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RE: [MedievalSawdust] Finding tools

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  • Hall, Hayward
    Welcome to the club. We ll show you the secret handshake later :) I m amazed at how many late 19th century tools I ve found for a few dollars. ... From:
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 27, 2006
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      Welcome to the club. We'll show you the secret handshake later :)

      I'm amazed at how many late 19th century tools I've found for a few
      dollars.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of dairmot
      Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 6:16 PM
      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Finding tools

      Moral of the story. Seek and ye shall find. I have found a lot of
      excellent very useable tools cheaply just by digging abit in antique
      stores.
      THL Finnr
    • Jared
      - Sounds like a heck of a haul, I would almost always pick a used, but very well made old tool over a an average new one. I did just notice in the new Grizzly
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 27, 2006
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        -
        Sounds like a heck of a haul, I would almost always pick a
        used, but very well made old tool over a an average new one. I did
        just notice in the new Grizzly cataloge, a really slick looking,
        mortising gaudge, (Rosewood and full brass, for $12.95!)sounds too
        good to be true, but it looks really good. If anyone knows where to
        get a hold of some decent mortising chisels, (without going into
        servitude to pay for them) let me know,
        I just came upon an interesting philosophy in an article, it basicly
        stated, every tool with a power cord, eventually ends up in the trash,
        while really well made hand tools, could be (and used to be) passed
        down for generations, and that furniture, made by hand, from solid
        lumber (from that bygone era) more often lasts generations.
        I expanded on this thought with my own, we,(I) might today have a
        deeper understanding of joinery, if I had first learned to master it
        with a saw and chisel, rather than a plunge router and fancy jig work.
        This proves itself true when you find a joint nearly impossible to
        make on modern machinery, without overly complex jigwork, but it can
        be easily done with simple hand tools and some expertise.
        Overall I got a new ideal to strive for, rahter than an artisan just
        being someone trying to build something from hundreds of years ago,
        think of building something that will still be around hundreds of
        years from today.
        I'm no where near that good, but it leaves room to grow.
        Jared



        -- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "dairmot" <finnmacart@h...> wrote:
        >
        > So today I took off and went wandering through antique stores. The
        > first one found me buying a rosewood and brass sliding bevel amd a
        > rosewood and brass try square, cost 11.50 for the pair. So I went to
        > my next stop. A larger rosewood and brass try sqaure. Price four
        > and a half bucks. Last stop. I nticed a strange little hammer laying
        > on a shelf. Picking it up I noticed it had no collar. turning it over I
        > could still see the marks made by the smith's hammer oh so many years
        > ago. It was a hand forged head stuck on a chunk of old handle. So I
        > forked over the dollar they were asking and giggled all teh way to the
        > Blazer. The same store had several very nice wooden bodied smoothing
        > planes in teh thirty five dollar range. but i already had spent enough
        > for one day.
        >
        > Moral of the story. Seek and ye shall find. I have found a lot of
        > excellent very useable tools cheaply just by digging abit in antique
        > stores.
        > THL Finnr
        >
      • Elizabeth Brakhage
        I love going to antique stores, garage sales, auctions, etc. The trouble with me going is that I don t know enough yet about tools to know if I am getting a
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 28, 2006
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          I love going to antique stores, garage sales, auctions, etc.  The trouble with me going is that I don't know enough yet about tools to know if I am getting a good one or one that is only good for show now. :-)  I have gotten a couple of draw knives at auctions that could be restored, but at least one that couldn't.
           
          Sara Sophia

          dairmot <finnmacart@...> wrote:
          So today I took off and went wandering through antique stores. The
          first one found me buying a rosewood and brass sliding bevel amd a
          rosewood and brass try square, cost 11.50 for the pair. So I went to
          my next stop. A larger rosewood and brass try sqaure. Price four
          and a half bucks. Last stop. I nticed a strange little hammer laying
          on a shelf. Picking it up I noticed it had no collar. turning it over I
          could still see the marks made by the smith's hammer oh so many years
          ago. It was a hand forged head stuck on a chunk of old handle. So I
          forked over the dollar they were asking and giggled all teh way to the
          Blazer. The same store had several very nice wooden bodied smoothing
          planes in teh thirty five dollar range. but i already had spent enough
          for one day.

          Moral of the story. Seek and ye shall find. I have found a lot of
          excellent very useable tools cheaply just by digging abit in antique
          stores.
          THL Finnr





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        • Daniel
          I would say that most of the time that would be correct. However I m currently using a table saw and drill that were my Grandfather-in-Law s and a Drill press
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 29, 2006
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            I would say that most of the time that would be correct. However I’m currently using a table saw and drill that were my Grandfather-in-Law’s and a Drill press and sander that were my grandfathers. However I have a large amount of hand tools from both that I expect to last much longer and see my grandchildren.

             

            Daniel

             

            -----Original Message-----
            From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jared
            Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 10:06 PM
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Finding tools

             

            -
                   Sounds like a heck of a haul, I would almost always pick a
            used, but very well made old tool over a an average new one.  I did
            just notice in the new Grizzly cataloge, a really slick looking,
            mortising gaudge, (Rosewood and full brass, for $12.95!)sounds too
            good to be true, but it looks really good.  If anyone knows where to
            get a hold of some decent mortising chisels, (without going into
            servitude to pay for them) let me know,
              I just came upon an interesting philosophy in an article, it basicly
            stated, every tool with a power cord, eventually ends up in the trash,
            while really well made hand tools, could be (and used to be) passed
            down for generations, and that furniture, made by hand, from solid
            lumber (from that bygone era) more often lasts generations. 
              I expanded on this thought with my own, we,(I) might today have a
            deeper understanding of joinery, if I had first learned to master it
            with a saw and chisel, rather than a plunge router and fancy jig work. 
            This proves itself true when you find a joint nearly impossible to
            make on modern machinery, without overly complex jigwork, but it can
            be easily done with simple hand tools and some expertise.
              Overall I got a new ideal to strive for, rahter than an artisan just
            being someone trying to build something from hundreds of years ago,
            think of building something that will still be around hundreds of
            years from today.
                   I'm no where near that good, but it leaves room to grow.
                    Jared

             

            -- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "dairmot" <finnmacart@h...> wrote:
            >
            > So today I took off and went wandering through antique  stores. The
            > first one  found me buying a rosewood and brass sliding bevel amd a
            > rosewood and brass try square, cost 11.50 for the pair.  So I went to
            > my next stop.  A larger  rosewood and  brass try sqaure. Price  four
            > and a half bucks.  Last stop. I nticed a strange little hammer laying
            > on a shelf. Picking it up I noticed it had no collar. turning it over I
            > could still see the marks made by the smith's hammer oh so many years
            > ago. It was a hand forged head stuck on a chunk of old handle. So I
            > forked over the dollar they were asking and giggled all teh way to the
            > Blazer.  The same store had several very nice  wooden bodied smoothing
            > planes in teh thirty five dollar range. but i already had spent enough
            > for  one day.
            >
            > Moral of the story.  Seek and ye shall find.  I have found a lot of
            > excellent very useable tools cheaply just by digging abit in antique
            > stores.
            > THL Finnr
            >





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