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Rope bed

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  • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
    I ended up with 6 inch spacing. It worked out pretty well. Almost even without being too close to the ends of the frame boards. Have had a REALLY productive
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 23, 2002
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      I ended up with 6 inch spacing. It worked out
      pretty well. Almost even without being too close
      to the ends of the frame boards.

      Have had a REALLY productive weekend. Almost finished
      two plywood coffer chairs ( for a squire-brother and
      his lady ) ( need two 8x26" pieces of plywood for the
      backs ) and got everything but the headboard made for
      the new bed.

      Anyone got any ideas on headboards?
      ( 2x12 pine material )

      oh yeah.... and I made a big pile of sawdust!


      Conal

      --- In medievalsawdust@y..., "James Winkler"
      <jrwinkler@m...> wrote:
      > I really like the idea of a center support for the
      ropes... keeps
      the sag down to a minimum... cool idea. I have some
      books that show
      some period beds that appear to be rope beds... I'll
      try to do some
      measuring and basic math to see if I can determine how
      far apart the
      holes are...
      >
      > Chas.
      >


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    • Ron
      My apologies if this appears twice. I sent it last night, but don t see it in the messages. Sean asked recently about the rope bed from the ivory carving at
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 24, 2010
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        My apologies if this appears twice. I sent it last night, but don't see it in the messages.

        Sean asked recently about the rope bed from the ivory carving at the Victoria and Albert museum. I built my version a few weeks ago, and have posted several pictures in my Photo folder (Bayard's Work).

        I made mine in ash. I turned the legs with a square section to receive a through mortise from the longer side rails on one face, and a 1" diameter hole on the other face for the round tenon on the end rails. I turned the end rails with coves to hold the ropes at the correct spacing, but used a rectangular section with rounded-over corners for the side rails. The shape is stronger in bending, and I wanted the ropes to be able to slide along the length when tightening. I didn't include a dowel between the main weave of ropes and the tightening rope, but it seems to work well without it.

        The whole thing breaks down into 8 pieces, which I carry in a Panther tent pole bag. I've had it out at one camping event and got a number of positive comments. One family wanted to know if the posts could be modified to make a bunk bend.

        Bayard.
      • Sean Powell
        Dang that is a nice bed. It makes mine look crude and bulky. I opted for pine for cost but I sized it to take a twin size air mattress so my daughter could use
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 24, 2010
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          Dang that is a nice bed. It makes mine look crude and bulky.

          I opted for pine for cost but I sized it to take a twin size air
          mattress so my daughter could use it for a number of years. She's 5. By
          10 she'll want more then a cot. I'm poly-urethaning it this morning.
          Once it dries I'll lace it and take photos. How would I go about
          creating a sub-folder for my own photos on this yahoo group?

          Sean

          On 7/24/2010 9:34 AM, Ron wrote:
          > My apologies if this appears twice. I sent it last night, but don't see it in the messages.
          >
          > Sean asked recently about the rope bed from the ivory carving at the Victoria and Albert museum. I built my version a few weeks ago, and have posted several pictures in my Photo folder (Bayard's Work).
          >
          > I made mine in ash. I turned the legs with a square section to receive a through mortise from the longer side rails on one face, and a 1" diameter hole on the other face for the round tenon on the end rails. I turned the end rails with coves to hold the ropes at the correct spacing, but used a rectangular section with rounded-over corners for the side rails. The shape is stronger in bending, and I wanted the ropes to be able to slide along the length when tightening. I didn't include a dowel between the main weave of ropes and the tightening rope, but it seems to work well without it.
          >
          > The whole thing breaks down into 8 pieces, which I carry in a Panther tent pole bag. I've had it out at one camping event and got a number of positive comments. One family wanted to know if the posts could be modified to make a bunk bend.
          >
          > Bayard.
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • AqA WyrdWynd
          wow !!!uch a simple elegant  piece...now will it hold four hundred pounds of a a toss-n-tuning 250 LB-er...cause i want one pete have at ye with a flock of
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 24, 2010
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            wow !!!uch a simple elegant  piece...now will it hold four hundred pounds of a a toss-n-tuning 250 LB-er...cause i want one

            pete

            have at ye with a flock of flaming yodeling hamsters !!!



            --- On Sat, 7/24/10, Ron <williams@...> wrote:

            From: Ron <williams@...>
            Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Rope bed
            To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, July 24, 2010, 9:34 AM

            My apologies if this appears twice.  I sent it last night, but don't see it in the messages.

            Sean asked recently about the rope bed from the ivory carving at the Victoria and Albert museum.  I built my version a few weeks ago, and have posted several pictures in my Photo folder (Bayard's Work).

            I made mine in ash.  I turned the legs with a square section to receive a through mortise from the longer side rails on one face, and a 1" diameter hole on the other face for the round tenon on the end rails.  I turned the end rails with coves to hold the ropes at the correct spacing, but used a rectangular section with rounded-over corners for the side rails.  The shape is stronger in bending, and I wanted the ropes to be able to slide along the length when tightening.  I didn't include a dowel between the main weave of ropes and the tightening rope, but it seems to work well without it.

            The whole thing breaks down into 8 pieces, which I carry in a Panther tent pole bag.  I've had it out at one camping event and got a number of positive comments.  One family wanted to know if the posts could be modified to make a bunk bend.

            Bayard.



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          • John LaTorre
            ... Well done! I included the dowel on my beds on the theory that you don t have rope sawing against rope. Whether it helps the ropes last longer is something
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 24, 2010
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              Bayard wrote:

              > I didn't include a dowel between the main weave of ropes and the tightening rope, but it seems to work well without it.
              >

              Well done! I included the dowel on my beds on the theory that you don't
              have rope sawing against rope. Whether it helps the ropes last longer is
              something remains to be proved, though. My original bed is now six or
              seven years old, and the rope (1/4" manila) don't show any signs of wear.

              The dowel also helps spread the load of the tightening rope over a
              larger area.


              Johann von Drachenfels
              West Kingdom
            • Sean Powell
              Well it s not nearly as pretty as Bayard s or as historically accurate as Bayard s but it is done. This is a twin sized bed frame based VERY LOOSELY on the
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 27, 2010
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                Well it's not nearly as pretty as Bayard's or as historically accurate
                as Bayard's but it is done. This is a twin sized bed frame based VERY
                LOOSELY on the Byzantine rope bed. At least it functions the same way.
                Corner posts are 4x4 fir. The rails are 1.75" hand-railing (yes there
                are flats) and the head and foot boards 1x6 and 1x8. The headboard was
                added simply to keep the pillow from walling off or bumping into wet
                canvas on a rainy night. Took 100 ft of rope to lace it. I'm thinking
                about adding a boat cleat someplace inconspicuous so the tension rope
                can be easily cinched down and anchored.

                Comments and critiques welcome (warning, pictures may be large) and
                sorry about the poor background. It was dark by the time I got it laced
                together.

                Sean

                http://s161.photobucket.com/albums/t239/Eliz-Rivenstar/Seans%20Shop/?action=view¤t=Photo0371.jpg
                http://s161.photobucket.com/albums/t239/Eliz-Rivenstar/Seans%20Shop/?action=view¤t=Photo0369.jpg
                http://s161.photobucket.com/albums/t239/Eliz-Rivenstar/Seans%20Shop/?action=view¤t=Photo0368.jpg

                On 7/24/2010 9:34 AM, Ron wrote:
                > My apologies if this appears twice. I sent it last night, but don't see it in the messages.
                >
                > Sean asked recently about the rope bed from the ivory carving at the Victoria and Albert museum. I built my version a few weeks ago, and have posted several pictures in my Photo folder (Bayard's Work).
                >
                > I made mine in ash. I turned the legs with a square section to receive a through mortise from the longer side rails on one face, and a 1" diameter hole on the other face for the round tenon on the end rails. I turned the end rails with coves to hold the ropes at the correct spacing, but used a rectangular section with rounded-over corners for the side rails. The shape is stronger in bending, and I wanted the ropes to be able to slide along the length when tightening. I didn't include a dowel between the main weave of ropes and the tightening rope, but it seems to work well without it.
                >
                > The whole thing breaks down into 8 pieces, which I carry in a Panther tent pole bag. I've had it out at one camping event and got a number of positive comments. One family wanted to know if the posts could be modified to make a bunk bend.
                >
                > Bayard.
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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