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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Frame shims or packers

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  • James Winkler
    .. and, had I the good fortune to find what Julian found... I would, in all likelihood... do precisely the same! Wow... what a find ... Chas.
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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      ... and, had I the good fortune to find what Julian found...  I would, in all likelihood...  do precisely the same!  Wow... what a 'find'...
      Chas.
       
      =================
       

      Hey, Caen, when did you join this group <smiling broadly>... welcome!!
       
      And, Julian doesn't "suck"... he just likes to gloat <grin> ... oh, hi, Julian.
    • Bill McNutt
      Please allow me to be the first to say, from the heart, that you suck. And I mean that in the most envious way. Master William McNaughton, CL
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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        Please allow me to be the first to say, from the heart, that “you suck.”

         

        And I mean that in the most envious way.

        Master William McNaughton, CL
        http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood

         


        From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of julian wilson
        Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 6:23 PM
        To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Frame shims or packers

         

        James Renfro <jmrenfro@...> wrote:

        Hello all. I too am one of the lurkers of this list. I am also a Cabinet/woodworker by trade for the last five years, and a veteran of the dreaded installations and I have never heard of plastic shims. I would be interested to hear if there are any problems or troubles with them.

         

        Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].

        My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!

         

        Yours in Service,
        Julian Wilson,

      • James W. Pratt, Jr.
        The proper curse is: May the tempered nail find a home in your planner blade. James Cunningham Who has worked with old timbers I believe that the ONLY proper
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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          The proper curse is: "May the tempered nail find a home in your planner blade."
           
          James Cunningham
          Who has worked with old timbers
          I believe that the ONLY proper response to that is: "You suck!"

          Caen MacAddis
          (needs a new keyboard because his is covered in drool)

          julian wilson wrote:
          Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].
          My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!

        • Arthur Slaughter
          ... Having the joy of living in a hundred year old house that was not only moved to this site in the fifties, but also had a new foundation put under it in the
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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            >>
            >Working with old houses, the walls, let alone the sills, are not square or
            >level. I am not kiding about rebuilding the door frame. Without the sill
            >being level both ways it is impossible to get the door to set solidly,
            >swing
            >correctly, and have that beautiful 3/32 inch clearance all the way round.
            >
            >James Cunningham
            >
            Having the joy of living in a hundred year old house that was not only moved
            to this site in the fifties, but also had a new foundation put under it in
            the seventies, I am in agreement with the whole idea of reframing doors.

            I have one that swings right. My buddy , the former owner went cheap and now
            I am redoing all his work.
            THL Finn

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