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Question on drinking vessel finish and pyrography

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  • Copernicus Skygazer
    I m making a copy of one of the drinking vessels from the Sutton Hoo Ship Burial out of Maple burl, and was wondering, what, if any finishes were used
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 3 5:08 AM
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      I'm making a copy of one of the drinking vessels from the Sutton Hoo
      Ship Burial out of Maple burl, and was wondering, what, if any finishes
      were used historically to finish such an item?

      Any references would be greatly appreciated.

      Oh, and while I have a couple of minor references, any good ones for
      pyrography (aka poker work) in the medieval period would be greatly
      appreciated.

      YIS,
      Phillipos the Skeptic
    • Ralph Lindberg
      ... The problem is, finishes don t last, actually -knowing- what they used is, well, tough. If you do a search of this groups archives on salad oil finish
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 3 7:40 AM
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        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Copernicus Skygazer
        <muck@f...> wrote:
        > I'm making a copy of one of the drinking vessels from the Sutton Hoo
        > Ship Burial out of Maple burl, and was wondering, what, if any finishes
        > were used historically to finish such an item?
        >
        The problem is, finishes don't last, actually -knowing- what they
        used is, well, tough.
        If you do a search of this groups archives on "" "salad oil" finish
        "" you will see a discusion we had last April. Where we talked about
        Olive Oil (I tried it, didn't like it) and Walnut Oil (and maybe others)

        Personally, for food surfaces I use modern. I do a buffed oil
        (Danish) exterior and a food-safe poly interior. That way the user
        never has to worry about if the food/drink will pickup anything from
        the bowl. Remember that there people that are alergic to nut oils

        > Any references would be greatly appreciated.
        >
        > Oh, and while I have a couple of minor references, any good ones for
        > pyrography (aka poker work) in the medieval period would be greatly
        > appreciated.
        >
        If I recall correctly there is something in the standard "English
        Oak Furniture" book (that most of us appear to have)

        A further really good refence you might want to find is York Trust
        Book "Craft, Industry and Everyday Life: Wood and Woodworking in
        Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval York" ISBN 1 902771 10 9
        Lots and lots of good period turning info there.

        TTFN
        Ralg
        AnTir
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