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Re: Chairs

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  • Alfricr
    Linda, I do use my cart at events and have been doing so for about 4 years now. It pretty much has held up with the exception of some minor repairs. As for the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 29, 2003
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      Linda,
       
      I do use my cart at events and have been doing so for about 4 years now. It pretty much has held up with the exception of some minor repairs.
       
      As for the chairs. Yes, they were made frome the plans from the Medieval Furniture book with some modifications and one correction. They are; 1. Modifing the seat bottom to allow for it to swing up allowing the chair to fold (The origional did not fold it broke apart for transport.)   2. Modifing the seat arms so they could swing up aiding in their removal from the chair. (Necessary for folding.) 3. Modified the plans bypassing the complex angled drilling of the arm holes where the seat back and bottom passes through each arm by placing spacers between the seat and arms which allowed for the holes to be drilled at 90 degrees. (much easier.) 4. Corrected the plan where the distance between the center points of the holes on the arms for the seat back and bottom is too short. The Author has this measurment at 23 1/2". I found that by using that measurment the seat back leaned forward making it impossible to sit in the chair. I altered this measurement to allow for a more comfortable seating position.
       
      Otherwise these chairs are a great project and realy enhance an encampment.
       
      Thanks for the complement!
       
      YIS,
       
      Alfric  
       
    • Tim Bray
      Alfric, those chairs are beautiful - it looks like you did a great job on them! I noticed the modifications to allow for folding; very clever. I ... Another
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 29, 2003
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        Alfric, those chairs are beautiful - it looks like you did a great job on them!  I noticed the modifications to allow for folding; very clever.  I also noticed this one:

        3. Modified the plans bypassing the complex angled drilling of the arm holes where the seat back and bottom passes through each arm by placing spacers between the seat and arms which allowed for the holes to be drilled at 90 degrees. (much easier.)

        Another way to do this is by making the back wider than the seat.  This is in fact the way all the other chairs of this type were made, as far as I have been able to determine; only the Glastonbury has the seat wider than the back.  This chair was extensively rebuilt sometime between 1800-1820, and I wonder if this was the way the chair was originally made.   See
        http://www.albionworks.net/ChairsPage/FoldingChairs.htm
        for examples of other chairs in this style.  (If anyone knows of other examples, please let me know!)

        Regards,
        Colin




        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
        www.albionworks.net
      • Alfricr
        Thank you for the compliment Colin. With regards to the seat back width. I had thought about making the back wider. However, this would have made the folding
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 30, 2003
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          Thank you for the compliment Colin.
           
          With regards to the seat back width. I had thought about making the back wider. However, this would have made the folding mechanics as designed difficult at best as the seat bottom in the rear hooks over the rear most dowl and must be able to lift free and swing forward in order to fold.
           
          Than you again for the compliment.
           
          Haoop Carving,
           
          Alfric
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Tim Bray
          Sent: Saturday, March 29, 2003 8:21 PM
          Subject: Re: [medievalsawdust] Re: Chairs

          Alfric, those chairs are beautiful - it looks like you did a great job on them!  I noticed the modifications to allow for folding; very clever.  I also noticed this one:

          3. Modified the plans bypassing the complex angled drilling of the arm holes where the seat back and bottom passes through each arm by placing spacers between the seat and arms which allowed for the holes to be drilled at 90 degrees. (much easier.)

          Another way to do this is by making the back wider than the seat.  This is in fact the way all the other chairs of this type were made, as far as I have been able to determine; only the Glastonbury has the seat wider than the back.  This chair was extensively rebuilt sometime between 1800-1820, and I wonder if this was the way the chair was originally made.   See
          http://www.albionworks.net/ChairsPage/FoldingChairs.htm
          for examples of other chairs in this style.  (If anyone knows of other examples, please let me know!)

          Regards,
          Colin




          Albion Works
          Furniture and Accessories
          For the Medievalist!
          www.albionworks.net

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        • Ron Jachim
          I m in need of two chairs _with_backs_ for 17th century Polish reenacting. Ideally, I d like something simple in design that folds up or disassembles into
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 3 8:26 AM
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            I'm in need of two chairs _with_backs_ for 17th century Polish
            reenacting. Ideally, I'd like something simple in design that folds
            up or disassembles into something fairly compact. I'm hoping to make
            them by our next event which is at the end of the month. Does anyone
            have any suggestions or phots of what they are using?

            The Glastonbury style isn't right for Eastern Europe.

            Thanks,
            Ron
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