have a sourde for the correct file?
      > >
      > >Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
      > >
      > > Aude Aliquid Dignum
      > > ' Dare Something Worthy '
      >
      >
      >


      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '

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    • Hall, Hayward
      Triagular saw-files (tapered files) come in various sizes depending on the teeth-per-inch of the saw you re sharpeing (or butchering depending on you level of
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 6, 2006
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        Triagular saw-files (tapered files) come in various sizes depending on the teeth-per-inch of the saw you're sharpeing (or butchering depending on you level of skill).  These are specially designed so they leave a rounded gullet (the low part inbetween the teeth) which is less likely to crack or break than a sharp one, as opposed to a 3 cornered file which has sharp edges.
         
        A good reference to saw sharpening is here http://www.vintagesaws.com/library/primer/sharp.html (but I wouldnt recommened their overpriced 'sharpening kit' which comes with a saw to practice on).
         
        So, in answer to the orginal question, no, japanese-saw files would not be a good choice for sharpening what we would consider a standard saw.
         
        Tapered file kits are available online fairly cheap, and they are also available in most hardware stores.
         
        Guillaume


        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
        Sent: Sunday, February 05, 2006 5:54 AM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] saw sharpening file

        the acutal goal is to make a saw blade
        from .....something appropriate....

        and to be able to sharpen some of the
        I have.

        --- "Bruce S. R. Lee" <bsrlee2@...> wrote:

        > The Lee Valley files are the correct files for
        >
        re-sharpening. I've
        > never had to sharpen a Japanese saw, but those
        files
        > are SHARP - they
        > are very like a knife blade, so watch
        where your
        > fingers or other
        > body parts are. The factories use
        CNC controlled
        > diamond coated
        > wheels to cut the original teeth
        in all but the most
        > expensive, hand
        > made Japanese saws - most
        people just buy the
        > replacement blades &
        > throw the old one
        away. I suspect that those files
        > would be excellent
        > for lock
        making tho'.
        >
        > For sharpening a 'Western' saw, you need a
        >
        triangular file (3 x 60
        > degrees) & a flat file. You remove the
        'set' in the
        > teeth - possibly
        > with a hammer & steel block,
        file the tops down
        > level using the flat
        > file, then re-cut the
        teeth with the triangular file
        > (you need a very
        > fine cut file)
        then re-set the teeth with one of
        > those nifty plier
        > gadgets. My
        Grandfather had all the gear, and
        > occasionally sharpened
        > his
        own saws, but eventually decided it was easier
        > to send a bunch
        >
        off to a 'saw doctor' when he had enough blunt saws
        > to make it
        >
        worthwhile & then pick them up at the shop a week or
        > two
        later.
        >
        > Many modern saws are designed to be unsharpenable
        -
        > they have
        > 'impulse hardened' teeth, which means the teeth
        are
        > near glass hard
        > from being put thru' some sort of induction
        furnace.
        > You would have
        > to grind away all  of the hardened
        zone - the blue
        > bit - and cut new
        > teeth from scratch, then
        re-harden the edge of the
        > blade with
        > something like
        Oxy-Acetylene. When I wear out some
        > of my cheapies I
        > was
        thinking of making knives or flat springs out of
        > the left over blade
        stock.
        >
        > regards
        > Brusi of Orkney
        >
        > At
        12:59 PM 4/02/2006, you wrote:
        >
        ><
        href="http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32951&cat=1,43072,43089">http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32951&cat=1,43072,43089>http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p=32951&cat=1,43072,43089
        > >
        > >anyone ever use this?  Could it be used to
        > >sharpen non-japanese saws?
        > >
        > >Or do you have a sourde
        for the correct file?
        > >
        > >Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim
        Hart
        > >
        > >    Aude Aliquid Dignum
        > >      ' Dare Something Worthy '
        >
        >
        >


        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

           Aude Aliquid Dignum
             ' Dare Something Worthy '

        __________________________________________________
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