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Re: [MedievalSawdust] electric motor question

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  • James W. Pratt, Jr.
    A friend came by with a Three phase lathe and he already had a converter on it I think he said $70 and it was the size of a box of tea. James Cunningham ...
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 3, 2005
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      A friend came by with a Three phase lathe and he already had a converter on
      it I think he said $70 and it was the size of a box of tea.

      James Cunningham
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Lew Newby" <gideon@...>
      To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, September 25, 2005 3:42 AM
      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] electric motor question


      > Without seeing more of the mechanism I can only speculate that replacing
      > the motor would not be as easy as it seems, If it is a varidrive system
      > motor it will be coupled with a geared transmission you still may be
      > able to find something though.
      >
      > As for the Electrical component, I can't read the top line very clear
      > and Wolf's statement of it being 3 phase is highly likely. It appears
      > this was designed for an industrial shop. The fact that it uses 208
      > Volts is a solid indicator that it is indeed a 3 phase motor and you
      > will have an issue putting it into your home on the standard 220 line
      > which remains single phase. It requires special service to be installed
      > for 3 phase wiring in a home and is normally only done in industrial
      > settings. Here is a link on 3 phase power,
      >
      > http://www.faqs.org/faqs/electrical-wiring/part2/section-10.html
      >
      >
      > Farin
      >
      > celtwolf@... wrote:
      >
      > > Baron Conal;
      > >
      > > I'd love to be able to see the plate in person to be sure (or at least
      > > be able to
      > > download the "real" hi-res picture), but I'd say you've got a 3 phase
      > > motor made
      > > for the American market before 1967 or so, that runs on 208 volts.
      > > Not that
      > > unusual, really - in the 80's I worked on a mainframe that ran on
      > > 208. If it
      > > doesn't have a cord, I'd suggest talking an electrician into putting
      > > one on for
      > > you. If you're lucky, you "might" be able to reduce it to a 110 motor
      > > (the "Lo
      > > Volts/Hi Volts" under the model # and output torque) - I've got a
      > > motor that I
      > > picked up which can be re-wired in this way.
      > >
      > > Otherwise, I hope your shop has 220v! If it does, the motor should
      > > run just fine
      > > on that.
      > >
      > > Wolf
      > >
      > > Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:
      > >
      > > > I have got the lathe into the basement
      > > >
      > > > and I've looked closer at the motor on it
      > > >
      > > > and I am a woodworker....
      > > >
      > > > ...not an electrician
      > > >
      > > > I'm gonna up-load a copy of the picture
      > > > into the files section of the group, but in the
      > > > mean time...
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/baronconal/detail?.dir=f6e5&.dnm=bbe8.jpg&.src=ph
      > >
      <http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/baronconal/detail?.dir=f6e5&.dnm=bbe8.jpg&.sr
      c=ph>
      > > >
      > > > It is a high resolution picture and if you zoom in you
      > > >
      > > > can read 99% of the numbers
      > > >
      > > > anyone know what I've got?
      > > >
      > > > and can explain it to me in small words
      > > > that a woodworker might understand?
      > > >
      > > > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
      > > >
      > > > Aude Aliquid Dignum
      > > > ' Dare Something Worthy '
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > __________________________________
      > > > Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
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      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
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      >
      > --
      > Lew Newby Jr.
      > dragon@...
      > ****** Draco Aliquando Vincent ******
      > (At some time the dragon shall conquer)
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    • sancoeur
      Dredging up an old thread, I know - but this has been bugging me for some reason, and I felt compelled to do some more research. Farin s link was a good one
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 13, 2005
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        Dredging up an old thread, I know - but this has been bugging me for
        some reason, and I felt compelled to do some more research. Farin's
        link was a good one for a "yes or no" answer, but I just had to have
        more, which I found at http://www.du.edu/~jcalvert/tech/threeph.htm
        (CAUTION: do NOT go here if you don't like math!).

        Then I got to wondering how my motor works just fine in the 120/240
        world, and had a second look. Where the cord goes in is a small
        removeable plate. Take the plate off, and it has a wiring diagram for
        various voltages...and a whole boat-load of connectors. In other
        words, it apparently has an internal capacitor/load balancer, and was
        engineered for use in a variety of computing environments. I got
        lucky.

        Considering the age of the motor, I'd suggest replacing it with a
        single-phase. It's certainly cheaper than trying to get three-phase
        into your shop!

        So to answer your question of "anyone know what I've got?
        > > > >
        > > > > and can explain it to me in small words
        > > > > that a woodworker might understand?"

        A heckofa paperweight, or boat-anchor.

        Wolf
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