Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

hello

Expand Messages
  • Kathy Vinson
    Hi , My name is Lady Rosamonde , I just joined your group and thought I would say hello . I have been carving and building medieval furniture as a hobby for
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 26, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi , My name is Lady Rosamonde , I just joined your group and thought I would say hello . I have been carving and building medieval furniture as a hobby for about 4 years now ,though I just found this group yesterday. I'm glad to have found you and look forward to posting and reading posts .
      thanks
      Lady Rosamonde of Arn Hold


       


      Get more from the Web. FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com
    • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
      ... You got any pictures? Would love to see them! ===== Baron Conal O hAirt / Jim Hart Aude Aliquid Dignum Dare Something Worthy
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 26, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        --- Kathy Vinson <Lady_Rosamonde@...> wrote:
        > Hi , My name is Lady Rosamonde , I just joined your
        > group and thought I would say hello . I have been
        > carving and building medieval furniture as a hobby
        > for about 4 years now ,though I just found this
        > group yesterday. I'm glad to have found you and look
        > forward to posting and reading posts .
        > thanks
        > Lady Rosamonde of Arn HoldGet more from the Web.
        > FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com
        >

        You got any pictures? Would love to see them!


        =====
        Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
        Aude Aliquid Dignum
        ' Dare Something Worthy '

        __________________________________________________
        Do you Yahoo!?
        Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
        http://platinum.yahoo.com
      • Tim Bray
        Greetings all, Here s something that has been nagging at me for a while; might make a good discussion. Almost every book that mentions medieval furniture makes
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 28, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Greetings all,

          Here's something that has been nagging at me for a while; might make a good
          discussion.

          Almost every book that mentions medieval furniture makes some remark like,
          "Medieval society was mobile, so furniture was sparse and essentially
          portable." Is there much evidence in art, archaeology, or documents to
          support this thesis?

          This question keeps coming up for me, because my SCA customers invariably
          want their furniture designed to knockdown flat, so it is easy to
          pack. Then I go looking for medieval examples, following Cariadoc's theory
          that the way it was done in period is most likely the easiest/best
          way. But I can find few examples from which to draw my designs. Look at
          trestles, for instance: Can anyone point me to an example of a medieval
          (tripod) trestle that breaks down flat?

          Cheers,
          Colin


          Albion Works
          Furniture and Accessories
          For the Medievalist!
          www.albionworks.net
        • Tom Rettie
          ... Well, I think I d disagree with the idea of medieval society as being mobile. As a percentage of population, the vase majority were bound to agriculture,
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 30, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            >Almost every book that mentions medieval furniture makes some remark like,
            >"Medieval society was mobile, so furniture was sparse and essentially
            >portable." Is there much evidence in art, archaeology, or documents to
            >support this thesis?
            >
            >This question keeps coming up for me, because my SCA customers invariably
            >want their furniture designed to knockdown flat, so it is easy to
            >pack. Then I go looking for medieval examples, following Cariadoc's theory
            >that the way it was done in period is most likely the easiest/best
            >way. But I can find few examples from which to draw my designs. Look at
            >trestles, for instance: Can anyone point me to an example of a medieval
            >(tripod) trestle that breaks down flat?

            Well, I think I'd disagree with the idea of medieval society as being
            "mobile." As a percentage of population, the vase majority were bound to
            agriculture, which is not a mobile life. For a very small segment of
            society, such as judges riding a circuit, some clerics, or nobles who
            needed to move about multiple houses with some regularity, portable
            furniture might be useful, but I still doubt they would haul large
            quantities of their furniture around on a regular basis.

            I think your customers may also have some confusion over "portable" versus
            "moveable." Trestle tables were intended to be put up and taken down within
            the same house, even the same room, more than they were intended to be
            hauled around the countryside. As such, there would be no need for trestles
            to break down flat.

            You do find references in period inventories to "field beds" and other
            types that sound as if they were intended for packing, but examples don't
            seem to have survived until the 18th century.

            One myth I run into all the time (popular among art historians) is that
            chests with feet were intended for fixed home use, and chests without feet
            were intended for travelling. But look at the Mary Rose, a Tudor warship
            that sank in battle, and almost half the recovered chests are of the footed
            types. The tripod trestles did not break down, though there was also a
            folding x-type trestle that did go flat.

            In the SCA there is a definite bias toward lightweight furniture that can
            be broken down, because of the nature of SCA activities. That's fine, but
            we should be sure not to confuse that with what most medieval furniture was
            like. I just got back last night from 2 weeks in England, including a tour
            of the V&A furniture storage facility, and for surviving furniture I saw
            from the 13th through the 16th centuries, the predominant type is not what
            we would today call portable (with some exceptions to be sure). Moveable,
            sure, but not stuff you can pack flat in the trunk of a car.

            Thomas


            ------------------------------------------------
            Tom Rettie tom@...
            http://www.his.com/~tom/index.html
          • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
            I just got back last night from 2 weeks in ... Hey, I m going back over to London in October. How does one go about seeing this sotrage facility? Hope you took
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 30, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              I just got back last night from 2 weeks in
              > England, including a tour
              > of the V&A furniture storage facility, and for
              > surviving furniture I saw
              > from the 13th through the 16th centuries, the
              > predominant type is not what
              > we would today call portable (with some exceptions
              > to be sure). Moveable,
              > sure, but not stuff you can pack flat in the trunk
              > of a car.
              >
              > Thomas


              Hey, I'm going back over to London in October.
              How does one go about seeing this sotrage facility?

              Hope you took picutres!
              ( and are willing to share.... )



              =====
              Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
              Aude Aliquid Dignum
              ' Dare Something Worthy '

              __________________________________________________
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
              http://platinum.yahoo.com
            • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
              I just got back last night from 2 weeks in ... Hey, I m going back over to London in October. How does one go about seeing this sotrage facility? Hope you took
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 30, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                I just got back last night from 2 weeks in
                > England, including a tour
                > of the V&A furniture storage facility, and for
                > surviving furniture I saw
                > from the 13th through the 16th centuries, the
                > predominant type is not what
                > we would today call portable (with some exceptions
                > to be sure). Moveable,
                > sure, but not stuff you can pack flat in the trunk
                > of a car.
                >
                > Thomas


                Hey, I'm going back over to London in October.
                How does one go about seeing this sotrage facility?

                Hope you took pictures!
                ( and are willing to share.... )



                =====
                Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                Aude Aliquid Dignum
                ' Dare Something Worthy '

                __________________________________________________
                Do you Yahoo!?
                Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
                http://platinum.yahoo.com
              • James Winkler
                Thomas makes a good point. but I would add to it depends on when and where in the medieval society you re talking about . The Chinese had massive amounts
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 30, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thomas makes a good point…  but I would add to it "depends on when and where in the 'medieval society' you're talking about".  The Chinese had massive amounts of furniture that would make Ethan Allen stuff look like junk…  peasants in the [10th, 11th, 12th, etc.] western europe weren't particularly mobile but nobility tended to be more so.  The merchant class in later periods got around a bit… 
                   
                  I'd say 'as a general rule'… the more stable and wealthy a class the more comforts they tended to have… I.e., the more furniture.   The quality and quantity of goods was more of a reflection of economic status.  Noble lords and ladies who did move around had servants and wagons for moving their stuff… so it went with them.  There's a story of a lady who had a knock down bed that traveled with her and it even had its own 'custom' bag fitted to protect it…  some early 14th c. manuscripts show stonemasons working off of single leg stools (still 'movables' as Thomas put it)… 
                   
                  I tend to agree that there was a LOT of furniture around…  maybe not exactly in the sense that we think of it today… but a LOT of furniture.  [I can even show you a period 'porta-potty'… ] The trick is to look into the back corners of the illuminations and paintings…  most of the really interesting pieces won't be found in the foregrounds. 

                  I'm not sure what you mean about trestles that don't break down flat…  many of the tables I've seen are break down-able…  Even the solid leg trestle like the St. Jerome's table breaks down flat… 

                  >> One myth I run into all the time (popular among art historians)
                  is that
                  chests with feet were intended for fixed home use, and chests without feet
                  were intended for travelling. <<
                   
                  From personal experience… all my chests have feet of some sort on them… when yer' set up at Pennsic or Gulf Wars and the dampness begins to form small rivers through your pavillion… everything up on legs means NO WET STUFF!!!  We don't use a ground cloth… the water runs in… the water runs out…  whatever happens to get the ground damp sinks in…  as long as your 'stuff' in in boxes with feet… life continues to be good.  Now… chest WITH feet do tend to be a little more cumbersome to pack… but its not impossible…  you can always use the space between the legs to stuff small things in and around. 

                  >> In the SCA there is a definite bias toward lightweight furniture that can
                  be broken down, because of the nature of SCA activities. <<
                   
                  AMEN…  the lighter and more transportable… the more junk ya' can carry!!!
                   
                  >> and for surviving furniture I saw
                  from the 13th through the 16th centuries, the predominant type is not what
                  we would today call portable (with some exceptions to be sure). Moveable,
                  sure, but not stuff you can pack flat in the trunk of a car. <<

                  Yep… my THEORY on this is that the 'portable' stuff probably went the way of many of the pavilions and other outdoorsy stuff.  Although I can have a river run through my pavilion… I realize that… after a while, water damage WILL occur.  I own a 16th c. chest that shows that fact on its feet… and, if you look take a good close look at some of the 6-board coffer chests in various sources you'll see some with extended end boards to make long 'legs' and some with short stubby legs…  Looking at the dimensions of the box itself… there's not much variance… my GUESS is that the legs… once the water got to the feet, were simply shortened.
                   
                  Chas. Oakley
                • Joseph Hayes
                  ... There s a line in Chinnery s Oak Furniture about a post-period campaign bed which he assumes is based on earlier models, but as I recall, he didn t
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 31, 2003
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > You do find references in period inventories to "field beds" and
                    > other types that sound as if they were intended for packing, but
                    > examples don't seem to have survived until the 18th century.

                    There's a line in Chinnery's "Oak Furniture" about a post-period
                    campaign bed which he assumes is based on earlier models, but as I
                    recall, he didn't include a picture, only the museum it's in.

                    Ulrich


                    __________________________________________________
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
                    http://platinum.yahoo.com
                  • Joseph Hayes
                    ... There s a line in Chinnery s Oak Furniture about a post-period campaign bed which he assumes is based on earlier models, but as I recall, he didn t
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 31, 2003
                    • 0 Attachment
                      > You do find references in period inventories to "field beds" and
                      > other types that sound as if they were intended for packing, but
                      > examples don't seem to have survived until the 18th century.

                      There's a line in Chinnery's "Oak Furniture" about a post-period
                      campaign bed which he assumes is based on earlier models, but as I
                      recall, he didn't include a picture, only the museum it's in.

                      Ulrich


                      __________________________________________________
                      Do you Yahoo!?
                      Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
                      http://platinum.yahoo.com
                    • Joseph Hayes
                      Hi all, I m making plans for a drawleaf table. I d like to do breadboard ends, but but only have two pictures of period tables with breadboard ends as
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 31, 2003
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi all,

                        I'm making plans for a drawleaf table. I'd like to do breadboard ends,
                        but but only have two pictures of period tables with breadboard ends as
                        documentation. Since tabletops are easily replaced, there's no way for
                        me to tell if they're original. Does anyone have any firm
                        documentation, espeically paintings, drawings, or woodcuts?

                        Thanks,
                        Ulrich


                        __________________________________________________
                        Do you Yahoo!?
                        Yahoo! Platinum - Watch CBS' NCAA March Madness, live on your desktop!
                        http://platinum.yahoo.com
                      • Tom Rettie
                        ... You have to make an appointment with one of the curators. It helps if you can be specific about what you re interested in, the more specific the better. I
                        Message 11 of 13 , Apr 2 4:56 PM
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, Conal O'hAirt Jim
                          Hart <baronconal@y...> wrote:

                          > Hey, I'm going back over to London in October.
                          > How does one go about seeing this sotrage facility?
                          >
                          > Hope you took pictures!
                          > ( and are willing to share.... )

                          You have to make an appointment with one of the curators. It
                          helps if you can be specific about what you're interested in, the
                          more specific the better.

                          I did take pictures (oh, about 700 over 2 weeks, mostly
                          medieval/Elizabethan furniture and architecture), but at most
                          places that allow photography, it's for "personal study" only. The
                          V&A folks were rather specific about that bit. But if someone is
                          interested in something specific, we might be able to work out a
                          private swap.

                          If you have the time, I strongly urge a daytrip down to Portsmouth
                          to see the Mary Rose. The hull is remarkable, and the artifacts in
                          the museum are really amazing. The Weald and Downland
                          Museum (near Chichester) is also well worth the trip.

                          Thomas
                        • Conal O'hAirt Jim Hart
                          What am I interrested in?.... hmmm... Stuff made from wood. ( if I have to get more specific 14th Cen, boxes chests, coffers, chairs, tools.... ) ... This time
                          Message 12 of 13 , Apr 3 5:48 PM
                          • 0 Attachment
                            What am I interrested in?....

                            hmmm...

                            Stuff made from wood.
                            ( if I have to get more
                            specific 14th Cen, boxes
                            chests, coffers, chairs,
                            tools.... )
                            >
                            > If you have the time, I strongly urge a daytrip down
                            > to Portsmouth
                            > to see the Mary Rose. The hull is remarkable, and
                            > the artifacts in
                            > the museum are really amazing. The Weald and
                            > Downland
                            > Museum (near Chichester) is also well worth the
                            > trip.

                            This time the trip away from London
                            is north to York and Lees


                            =====
                            Baron Conal O'hAirt / Jim Hart
                            Aude Aliquid Dignum
                            ' Dare Something Worthy '

                            __________________________________________________
                            Do you Yahoo!?
                            Yahoo! Tax Center - File online, calculators, forms, and more
                            http://tax.yahoo.com
                          • Tom Rettie
                            ... York also has some excellent stuff. Barley Hall has excellent reproductions of period furniture, and great prices on period pottery. The Yorkshire Museum
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 4 3:40 AM
                            • 0 Attachment
                              >This time the trip away from London
                              >is north to York and Lees

                              York also has some excellent stuff. Barley Hall has excellent reproductions
                              of period furniture, and great prices on period pottery. The Yorkshire
                              Museum has wooden artifacts from the excavations in York, including wooden
                              bowls, turning cores, etc. Jorvik is a little hokey but still fun and does
                              contain some woodworking artifacts. The Merchant Adventurers' Hall was
                              closed when we were there, but is an impressive 14th c. building (and
                              contains some furniture). And of course York Minster is incredible. We
                              extended our stay in York because we were having such a good time, and will
                              probably go back.

                              Leeds of course has the Royal Armouries. Once you find them, they're a lot
                              of fun.

                              Thomas

                              ------------------------------------------------
                              Tom Rettie tom@...
                              http://www.his.com/~tom/index.html
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.