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Re: dovetails

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  • Ralph Lindberg
    I recall reading an article on half-blind that ascribed them to 18th Century, but, given the general accuracy of most books, I wouldn t take that to A&S
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 22, 2005
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      I recall reading an article on half-blind that ascribed them to 18th
      Century, but, given the general accuracy of most books, I wouldn't
      take that to A&S documentation.

      I just looked at Wikipedia, and noted that dovetail joints were used
      in early China (referencing tomb finds)

      Ralg
      AnTir
    • Tim Bray
      Always hard to prove a negative... but so far, I have seen no evidence that half-blind dovetails were used in pre-1600 Europe. The earliest use of corner
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 22, 2005
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        Always hard to prove a negative... but so far, I have seen no evidence that half-blind dovetails were used in pre-1600 Europe.

        The earliest use of corner dovetails in Northern Europe that I can document are in the 15th - 16th c. altarpieces from the Low Countries; the carcase holding the entire assemblage together was usually dovetailed.  There is one such in Brussels that is well dated to the 1430s.  Sometime in the 15th c. they modified the regular corner dovetail joint by mitering the face.

        I wouldn't rule out blind dovetailing for late 16th c. chests, though.  There are a number of them in paintings that do not show any joinery at all, with apparently mitered corners; perhaps these were blind-dovetailed?  (Or perhaps the artist just didn't want to clutter his art with joinery details.)

        Cheers,
        Colin


        At 01:50 AM 11/22/2005 +0000, you wrote:
        Dose anyone know if a half blind dove tail is SCA period?

        Meaning is ther any pices of wood, that have them, that come from pre

        1500 AD or the 16th century.

        Thanks
        Bill






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      • Ralph Lindberg
        ... clutter his ... Colin, the later would be my bet. Consider that certain clueless Armor Experts came with with several dozen bogus types of Mail, simply
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 22, 2005
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Tim Bray <tbray@m...> wrote:
          >
          >...
          >
          > I wouldn't rule out blind dovetailing for late 16th c. chests,
          > though. There are a number of them in paintings that do not show any
          > joinery at all, with apparently mitered corners; perhaps these were
          > blind-dovetailed? (Or perhaps the artist just didn't want to
          clutter his
          > art with joinery details.)
          >
          Colin, the later would be my bet. Consider that certain clueless
          "Armor Experts" came with with several dozen bogus types of Mail,
          simply due to how artists drew/painted/carved.

          Ralg
          AnTir
        • Iason Vorax
          I am am working up to making pattens (the kind of wooden overshoe with stilts) using period tools and techniques. I have made a first pair with whatever was on
          Message 4 of 8 , Jan 15, 2006
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            I am am working up to making pattens (the kind of wooden overshoe with
            stilts)
            using period tools and techniques. I have made a first pair with
            whatever was on hand
            (band saw to rough it our, chisels rasps, and gouges) and have already
            learned that
            it is very important that the leather you use for the upper isn't prone
            to stretching.
            (My leather is stretching over a shoe size each wearing :-<).

            One of the main pictures I have seen of a patten maker at work show an adz
            and several draw knives hung on the wall. So I am wondering if it is
            reasonable
            to assume that I can do most of the work with just those tools, or are more
            required? Does anyone have any references to patten construction technique?
            The Museum of London book and other patten references don't seem to have
            much on the tools / work flow. I am hoping that somewhere there are
            inventories,
            or guild records or account records of what tools a patten maker would own.

            Cheers,

            Jason the Voracious
            AKA John pattenmayker
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