Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [MedievalSawdust] Dove Tail ponderance

Expand Messages
  • Thomas Lee Case
    ... I m interested in more information on this style of chest. At one time I had photo copies of pictures of chests which were apparently framed with half
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 5, 2005
      On Wednesday 01 June 2005 01:35 pm, Dan Baker wrote:
      > The ones I remember all seemed to be very large, very thick chests.
      > It seemed to me at the time that it might be for alignment, to hold
      > everything in place while it was being nailed. At least as much that
      > as for any additional strength. If you are working with big awkward
      > pieces, something to hold it in dry fit would be very useful.
      >
      > I don't think Bessy was making K clamps in the middle ages. ; )
      >
      > -Rhys
      >
      > On 5/31/05, Tim Bray <tbray@...> wrote:
      > > Hmmm, are we including cases where there is a single dovetail in an
      > > otherwise butt jointed side? I have seen a few of those, I was
      > > thinking they were earlier then 1400s, I'll have to look.
      > > You're right, there are a few examples of chests with a single dovetail
      > > at each side. They are kind of an odd creature, because the actual
      > > joinery is done with nails - it's not clear to me what the dovetail is
      > > doing. When I first saw a drawing of this, I thought it was a fake, but
      > > have seen evidence of others, so I guess they were real.


      I'm interested in more information on this style of chest.
      At one time I had photo copies of pictures of chests which were apparently
      framed with half lapped dove tail joints ( in the manner of the half lapped
      dovetail joints used in timber framed building construction), instead of
      mortise and tenon construction. It would seem that I've lost that information
      over the years.
      I would like to locate information about their construction, and provenance.

      On a related note, this site
      http://www.amgron.clara.net/dovetails/dvtailtesting/dvtailtestindex.htm
      describes testing that indicates that when glue is not used, that the strength
      of a dovetail joint increases as the angle of the dovetails increases, up to
      about 35 degrees.


      Thomas Lee Case
    • Tim Bray
      ... One or two are shown or described in: Church Chests of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries in England, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, F.R.I.B.A. No ISBN.
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 5, 2005
        I'm interested in more information on this style of chest.
        At one time I had photo copies of pictures of chests which were apparently
        framed with half lapped dove tail joints ( in the manner of the half lapped
        dovetail joints used in timber framed building construction), instead of
        mortise and tenon construction. It would seem that I've lost that information
        over the years.
        I would like to locate information about their construction, and provenance.

        One or two are shown or described in:
        Church Chests of the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries in England, by Philip Mainwaring Johnston, F.R.I.B.A.
        No ISBN.  Reprint of an article from Archaeological Journal, v. 64, no. 4, 1907.
        Available from Caber Press, 7459 N. Fenwick, Portland OR 97217.
        http://home.teleport.com/~tcl/caber.htm
        Master Magnus got Jack to reprint this, and it is the best $12.95 (plus shipping) you will ever spend.


        On a related note, this site
         http://www.amgron.clara.net/dovetails/dvtailtesting/dvtailtestindex.htm
        describes testing that indicates that when glue is not used, that the strength
        of a dovetail joint increases as the angle of the dovetails increases, up to
        about 35 degrees.

        I think we talked about that before... very interesting findings, especially the part about the joint being _stronger_ without glue!

        My conclusion, IIRC, was that this probably went a long way toward explaining the preference for wide dovetail angles in the late MA, because I don't think they relied much on glue.

        Cheers,
        Colin


        Albion Works
        Furniture and Accessories
        For the Medievalist!
      • Tim Bray
        By the way - those 1430s dovetailed carcases I was talking about, on the Belgian retables? They have face-miters, something like the ones shown here:
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 5, 2005
          By the way - those 1430s dovetailed carcases I was talking about, on the Belgian retables?  They have face-miters, something like the ones shown here:
          http://www.amgron.clara.net/dovetails/boxdovetails/boxdovetailindex.htm
          But only on the front edge.

          Cheers,
          Colin


          Albion Works
          Furniture and Accessories
          For the Medievalist!
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.