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Re: [MedievalSawdust] Saws

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  • Heath Barlin
    Do a search on Joseph or Noah and his ark. There are a number of pictures of medieval carpenters and thus saws. The ;scimitar shaped saw can be found here
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 15, 2005
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      Do a search on Joseph or Noah and his ark. There are a number of pictures of medieval carpenters and thus saws.
       
      This has links to a number of other sites with images.
       
      If you can get a hold of "The Mastermyr Find" by Greta Arwidsson and Gosta Gotland if has late Viking age saws both draw and photographed. I believe they are also in the above link.
       
      Cheers,
      Heath
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, October 15, 2005 1:20 AM
      Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Saws

      >I've been looking for ages to find a period saw...

      When you say period saw, what do you mean?  (We'd all
      love the URL of a website with pictures!) 

      The frame saw* seems to not have changed much in the
      last 1000 years.  You can still get those at most
      specialty woodworking places here in the states.  Some
      of the frames are more authentic than others, but
      building one should not prove too much of a challenge.

      The two frame saw blades I have are from a company in
      Germany, but the name eludes me at the moment.  Buff
      out the makers mark and you'd pretty much be there.

      The other type of medieval saw I'm familiar with look
      an awful lot like the Japanese Kobiki, Kataba and
      Dozuki saws.  I'm not sure if these cut on the draw
      like their Japanese counterparts are not though.

      Avery

      * We can debate what this means but both types, whith
      the rectangular all wood frame** and H-shaped frame
      were there.

      **Anybody know how they tensioned these?  I can
      document a period wing nut (No, REALLY!  On a suit of
      armor.) but I can't imagine that these were what you
      would call common.


    • Avery Austringer
      ... non- blade ends of each leg a few times, place the stick in the middle, and use the stick to put some twist in the cord. A partial re-edit has left me
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 17, 2005
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        >Wing nuts?!?!? Much simpler is a goodly length of
        >linen cord and a stick. Wind the cord around the
        non->blade ends of each leg a few times, place the
        stick >in the middle, and use the stick to put some
        twist in >the cord.

        A partial re-edit has left me undone.

        Yes, that gets the kind with a frame shaped like a
        capital H, with the blace across the bottom of the two
        legs and the cord across the top. What I'm wondering
        about is the kind that has a rectangular frame with
        the blade going from one cross bar to another.

        I would expect that they didn't use cord here becasue
        the blade would twist and cause no end of cussing. I
        can imagine a way to do it with wedges but I'm
        wondering if there is artwork somewhere (or an
        artifact) that shows us how they did it.

        Avery
      • Joseph Paul
        That is the kind used in a pit saw. Jamie ... From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Avery Austringer Sent:
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 17, 2005
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          That is the kind used in a pit saw.
          Jamie
          -----Original Message-----
          From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Avery Austringer
          Sent: Monday, October 17, 2005 1:46 PM
          To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Saws

          >Wing nuts?!?!?  Much simpler is a goodly length of
          >linen cord and a stick.  Wind the cord around the
          non->blade ends of each leg a few times, place the
          stick >in the middle, and use the stick to put some
          twist in >the cord.

          A partial re-edit has left me undone.

          Yes, that gets the kind with a frame shaped like a
          capital H, with the blace across the bottom of the two
          legs and the cord across the top.  What I'm wondering
          about is the kind that has a rectangular frame with
          the blade going from one cross bar to another. 

          I would expect that they didn't use cord here becasue
          the blade would twist and cause no end of cussing.  I
          can imagine a way to do it with wedges but I'm
          wondering if there is artwork somewhere (or an
          artifact) that shows us how they did it.

          Avery
        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
          Try looking for info on a shash saw ... Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something Worthy __________________________________ Start
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 17, 2005
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            Try looking for info on a 'shash saw'




            --- Joseph Paul <josephnjody@...> wrote:

            > That is the kind used in a pit saw.
            > Jamie
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
            > Avery Austringer
            > Sent: Monday, October 17, 2005 1:46 PM
            > To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Saws
            >
            >
            > >Wing nuts?!?!? Much simpler is a goodly length
            > of
            > >linen cord and a stick. Wind the cord around the
            > non->blade ends of each leg a few times, place the
            > stick >in the middle, and use the stick to put
            > some
            > twist in >the cord.
            >
            > A partial re-edit has left me undone.
            >
            > Yes, that gets the kind with a frame shaped like a
            > capital H, with the blace across the bottom of the
            > two
            > legs and the cord across the top. What I'm
            > wondering
            > about is the kind that has a rectangular frame
            > with
            > the blade going from one cross bar to another.
            >
            > I would expect that they didn't use cord here
            > becasue
            > the blade would twist and cause no end of cussing.
            > I
            > can imagine a way to do it with wedges but I'm
            > wondering if there is artwork somewhere (or an
            > artifact) that shows us how they did it.
            >
            > Avery
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

            Aude Aliquid Dignum
            ' Dare Something Worthy '



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          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
            If the legs are long enough you could bend them enough to slip them into mortis holes. A three foot 1 by 2 would shorten enough for a 1/2 deep mortis. Or the
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 17, 2005
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              If the legs are long enough you could bend them enough to slip them into
              mortis holes. A three foot 1 by 2 would shorten enough for a 1/2 deep
              mortis. Or the whole thing could be put together and then bent(with a
              twisted cord), then the saw blade but in, then the twisted cord removed. The
              tension on the blade would be only a little less than the tension of the
              twisted cord.

              James Cunningham


              > Yes, that gets the kind with a frame shaped like a
              > capital H, with the blace across the bottom of the two
              > legs and the cord across the top. What I'm wondering
              > about is the kind that has a rectangular frame with
              > the blade going from one cross bar to another.
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