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Re: Authenticity

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  • Tom Rettie
    ... hand. ... shows and ... Excellent idea. There s no better way to get in touch with the sawdust of our ancestors than to work with their tools and
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 13, 2005
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      --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, kit_houston@p... wrote:

      >While power tools are fast and easy i want to start doing things by
      hand.
      > I also want to start taking wood working / armouring / craft to
      shows and
      > events to do in front of the public / fill my spare time.

      Excellent idea. There's no better way to get in touch with the
      sawdust of our ancestors than to work with their tools and
      techniques. And woodworking makes a great demo activity.

      > The one major problem is with modern timber. I want to take my
      > authenticity as far as finished wood. ie. i don't have the time,
      skill or
      > know how to chop down trees (well i could do that bit) and make
      plank's.
      > So i will be starting with pre-cut timber.

      That's not really a problem. I'm not so much up on the 14th century,
      but by the 15th century carpenters are working in both green and
      seasoned stock. And not everyone is going from tree to finish piece;
      many craftsmen are purchasing from timber mongers. See Ranulf's
      article on the timber trade at:

      http://www.medievalwoodworking.com/articles/lumber_trade.htm

      He's also got a Compleate Anachronist on period tools that's worth
      looking at.

      I suggest finding a good lumber yard or two in your area. Not a Home
      Center; their stuff will be overpriced and overmilled. A real lumber
      yard can sell you rough cut stock in varying thicknesses (measured
      in "quarters" of an inch). If you buy 4-quarter stock, it will be a
      true 1-inch thick and give you plenty of room to practice planing
      and jointing a board. The result will look more like a period
      piece, tool marks and all, than something that's been run through a
      power planer. Lumber yards also frequently have a "shorts" bin with
      scraps for very cheap (or free), good for practicing on.

      > I'm doing the 14th century , is there a good manuscript or
      painting with
      > variety of wood tools form this century?. If not ill be using the
      > below........

      There are quite a number of period illustrations, though most of the
      ones I'm familiar with start in the 15th century. Look for pictures
      of Noah or Joseph, both biblical woodworkers who are frequently
      illustrated at work.

      > I have read through http://www.his.com/~tom/TOOLS.PDF and from
      that have a
      > basic idea of the tools used.
      > I'm going to a blacksmithing convention this weekend and want to
      ask some
      > of the guys there to quote on making the tools.
      > Is ther anything missing from he above that i should consider?

      Well, as the author of that article I'd say it's a fair starting
      point, with a few provisos. The guys in that picture are doing large-
      scale timber framing. If you're starting on small-scale carpentry,
      you may want a slightly different tool set.

      You probably won't need a lot of axes, but a good broad hatchet is
      handy. Don't run out and buy a froe unless you're going to need one
      (for some reason, everybody buys a froe). A good drawknife is also
      very useful.

      You'll definitely want some good quality chisels and gouges. You
      won't need a full set at first. I find I use by 3/8 and 1-inch
      mortising chisels a lot, and the 1/4 is handy.

      Saws can be a little problematic; while you can buy modern frame
      saws that look close to period, I haven't found any commercial
      models that come close to the "scimitar" profile of some period
      ones. Be sure to have both a good crosscut and rip saw; I see a lot
      of folks get frustrated because they're trying to rip with a
      crosscut (which quickly drives them to the tablesaw).

      Wood-bodied planes are still available both new and used. Do some
      reading on their use and maintenance before buying, esp. used. There
      are some that have been so abused they just aren't worth trying to
      fix (they get sold for decoration).

      While I can't document a shaving horse to the 14th century, it's
      also very useful to have.

      Many of the tools you'll need can be bought commercially, new or
      used. Keep an eye open for old tool shows and auctions (PATINA has a
      good one every spring in Maryland). In my opinion, it's better to
      have a few good quality tools than many tools that are cheap or worn
      out. I think hand-forged tools are great, but it's hard to find
      smiths that know how to make them.

      A tool box is a good first project, and it gives you something to
      tote your stuff around in. Some simple stake-leg benches are also
      handy as sawhorses.

      I also strongly recommend Roy Underhill's "Woodwright" series of
      books (and TV show) as an accessible introduction to using hand
      tools. He won't give you measured drawings, but he's good at getting
      into that pre-industrial mindset.

      Hope that helps some. Feel free to drop me a line with questions.

      Regards,

      Tom R. (Fin)
    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      ... just pretend you are a jointer or a cabinetmaker and you therefore purchase your lumber from a sawyer. Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 13, 2005
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        > > Is this worth it ? or will it just look like messy
        > modern timber?
        > >
        >


        just pretend you are a jointer or a cabinetmaker
        and you therefore purchase your lumber from a sawyer.





        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '




        __________________________________
        Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Jon Terris
        ... I ve been looking for ages to find a period saw, I m talking to a blacksmith over here (UK) about having one made, his suggestion was to get an old saw and
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 14, 2005
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          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Rettie" <tom@h...> wrote:
          > Saws can be a little problematic; while you can buy modern frame
          > saws that look close to period, I haven't found any commercial
          > models that come close to the "scimitar" profile of some period
          > ones.

          I've been looking for ages to find a period saw, I'm talking to a
          blacksmith over here (UK) about having one made, his suggestion was to
          get an old saw and then he'll get it cut down into the correct shape
          by a colleague. A couple of my timber framing friends have done the
          same thing and they look great, they do take a bit of getting used to
          though!
        • James W. Pratt, Jr.
          Got any pictures of the scimitar profile saws? James Cunningham asking the obvious...well to you guys...not to me
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 14, 2005
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            Got any pictures of the "scimitar" profile saws?

            James Cunningham
            asking the obvious...well to you guys...not to me
          • Tom Rettie
            ... They show up several places, such as in the Bedford Book of Hours picture of Noah: http://www.wga.hu/art/zgothic/miniatur/1401-450/01f_1401.jpg There s
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 14, 2005
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              --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
              <cunning@f...> wrote:

              > Got any pictures of the "scimitar" profile saws?

              They show up several places, such as in the Bedford Book of Hours
              picture of Noah:

              http://www.wga.hu/art/zgothic/miniatur/1401-450/01f_1401.jpg

              There's also the "big bread knife" profile such as here:

              http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/m/master/flemalle/merode/3mero_r.jpg

              There's a nice one of a frame saw/bow saw here:

              http://www.uncletaz.com/classgallery/raphael/buildark.html

              and here:

              http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/011.jpg
              http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/020.jpg
              http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/087.jpg
            • James W. Pratt, Jr.
              Good stuff!! Thanks! James Cunningham ... From: Tom Rettie To: Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 2:00 PM
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 14, 2005
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                Good stuff!! Thanks!

                James Cunningham
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Tom Rettie" <tom@...>
                To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, October 14, 2005 2:00 PM
                Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Re: Authenticity


                > --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, "James W. Pratt, Jr."
                > <cunning@f...> wrote:
                >
                > > Got any pictures of the "scimitar" profile saws?
                >
                > They show up several places, such as in the Bedford Book of Hours
                > picture of Noah:
                >
                > http://www.wga.hu/art/zgothic/miniatur/1401-450/01f_1401.jpg
                >
                > There's also the "big bread knife" profile such as here:
                >
                > http://gallery.euroweb.hu/art/m/master/flemalle/merode/3mero_r.jpg
                >
                > There's a nice one of a frame saw/bow saw here:
                >
                > http://www.uncletaz.com/classgallery/raphael/buildark.html
                >
                > and here:
                >
                > http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/011.jpg
                > http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/020.jpg
                > http://homepage.univie.ac.at/rudolf.koch/mendel/087.jpg
                >
                >
                >
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                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
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