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Re: [medievalsawdust] Digest Number 143

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  • John LaTorre
    ... The second option is the ideal one, but sharpening isn t rocket science and any decent book on woodworking will give you the basics. My favorite book on
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 21, 2003
      Jessimond wrote:

      > OK, what is the best way to sharpen a draw knife? Should I try to
      > find a book on sharpening tools, or find a person who is willing to
      > teach me "hands on"?

      The second option is the ideal one, but sharpening isn't rocket science and
      any decent book on woodworking will give you the basics. My favorite book
      on the specific subject is Patrick Spielman's "Sharpening Basics" (ISBN
      0-8069-7226-2) which, at $11.00, is a bargain. (There are more expensive
      books, to be sure, but the difference is mainly in the pictures -- glossy
      color instead of clear black-and-white.)

      The more you talk to people, the more complicated the subject seems to get,
      with topics like oilstones, waterstones, diamond stones, drill-press
      sandpaper setups, plate-glass sandpaper setups, Tormek systems,
      microbeveling and so on being discussed with religious fervor. But the
      fundamentals are all the same. The above-mentioned tools and techniques
      differ in their expense, efficiency and versatility, with some of them
      being better adapted to some tools and budgets than others, that's all.

      And anyone on this list can tell you that any time you spend in sharpening
      the tool will be well rewarded by your increase in control and efficiency.
      Abraham Lincoln is supposed to have said "Give me two hours to fell a tree,
      and I would spend the first hour sharpening my axe."

      --

      John LaTorre (Johann von Drachenfels)

      "Always do right. It will gratify some people & astonish the rest."
      --Mark Twain
    • guydemontange
      Then there s those of us who simply can not seem to get a decent edge on anything, no matter what books, techniques, etc we study and try. I m
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 21, 2003
        Then there's those of us who simply can not seem to get a decent edge
        on anything, no matter what books, techniques, etc we study and try.


        I'm stone-challenged, I think.




        Um, oh yeah. Introductions. ;)


        I'm Guy de Mont Ange, from Terra Pomaria in An Tir, and a terribly
        unskilled but enthusiastic woodworker. Been in for a bit over 7 years,
        and love it. I've been enjoying the posts from lurkville for a couple
        weeks, but had to come out for this one, because I've been trying to
        learn to sharpen blades and tools off and on for 30 years and have
        decided the Gods must be out to get me for something. Now I just
        support my local saw shop.


        Guy




        --- In medievalsawdust@yahoogroups.com, John LaTorre <jlatorre@m...>
        wrote:


        >


        >


        > Jessimond wrote:


        >


        > > OK, what is the best way to sharpen a draw knife? Should I try to


        > > find a book on sharpening tools, or find a person who is willing
        to


        > > teach me "hands on"?


        >


        > The second option is the ideal one, but sharpening isn't rocket
        science and


        > any decent book on woodworking will give you the basics. My favorite
        book


        > on the specific subject is Patrick Spielman's "Sharpening Basics"
        (ISBN


        > 0-8069-7226-2) which, at $11.00, is a bargain. (There are more
        expensive


        > books, to be sure, but the difference is mainly in the pictures --
        glossy


        > color instead of clear black-and-white.)


        >


        > The more you talk to people, the more complicated the subject seems
        to get,


        > with topics like oilstones, waterstones, diamond stones, drill-press


        > sandpaper setups, plate-glass sandpaper setups, Tormek systems,


        > microbeveling and so on being discussed with religious fervor. But
        the


        > fundamentals are all the same. The above-mentioned tools and
        techniques


        > differ in their expense, efficiency and versatility, with some of
        them


        > being better adapted to some tools and budgets than others, that's
        all.


        >


        > And anyone on this list can tell you that any time you spend in
        sharpening


        > the tool will be well rewarded by your increase in control and
        efficiency.


        > Abraham Lincoln is supposed to have said "Give me two hours to fell
        a tree,


        > and I would spend the first hour sharpening my axe."


        >


        > --


        >


        > John LaTorre (Johann von Drachenfels)


        >


        > "Always do right. It will gratify some people & astonish the rest."


        > --Mark Twain
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