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Re: [medievalsawdust] Wood finishes

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  • john j tobako
    ... step 3. plead to be let back in... john tobako ________________________________________________________________ Sign Up for Juno Platinum Internet Access
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 6, 2003
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      > > Now. if I can just convince m'Lady to let me build
      > > an ammonia vapor chamber in the back yard.
      > >
      > > Chas.
      > >
      > How to convince your m'Lady....
      >
      > step 1. Start to build a fuming chamber in
      > the basement.
      >
      > I think step 2 should be obvious....
      >
      > step 2. Offer to move it to the backyard.
      >
      step 3. plead to be let back in...

      john tobako

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    • Dan Baker
      I have heard about doing this using just a framework and a plastic tarp taped to make a tent over your items, easier to adjust the size and gone when you are
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11, 2003
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        I have heard about doing this using just a framework and a plastic tarp
        taped to make a tent over your items, easier to adjust the size and gone
        when you are done. Just make sure you get a good seal to keep the ammonia
        in as long as you need it and keep the kids, pets, and stray animals away..
        Not the misquiotes... let them hang out as close as they want.....

        --
        YIS,

        Lord Rhys, Capten gen y Arian Lloer
        Privateer to the Midrealm

        Arafu at dawnsio mewn adlaw
        ...Take time to dance in the rain...




        >
        >O.k. - it ain't period. but.
        >
        >Was doing a bit of reading down at the new Border's bookstore that just
        >opened in Peoria today and ran across a description of how Stickley did the
        >finishes on his Craftsman style furniture.
        >
        >Basically. he primarily used white oak. the oak furniture would be put into
        >an enclosed room in which ammonia fumes were introduced. This is how he
        >achieved the nifty signature dark brown look. The there were three keys to
        >making this work.
        >
        >1: Timing. apparently he worked out a formula for determining how long
        >(in hours) pieces needed to be exposed to the fumes to get the color he was
        >looking for.
        >
        >2: The material had to be 'wet'. fresh oak reacted best. If the oak was
        >too dry it could be wetted by brushing on water.
        >
        >3: Tannin level. Old oak or oak that hadn't been cured properly doesn't
        >have the appropriate levels of tannin to react to the ammonia. The book
        >gave the following solutions:
        >
        > a: Mix 3 tablespoons of tannic acid to one gallon of water and
        >brush it on. let dry.
        > b: (. and this is the cool one). if you don't happen to have access
        >to tannic acid, collect about
        > 3 dozen acorns. boil them in a gallon or so of water. Let the
        >mess cool and discard the acorns.
        > This is supposed to work as well a option a:
        >
        >[. according to the book, you need to let the tannin/water mixture dry to
        >make sure that the tannin are absorbed into the wood.]
        >
        >Now. if I can just convince m'Lady to let me build an ammonia vapor chamber
        >in the back yard.
        >
        >Chas.


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