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pallets with new question

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  • mahee of acre
    So at least in this respect, I am not a total nut case...as long as all the nails are pulled before sanding. Thank you all for your words of experience.
    Message 1 of 27 , Aug 28, 2005
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      So at least in this respect, I am not a total nut case...as long as
      all the nails are pulled before sanding.

      Thank you all for your words of experience.

      Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another?

      your servant,
      mahee
    • kjworz@comcast.net
      Well, even wood experts have trouble being absolutely sure what wood is when looking at a mystery board. If it is diffues porous and hard, it looks like it has
      Message 2 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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        Well, even wood experts have trouble being absolutely sure what wood is when looking at a mystery board.

        If it is diffues porous and hard, it looks like it has distinct grain lines, then it is generally an oak. If you get some rays in it and it is lighter in color it may be white oak. Redish tinge is a red or black oak.

        I saw a couple pallets that had walnut in them. It made for poor pallets as they were cut thin and the sap wood was weak. It seemed almost as weak as poplar with the dark heartwood.

        If the pallet is from overseas it may well be Luan, aka Phillipine Mahogany. You can get some weird stuff from foreign pallets. Sources: Motorcycle dealers, lawn tractor places.

        Non diffuse porous was maple, generally, unless the wood was more flexible and often fuzzy, then we figured it was poplar.

        The way we could tell if a pallet was hard wood or soft pine of some sort was by weight and how quickly the kegs broke the pallet.

        Remember, these are east coast observations. I have no idea what Californian pallets are like.

        Just becaue they are using #3 and #4 grade lumber to make pallets doesn't mean that the #1 stuff doesn't get in there. And even #3 and #4 has lengths of 'good' boards so you can end up with short lengths of furniture grade stuff scrounging from pallets. And since many of us are hobbiests this is fine. Pallet wood make great drawer parts. I'd hate to make a living at cabinetmaking just from pallet wood.

        --
        -Chris Schwartz
        Silver Spring, MD


        > So at least in this respect, I am not a total nut case...as long as
        > all the nails are pulled before sanding.
        >
        > Thank you all for your words of experience.
        >
        > Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another?
        >
        > your servant,
        > mahee
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Ralph Lindberg
        In the PNW (AnTir) local pallets tend to be Doug Fir/Hemlock/Pine One of my in-law-uncles used to work in a lumber mill. They got all their machines from the
        Message 3 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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          In the PNW (AnTir) local pallets tend to be Doug Fir/Hemlock/Pine

          One of my in-law-uncles used to work in a lumber mill. They got all
          their machines from the far-east. He got some of the oddest woods from
          them.

          As others have pointed out, pallets can be a great source for short
          pieces of quality wood (or just stuff for the fire place)

          Ralg
          AnTir
        • Helen Schultz
          Mahee asked: Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another? I just did a Google search on wood identification and it brought up lots of pages
          Message 4 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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            Mahee asked: Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another?
            I just did a Google search on "wood identification" and it brought up lots of pages you could look through... one of the nicest I found in a very quick look was this one: 
             
             
            It has some good color photos of different types of wood.  Long ago, when I was learning how to be a carpenter for the Air Force (Gawd, was that 30 years ago already??), we had an excellent text book that had about 10 color pages of different woods... I loaned it to my father, who promptly "lost" it among all his things.  I'll get it back some day, but not in the near future <sigh>.  But, head to your library and see if you can find a similar type book... it was a hard cover one that described how to use both hand and power tools to do basic carpentry.  You might even find one in your local book store in the Hobbies section.
             
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL
            Shire of Narrental (Peru, Indiana)  http://narrental.home.comcast.net
            Middle Kingdom
            http://meisterin.katarina.home.comcast.net
             
            "A room without books is like a body without a soul." -- Cicero
             
            "The danger in life is not that we aim too high and miss.
            The problem is that we aim too low and hit the mark."  -- Michaelangelo
             
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          • kjworz@comcast.net
            On side note, pallet wood being in drawer dimensions. It is good wood to practice your dovetails. The price is right if you mess up. You can end up with
            Message 5 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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              On side note, pallet wood being in drawer dimensions. It is good wood to practice your dovetails. The price is right if you mess up. You can end up with little boxes too from your practice and they can look pretty spiff in the shop or in camp. I imagine you COULD make a whole a bunch of little boxes from ostensibly free materials and set up your own little vendor booth at events selling them like hot-cakes. You won't get rich but you would get some money for buying more lumber for bigger projects.

              A beginning woodworker and blacksmith can sell the basic boxes and basic metal S-hooks and do just fine with our targetted customer base.

              --
              -Chris Schwartz
              Silver Spring, MD
            • Dan Baker
              I have use a lot of pallet wood in the past. I have found that a surface planner is indispensible. And once the wood is clean, it is a lot easier to
              Message 6 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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                I have use a lot of pallet wood in the past. I have found that a
                surface planner is indispensible. And once the wood is clean, it is a
                lot easier to identify. Don't expect one pallet to have all the same
                type of wood on it, it can vary a lot. So be sure to sort.

                The esiest way I have found to seperate slats from pallets is with a
                sawzall. Just pop in between the boards and nip the nails off, then
                use a punch to finish the nail from underneath. Downside is the
                heavier center boards have metal in them so can't be machined, but you
                get less damage to the slats.

                If price is a big issue, consider finding the local sawmills in your
                area. Ask if they have a kiln or sell everything green. Often they
                have a small kiln for unsold lumber, half pallets, etc. They will
                sell you that lumber cheap. I get soft wormy maple for $1 a board
                foot. If they don't have a kiln, they often just sticker(put sticks
                inbetween boards) and stack it in the yard and let it sit out in the
                weather. That wood I have gotten as cheap as $25 for a trailer load
                (about 30 or so boards 10-12 inches by 8-10 feet). You would also be
                surprised how much wood you can get by a gift of a 6-pack of beer.

                All of these ideas pretty much require you to invest in a decent
                surface planner. Consider them all carefully, not only price, and
                quality, but replacement blade cost. When I buy a new one I want one
                of the Grizzly ones with a spiral head of little square cutters. I
                think it will be worth it.

                -Rhys



                On 8/29/05, mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@...> wrote:
                > So at least in this respect, I am not a total nut case...as long as
                > all the nails are pulled before sanding.
                >
                > Thank you all for your words of experience.
                >
                > Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another?
                >
                > your servant,
                > mahee
                >
                >
                >
              • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                the top of my workbench is 1 thick plywood ( with a layer of masonite ) that I got from a crate that was being tossed.... Garbage picking is sometimes a good
                Message 7 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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                  the top of my workbench is 1" thick plywood
                  ( with a layer of masonite ) that I got from
                  a crate that was being tossed....

                  Garbage picking is sometimes a good thing.



                  --- maf@... wrote:

                  > The pallets we get at work are 4-6 feet wide and 10
                  > to 12 feet long. The 3
                  > boards that runn long wise are usually either 4"x4"
                  > or 4" x 5" fir posts,
                  > I've used a few of them for some interesting
                  > projects.
                  >
                  > Mark / Cered
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "mahee of acre" <mahee_of_acre@...>
                  > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2005 11:45 PM
                  > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] pallets
                  >
                  >
                  > > Once long ago I made a small tv stand out of
                  > pallet that a store was
                  > > throwing away. After much much sanding it turned
                  > out looking really
                  > > nice.
                  > >
                  > > The other day I decided to try my luck again with
                  > a pallet. I sanded
                  > > and sanded and ended up with a really nice looking
                  > piece of wood
                  > > that some friends say is oak.
                  > >
                  > > Is it just me that finds that pallet wood is nice?
                  > Is it really oak?
                  > > If so, why are they making pallets out of it and
                  > why are more people
                  > > not taking advantage of this free wood source??
                  > especially those of
                  > > us who do not have that much to spend in the first
                  > place?
                  > >
                  > > My plans are to make some looms out of
                  > them...maybe some furniture.
                  > >
                  > > Those with experience and knowledge on pallet
                  > wood, please tell me
                  > > if I am crazy or not and give any suggestions as
                  > well.
                  > >
                  > > thank you much,
                  > >
                  > > your servant,
                  > > mahee
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart

                  Aude Aliquid Dignum
                  ' Dare Something Worthy '

                  __________________________________________________
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                • Lew Newby
                  Yes a large number of pallets are made of oak for the strength. I actually found a pine pallet in my stack in the basement and the difference is huge in
                  Message 8 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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                    Yes a large number of pallets are made of oak for the strength. I
                    actually found a pine pallet in my stack in the basement and the
                    difference is huge in regards to strength and weight.

                    I was looking at using the material for something as well but my
                    cautioned me on running the boards through a planer as it is really hard
                    to tell if small gravel was embedded in the wood and a metal detector
                    wouldn't notice it. Rocks on planer blades, bad combination.

                    Farin


                    Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart wrote:

                    > the top of my workbench is 1" thick plywood
                    > ( with a layer of masonite ) that I got from
                    > a crate that was being tossed....
                    >
                    > Garbage picking is sometimes a good thing.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- maf@... wrote:
                    >
                    > > The pallets we get at work are 4-6 feet wide and 10
                    > > to 12 feet long. The 3
                    > > boards that runn long wise are usually either 4"x4"
                    > > or 4" x 5" fir posts,
                    > > I've used a few of them for some interesting
                    > > projects.
                    > >
                    > > Mark / Cered
                    > >
                    > > ----- Original Message -----
                    > > From: "mahee of acre" <mahee_of_acre@...>
                    > > To: <medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com>
                    > > Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2005 11:45 PM
                    > > Subject: [MedievalSawdust] pallets
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > > Once long ago I made a small tv stand out of
                    > > pallet that a store was
                    > > > throwing away. After much much sanding it turned
                    > > out looking really
                    > > > nice.
                    > > >
                    > > > The other day I decided to try my luck again with
                    > > a pallet. I sanded
                    > > > and sanded and ended up with a really nice looking
                    > > piece of wood
                    > > > that some friends say is oak.
                    > > >
                    > > > Is it just me that finds that pallet wood is nice?
                    > > Is it really oak?
                    > > > If so, why are they making pallets out of it and
                    > > why are more people
                    > > > not taking advantage of this free wood source??
                    > > especially those of
                    > > > us who do not have that much to spend in the first
                    > > place?
                    > > >
                    > > > My plans are to make some looms out of
                    > > them...maybe some furniture.
                    > > >
                    > > > Those with experience and knowledge on pallet
                    > > wood, please tell me
                    > > > if I am crazy or not and give any suggestions as
                    > > well.
                    > > >
                    > > > thank you much,
                    > > >
                    > > > your servant,
                    > > > mahee
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    > Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                    >
                    > Aude Aliquid Dignum
                    > ' Dare Something Worthy '
                    >
                    > __________________________________________________
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                    --
                    Lew Newby Jr.
                    dragon@...
                    ****** Draco Aliquando Vincent ******
                    (At some time the dragon shall conquer)
                  • Chuck Phillips
                    You may also want to get a metal detector, unless you re fond of swapping planer blades... Charles Joiner Lurking in Caid ... From:
                    Message 9 of 27 , Aug 29, 2005
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                      You may also want to get a metal detector, unless you're fond of swapping planer blades...
                       
                      Charles Joiner
                      Lurking in Caid
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com [mailto:medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dan Baker
                      Sent: Monday, August 29, 2005 2:21 PM
                      To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [MedievalSawdust] pallets with new question

                      I have use a lot of pallet wood in the past.  I have found that a
                      surface planner is indispensible.  And once the wood is clean, it is a
                      lot easier to identify.  Don't expect one pallet to have all the same
                      type of wood on it, it can vary a lot.  So be sure to sort.

                      The esiest way I have found to seperate slats from pallets is with a
                      sawzall.  Just pop in between the boards and nip the nails off, then
                      use a punch to finish the nail from underneath.  Downside is the
                      heavier center boards have metal in them so can't be machined, but you
                      get less damage to the slats.

                      If price is a big issue, consider finding the local sawmills in your
                      area.  Ask if they have a kiln or sell everything green.  Often they
                      have a small kiln for unsold lumber, half pallets, etc.  They will
                      sell you that lumber cheap.  I get soft wormy maple for $1 a board
                      foot.  If they don't have a kiln, they often just sticker(put sticks
                      inbetween boards) and stack it in the yard and let it sit out in the
                      weather.  That wood I have gotten as cheap as $25 for a trailer load
                      (about 30 or so boards 10-12 inches by 8-10 feet).  You would also be
                      surprised how much wood you can get by a gift of a 6-pack of beer.

                      All of these ideas pretty much require you to invest in a decent
                      surface planner.  Consider them all carefully, not only price, and
                      quality, but replacement blade cost.  When I buy a new one I want one
                      of the Grizzly ones with a spiral head of little square cutters.  I
                      think it will be worth it.

                      -Rhys



                      On 8/29/05, mahee of acre <mahee_of_acre@...> wrote:
                      > So at least in this respect, I am not a total nut case...as long as
                      > all the nails are pulled before sanding.
                      >
                      > Thank you all for your words of experience.
                      >
                      > Now...how do I learn to tell one kind of wood from another?
                      >
                      > your servant,
                      > mahee
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Christopher L. Janoch
                      Hello All!! I m trying to track down a Medieval writing desk that I ve seen in several Florentine Illuminations. (One of them pictured has been described as
                      Message 10 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                        Hello All!!

                        I'm trying to track down a Medieval writing desk that I've seen in several Florentine Illuminations.  (One of them pictured has been described as Cardinal Stefaneschi's Writing Desk, from around 1300-1450)

                        See uploaded Files Section....  Folder for "Cardinal Stefaneschi - Desk")

                        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/files/Cardinal%20Stefaneschi%20-%20Desk/


                        Has anyone seen a real example of this type of desk?  I'm thinking about creating one as a new project, and I'm really curious about the back...

                        Thanks!!

                        -- Rhydderch
                      • maf@gleichen.ca
                        That is really neat, perfect for the court scribe :) Mark / Cered ... From: Christopher L. Janoch To: medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, August 30,
                        Message 11 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                          That is really neat, perfect for the court scribe :)
                           
                          Mark / Cered
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2005 9:43 AM
                          Subject: [MedievalSawdust] Need Help Finding Writing Desk....

                          Hello All!!

                          I'm trying to track down a Medieval writing desk that I've seen in several Florentine Illuminations.  (One of them pictured has been described as Cardinal Stefaneschi's Writing Desk, from around 1300-1450)

                          See uploaded Files Section....  Folder for "Cardinal Stefaneschi - Desk")

                          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/files/Cardinal%20Stefaneschi%20-%20Desk/


                          Has anyone seen a real example of this type of desk?  I'm thinking about creating one as a new project, and I'm really curious about the back...

                          Thanks!!

                          -- Rhydderch
                        • Michael Houghton
                          Howdy! On Tue, Aug 30, 2005 at 11:43:15AM -0400, Christopher L. Janoch wrote: yep...a blank message. Please make sure your mailer includes a text/plain part if
                          Message 12 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                            Howdy!

                            On Tue, Aug 30, 2005 at 11:43:15AM -0400, Christopher L. Janoch wrote:


                            yep...a blank message.

                            Please make sure your mailer includes a text/plain part if you *must*
                            use HTML markup. Some of us use readers that only show plain text.

                            yours,
                            Herveus
                            --
                            Michael and MJ Houghton | Herveus d'Ormonde and Megan O'Donnelly
                            herveus@... | White Wolf and the Phoenix
                            Bowie, MD, USA | Tablet and Inkle bands, and other stuff
                            | http://www.radix.net/~herveus/wwap/
                          • Christopher L. Janoch
                            Sorry... Hello All!! I m trying to track down a Medieval writing desk that I ve seen in several Florentine Illuminations. (One of them pictured has been
                            Message 13 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                              Sorry...

                              Hello All!!

                              I'm trying to track down a Medieval writing desk that I've seen in several
                              Florentine Illuminations. (One of them pictured has been described as
                              Cardinal Stefaneschi's Writing Desk, from around 1300-1450)

                              See uploaded Files Section.... Folder for "Cardinal Stefaneschi - Desk")

                              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/medievalsawdust/files/Cardinal%20Stefaneschi%20-%20Desk/


                              Has anyone seen a real example of this type of desk? I'm thinking about
                              creating one as a new project, and I'm really curious about the back...

                              Thanks!!

                              -- Rhydderch

                              On 8/30/2005, Michael Houghton said...
                              >Howdy!
                              >
                              >On Tue, Aug 30, 2005 at 11:43:15AM -0400, Christopher L. Janoch wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >yep...a blank message.
                              >
                              >Please make sure your mailer includes a text/plain part if you *must*
                              >use HTML markup. Some of us use readers that only show plain text.
                              >
                              >yours,
                              >Herveus
                              >--
                              >Michael and MJ Houghton | Herveus d'Ormonde and Megan O'Donnelly
                              >herveus@... | White Wolf and the Phoenix
                              >Bowie, MD, USA | Tablet and Inkle bands, and other stuff
                              > | http://www.radix.net/~herveus/wwap/
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                              >
                              > Visit your group "medievalsawdust" on the web.
                              >
                              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                              > medievalsawdust-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                              >
                              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                              >
                              >
                            • Helen Schultz
                              Rhydderch: I m thinking that the back of the first chair is kind of fanciful... like the artist was limited in space, so he put in the bookshelf into the back
                              Message 14 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                                Rhydderch:
                                 
                                I'm thinking that the back of the first chair is kind of fanciful... like the artist was limited in space, so he put in the bookshelf into the back of the chair.  Kind of difficult to turn around to grab a book for inspiration, don't you think??  This writing desk, without the books at the chair back, can be seen in many early illuminations... but, I don't recall seeing any past the beginning of the 14th century, and I have also wanted to make one for a long time (being a scribe and a woodworker  <sheepish grin>).  As far as I know, no extant writing chairs have survived.
                                 
                                In your first example (the color one), the chair almost looks like it was carved out of stone, but that might not be the actual case.  The desk braces seem to go into holes made for them in at least two places, whereas the second B&W example shows only one place (which doesn't allow for much stability).  I like the details the illuminator put into the desk in the color image... note the nail heads ( ? ) that hold the writing surface to the braces, and both illuminators inset the inkwell into the writing surface.  And, I love the little dragon at the back of the chair <giggle>, which could also be a rendering of Titivilus (spelling?), patron demon of scribes (he was the cause of any mistakes found in the manuscript).
                                 
                                If you do make this chair, please keep us all informed of your progress... and I wish you the best on the project.
                                 
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                                Meisterin Katarina Helene von Schönborn, OL
                                Shire of Narrental (Peru, Indiana)  http://narrental.home.comcast.net
                                Middle Kingdom
                                http://meisterin.katarina.home.comcast.net
                                 
                                "A room without books is like a body without a soul." -- Cicero
                                 
                                "The danger in life is not that we aim too high and miss.
                                The problem is that we aim too low and hit the mark."  -- Michaelangelo
                                 
                                ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              • James Winkler
                                I just put a picture up in Chas. stuff that s worth checking out. I used to be concerned about fanciful depictions too... until I saw what I dubbed the
                                Message 15 of 27 , Aug 30, 2005
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                                  I just put a picture up in "Chas. stuff" that's worth checking out.  
                                   
                                  I used to be concerned about 'fanciful' depictions too... until I saw what I dubbed the 'Dr. Seuss chair'...  there's a painting of this chair that was done by Vittore Carpacio [St. Augustine in his study] c. 1502-8....  it looks WRONG... but, whadda' ya' know... seems that in the Palazzo Morando, Milan one of the suckers still exists...   oh... the thing on the top of the pointy back... that's a candle...  the thing is TOPPED OFF WITH A CANDLE!!!   How cool is that!!!  [Oh... and it’s a swivel seat!!!]  At this point I don't put anything past early carpenters...  or medieval taste...
                                   
                                  Anyway... the whole description and a set of plans for actually building the chair can be found in "MasterPieces: Making Furniture from Paintings" by Richard Ball & Peter Campbell; ISBN - 0688024882, Copyright 1983.   There are some other medieval pieces in there... as well as a functional sideboard from a Picasso painting...  (it LOOKS like the sideboard in the painting but has gone three dimensional and functional...)...
                                   
                                  The book is a hoot and has some great stuff in it... worth checking out...
                                   
                                   
                                  Chas.
                                   
                                  Katarina wrote: I'm thinking that the back of the first chair is kind of fanciful... like the artist was limited in space, so he put in the bookshelf into the back of the chair. 
                                • maeryk
                                  ... One point.. I did this with my shiny new Delta 12.5 inch planer and some GORGEOUS poplar pallets at work that had a deep purple grain line through them.
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Sep 19, 2005
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                                    --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Dan Baker <LordRhys@g...> wrote:
                                    > I have use a lot of pallet wood in the past. I have found that a
                                    > surface planner is indispensible. And once the wood is clean, it is a
                                    > lot easier to identify. Don't expect one pallet to have all the same
                                    > type of wood on it, it can vary a lot. So be sure to sort.
                                    >
                                    > The esiest way I have found to seperate slats from pallets is with a
                                    > sawzall. Just pop in between the boards and nip the nails off, then
                                    > use a punch to finish the nail from underneath. Downside is the
                                    > heavier center boards have metal in them so can't be machined, but you
                                    > get less damage to the slats.
                                    >

                                    One point.. I did this with my shiny new Delta 12.5 inch planer and
                                    some GORGEOUS poplar pallets at work that had a deep purple grain line
                                    through them.

                                    About four runs through my planer had developed several interesting
                                    grooves in the blades.

                                    Get a metal detector (the little wizard one is sufficient) if you are
                                    going to plane these things.. they are usually put together with coil
                                    nails, which can and do leave wires in the wood that don't always come
                                    out when you drive the nail back out!

                                    Maeryk
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