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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Learning

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    Having hung doors professionally, I learned a few tricks for hanging doors. My favorite for doors that don t seem to fix correctly.... Blame the framers. ...
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 14, 2005
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      Having hung doors professionally, I learned a few
      tricks
      for hanging doors.

      My favorite for doors that don't seem to fix
      correctly....


      Blame the framers.


      --- "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...> wrote:

      > I have done both, the French door is a pain because
      > you have to get both
      > doors to swing and meet in the middle. The key I
      > have found is have plenty
      > of wedges(to shim with) a REAL good level and try to
      > get the frame for the
      > windows and doors as strait as possible befor puting
      > them in(especially the
      > bottom sill on the doors if it is not level the
      > doors never will be. Do not
      > be afraid to rebuild the house to get it level, it
      > will be less frustrating
      > in the long run). OH yea a bigger rough opening is
      > better you have more
      > room to play. Just make sure you have plenty of
      > stuffing to fill the
      > cracks.
      >
      > James Cunningham
      > Supervising carpenter on Erik the Scouts house and
      > fixer of Countes
      > Shara's...thing.
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "Avery Austringer" <avery1415@...>
      > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 10:45 AM
      > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Learning
      >
      >
      > > Over the holidays I'm making some custom casement
      > windows and a pair of
      > > French doors and have been reading up on the
      > subject to avoid the
      > > obvious failures. In one of my books, in the
      > forward, the author tells
      > > about the first time he hung a door and what a
      > mess it was. After
      > > about 20 different adjustments, trimmings and
      > rehangs he's mostly there
      > > but has pretty much decided he never wants to hang
      > another door again
      > > as long as he lives. At theis point he makes some
      > disparaging remark
      > > about how things have been going when the
      > home-owner say's something
      > > like, "Yeah, but it looks like you're winning".
      > >
      > > The take home message - learning isn't loosing.
      > It just feels like it.
      > >
      > > Avery
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >


      Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

      Aude Aliquid Dignum
      ' Dare Something Worthy '

      __________________________________________________
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    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      ... less than 1 year previous to this email the new home construction trade in Ohio and Kentucky uses wooden shims ( about 12 long ) Cedar or other crappy
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 14, 2005
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        > Am I to take this post - because of Mat's surprise
        > - as meaning that your US Construction Industry
        > doesn't have the same product widely available "off
        > the shelf" from your own Builders' Merchants?
        > Interestedly yours
        >
        > Julian Wilson,
        > in "olde" Jersey.
        >

        less than 1 year previous to this email the new home
        construction trade in Ohio and Kentucky uses wooden
        shims
        ( about 12" long ) Cedar or other crappy woods that
        are'nt
        good for much else'.

        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '

        __________________________________________________
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      • julian wilson
        James Renfro wrote: Hello all. I too am one of the lurkers of this list. I am also a Cabinet/woodworker by trade for the last
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 14, 2005
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          James Renfro <jmrenfro@...> wrote:
          Hello all. I too am one of the lurkers of this list. I am also a Cabinet/woodworker by trade for the last five years, and a veteran of the dreaded installations and I have never heard of plastic shims. I would be interested to hear if there are any problems or troubles with them.
           
          Reply
          No problems I've ever experienced, or even heard of. 
           I carry a mixed handful of the most common shim thicknesses in my van, and find them particularly useful for the installation of window cills, expecially deep ones [a typical local "barn conversion" can call for window cills  28 " front to back because of the original granite walls, the 4"cavity, the 4" concrete blocks of the new inner wall, and the 2.5" thick Thermaboard], door linings - especially those deeper than 5.25 ", and fitted-bedroom- and fitted-kitchen installations.
          Using the graduated, hard-plastic shims makes it both quick and easy to obtain a perfectly plumb and level and plane door- or window- frame, no matter how irregular the opening; - you just place your fixing screws, slide the extended arms of the U-shaped shim around them, and when you tighten the fixing screws there's no compression at all. The shims are 5" long, and 2" wide.
           
          Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].
          My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!



          Yours in Service,
          Julian Wilson,
          [aka. Messire Matthew Baker/Matthieu Besquer, Governor & Castellan of Jersey, 1486-1497: Motto  - "Si vis pacem, para bellum" [Trans:-"if you wish for Peace, prepare for War" ]
          late-medieval Re-enactor; & Historian and Master Artisan to
          "The Companie of the Duke's Leopards",
          [the only mediæval living-history Group in "olde" Jersey]
          Meet us at <www.dukesleopards.org >">
          -


          Play Santa's Celebrity Xmas Party, an exclusive game from Yahoo!
        • James W. Pratt, Jr.
          Working with old houses, the walls, let alone the sills, are not square or level. I am not kiding about rebuilding the door frame. Without the sill being
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 14, 2005
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            Working with old houses, the walls, let alone the sills, are not square or
            level. I am not kiding about rebuilding the door frame. Without the sill
            being level both ways it is impossible to get the door to set solidly, swing
            correctly, and have that beautiful 3/32 inch clearance all the way round.

            James Cunningham
            He is not kidding about the retentive thing.

            > Having hung doors professionally, I learned a few
            > tricks
            > for hanging doors.
            >
            > My favorite for doors that don't seem to fix
            > correctly....
            >
            >
            > Blame the framers.
            >
            >
            > --- "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I have done both, the French door is a pain because
            > > you have to get both
            > > doors to swing and meet in the middle. The key I
            > > have found is have plenty
            > > of wedges(to shim with) a REAL good level and try to
            > > get the frame for the
            > > windows and doors as strait as possible befor puting
            > > them in(especially the
            > > bottom sill on the doors if it is not level the
            > > doors never will be. Do not
            > > be afraid to rebuild the house to get it level, it
            > > will be less frustrating
            > > in the long run). OH yea a bigger rough opening is
            > > better you have more
            > > room to play. Just make sure you have plenty of
            > > stuffing to fill the
            > > cracks.
            > >
            > > James Cunningham
            > > Supervising carpenter on Erik the Scouts house and
            > > fixer of Countes
            > > Shara's...thing.
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: "Avery Austringer" <avery1415@...>
            > > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
            > > Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 10:45 AM
            > > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Learning
            > >
            > >
            > > > Over the holidays I'm making some custom casement
            > > windows and a pair of
            > > > French doors and have been reading up on the
            > > subject to avoid the
            > > > obvious failures. In one of my books, in the
            > > forward, the author tells
            > > > about the first time he hung a door and what a
            > > mess it was. After
            > > > about 20 different adjustments, trimmings and
            > > rehangs he's mostly there
            > > > but has pretty much decided he never wants to hang
            > > another door again
            > > > as long as he lives. At theis point he makes some
            > > disparaging remark
            > > > about how things have been going when the
            > > home-owner say's something
            > > > like, "Yeah, but it looks like you're winning".
            > > >
            > > > The take home message - learning isn't loosing.
            > > It just feels like it.
            > > >
            > > > Avery
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
            >
            > Aude Aliquid Dignum
            > ' Dare Something Worthy '
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            > http://mail.yahoo.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Kip Lytle
            I believe that the ONLY proper response to that is: You suck! Caen MacAddis (needs a new keyboard because his is covered in drool) julian wilson wrote:
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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              I believe that the ONLY proper response to that is: "You suck!"

              Caen MacAddis
              (needs a new keyboard because his is covered in drool)

              julian wilson wrote:
              Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].
              My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!

            • Helen Schultz
              Hey, Caen, when did you join this group ... welcome!! And, Julian doesn t suck ... he just likes to gloat ... oh, hi, Julian.
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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                Hey, Caen, when did you join this group <smiling broadly>... welcome!!
                 
                And, Julian doesn't "suck"... he just likes to gloat <grin> ... oh, hi, Julian.
                 
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL
                Shire of Narrental (Peru, Indiana)  http://narrental.home.comcast.net
                Middle Kingdom
                http://meisterin.katarina.home.comcast.net
                 
                "A room without books is like a body without a soul." -- Cicero
                 
                "The danger in life is not that we aim too high and miss.
                The problem is that we aim too low and hit the mark."  -- Michaelangelo
                 
                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              • James Winkler
                .. and, had I the good fortune to find what Julian found... I would, in all likelihood... do precisely the same! Wow... what a find ... Chas.
                Message 7 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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                  ... and, had I the good fortune to find what Julian found...  I would, in all likelihood...  do precisely the same!  Wow... what a 'find'...
                  Chas.
                   
                  =================
                   

                  Hey, Caen, when did you join this group <smiling broadly>... welcome!!
                   
                  And, Julian doesn't "suck"... he just likes to gloat <grin> ... oh, hi, Julian.
                • Bill McNutt
                  Please allow me to be the first to say, from the heart, that you suck. And I mean that in the most envious way. Master William McNaughton, CL
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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                    Please allow me to be the first to say, from the heart, that “you suck.”

                     

                    And I mean that in the most envious way.

                    Master William McNaughton, CL
                    http://tech.cls.utk.edu/wood

                     


                    From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of julian wilson
                    Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 6:23 PM
                    To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Frame shims or packers

                     

                    James Renfro <jmrenfro@...> wrote:

                    Hello all. I too am one of the lurkers of this list. I am also a Cabinet/woodworker by trade for the last five years, and a veteran of the dreaded installations and I have never heard of plastic shims. I would be interested to hear if there are any problems or troubles with them.

                     

                    Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].

                    My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!

                     

                    Yours in Service,
                    Julian Wilson,

                  • James W. Pratt, Jr.
                    The proper curse is: May the tempered nail find a home in your planner blade. James Cunningham Who has worked with old timbers I believe that the ONLY proper
                    Message 9 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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                      The proper curse is: "May the tempered nail find a home in your planner blade."
                       
                      James Cunningham
                      Who has worked with old timbers
                      I believe that the ONLY proper response to that is: "You suck!"

                      Caen MacAddis
                      (needs a new keyboard because his is covered in drool)

                      julian wilson wrote:
                      Talking barn conversions, BTW, - read the following and weep, guys: - we are just re-roofing an old farmhouse complex being turned into 8 dwelling units; and I have acquired several tons of the original roof and barn-floor timbers, dating from the 17th and late 18th Centuries. All in good condition, and re-cycleable. Oak and pitchpine. Plus four oak lintols from the first late 15th Century farmhouse on the site, which became first the dower cottage, and then the herdsman's cottage as the family got richer, and susequently built  bigger & better houses alongside each-other [roughly one every century].
                      My Living History group will not only be able to have reproduction furniture and other woodwork items, they'll be able to have them made from antique timber!

                    • Arthur Slaughter
                      ... Having the joy of living in a hundred year old house that was not only moved to this site in the fifties, but also had a new foundation put under it in the
                      Message 10 of 20 , Dec 15, 2005
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                        >>
                        >Working with old houses, the walls, let alone the sills, are not square or
                        >level. I am not kiding about rebuilding the door frame. Without the sill
                        >being level both ways it is impossible to get the door to set solidly,
                        >swing
                        >correctly, and have that beautiful 3/32 inch clearance all the way round.
                        >
                        >James Cunningham
                        >
                        Having the joy of living in a hundred year old house that was not only moved
                        to this site in the fifties, but also had a new foundation put under it in
                        the seventies, I am in agreement with the whole idea of reframing doors.

                        I have one that swings right. My buddy , the former owner went cheap and now
                        I am redoing all his work.
                        THL Finn

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